Bacteria Helps Beef Up Immunity, Study Says

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- When it comes to bacteria, many people have a pretty simple view: Germs are bad, and our lives should be as free of them as possible.

But an alternate idea suggests just the opposite: Germs are a necessary part of a healthy immune system, helping our body's defenses beef up and fight future illnesses.  When a person's exposure to germs is decreased, problems may arise.

The idea is called the hygiene hypothesis.  For years, scientists have suspected that it played a role in how diseases affect people in the modern hand-sanitized world, but they never had any specific evidence.

But a new study from researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston has changed that.

Researchers studied two kinds of mice: One group had been exposed to a normal bacteria environment, and another group that was germ-free.  When scientists compared the immune systems of the two groups of mice, they found what they cited as evidence to support the hygiene hypothesis -- the mice that had been exposed to microbes had stronger immune systems than the germ-free mice.

Additionally, the germ-free mice had exaggerated inflammation in their lungs and colon, similar to what is seen in humans who have asthma and ulcerative colitis.  The researchers found that a particular kind of immune cell, called an invariant natural killer T cell, was particularly hyperactive in these mice.

But all was not lost for the germ-free mice.  When the researchers introduced them to microbes in the first few weeks of their lives, their fragile immune systems beefed up to a normal level.  But older germ-free mice didn't get this beneficial effect.

The results were published Friday in the journal Science.

The researchers only investigated mice, not people, but experts said the biologic mechanism they studied was similar in both rodents and humans.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

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