Mother’s Obesity Surgery May Break Cycle in Kids

George Doyle/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Children born to mothers who have undergone weight-loss surgery weigh less than their siblings born before the mother's surgery.

According to a study published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, not only were children conceived post-surgery less likely to be obese, they also had fewer risk factors for heart disease and diabetes. Researchers believe that because mothers absorb less fat and fewer calories after their surgery, the nutritional environment in their womb may be altered, training their children's genes to work differently.

While obesity may pass along problems from mother to child, researchers are not yet certain whether the benefits seen by children conceived after weight-loss surgery are permanent.

Additionally, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists points out that a mother's weight when they conceive is not all that matters. While mothers are supposed to gain weight during pregnancy, packing on too many pounds can significantly increase the child's risk of obesity and diabetes.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

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