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Mom Says Mentally Impaired Daughter Denied Transplant

Courtesy Chrissy Rivera(PHILADELPHIA) -- Amelia "Mia" Rivera has Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a complex genetic disorder that causes mental and physical impairments.  If she doesn't get a kidney in the next six months to a year, her family says the 3-year-old will die.

Mia's mother, Chrissy Rivera, has said the family is willing to donate a live organ, but Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has reportedly told her that they will not recommend transplantation for the toddler because of her disabilities.

Rivera blogged about her daughter's plight last Friday, and now more than 20,000 online supporters from 15 states are petitioning the hospital to give the toddler the kidney they say she needs to survive.

"I didn't think it was going to be an issue," said Rivera, a 35-year-old high school English teacher from southern New Jersey who has two other children, aged 11 and 6.

When the family went to CHOP last week to discuss the transplant, Rivera said she, "thought we were just finding out how transplant works and how we could be a donor."

"But then, I was told we couldn't because she was mentally retarded," she said. "Those were the exact words on a piece of paper."

Rivera said the doctor also mentioned the medication that Mia would have to take for the rest of her life and "how important it was she take it -- and who would make her take it when we weren't around anymore?"

"Everyone should be treated equally," she said.  "This is outrageous."

About 35 percent of the children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome do not survive beyond the age of 2, although several individuals have lived to adulthood.  Rivera said that Mia has about six months to a year before she will die without a kidney transplant.

Rivera also argues that medical information about the syndrome is "out-dated" and there is now "hope" that Mia could well benefit from a kidney transplant.

The hospital would not respond to questions about the Rivera case, citing privacy laws, but provided a prepared release.

"The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia does not disqualify potential transplant candidates on the basis of intellectual abilities," it wrote. "We have transplanted many children with a wide range of disabilities, including physical and intellectual disabilities. We at CHOP are deeply committed to providing the best possible medical care to all children, including those with any form of disability."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

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