Group Hopes to Ban Smoking in Cars With Kids


5  Updated at 10:42 am, March 24th, 2014 By: Managing Editor
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(IDAHO FALLS, ID) – A group of Idaho Falls mothers are actively promoting a petition that would outlaw smoking in vehicles with children present. Tavia Pickett says she’d like to see a state ordinance against it. Utah, Oregon, and California already have laws against smoking in cars with kids present. Pickett believes it’s more harmful than air pollution. The group has managed to gather over 300 signatures, but they’re still a long way away from their goal of 2,000.

  • harleyrider1778

    Another Junk Study from CDC most likely funded by a grant from big pharma like their 9 states economic harm study on smoking bans!
    Below explains how the Junk science of car bans is so JUNKY!
    Thats why CDC didnt include any measurements of anything in their study.Its normal tobacco control propaganda,questionaires to get a science by headline story tossed out there for the liberal media to spread like poison.

    Chris Snowden does an excellent job debunking the junk science of car ban science!

    Just open the window!

  • harleyrider1778

    This pretty well destroys the Myth of second hand smoke:

    Lungs from pack-a-day smokers safe for transplant, study finds.

    By JoNel Aleccia, Staff Writer, NBC News.

    Using lung transplants from heavy smokers may sound like a cruel joke, but a new study finds that organs taken from people who puffed a pack a day for more than 20 years are likely safe.

    What’s more, the analysis of lung transplant data from the U.S. between 2005 and 2011 confirms what transplant experts say they already know: For some patients on a crowded organ waiting list, lungs from smokers are better than none.

    “I think people are grateful just to have a shot at getting lungs,” said Dr. Sharven Taghavi, a cardiovascular surgical resident at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, who led the new study………………………

    Ive done the math here and this is how it works out with second ahnd smoke and people inhaling it!

    The 16 cities study conducted by the U.S. DEPT OF ENERGY and later by Oakridge National laboratories discovered:

    Cigarette smoke, bartenders annual exposure to smoke rises, at most, to the equivalent of 6 cigarettes/year.


    A bartender would have to work in second hand smoke for 2433 years to get an equivalent dose.

    Then the average non-smoker in a ventilated restaurant for an hour would have to go back and forth each day for 119,000 years to get an equivalent 20 years of smoking a pack a day! Pretty well impossible ehh!

  • harleyrider1778

    Confidence trick

    It is essential that campaigners create the impression of inevitable success. Campaigning of this kind is literally a confidence trick: the appearance of confidence both creates confidence and demoralises the opposition.”…/19/health.healthandwellbeing

  • harleyrider1778

    Before World War II, Nazi propaganda strategy, officially promulgated by the Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, stressed several themes. Their goals were to establish external enemies (countries that allegedly inflicted the Treaty of Versailles on Germany) and internal enemies, such as Jews, Romani, homosexuals, and Bolsheviks. Hitler and Nazi propagandists played on the anti-Semitism and resentment present in Germany. The Jews were blamed for things such as robbing the German people of their hard work while themselves avoiding physical labour. Der Stürmer, a Nazi propaganda newspaper, told Germans that Jews kidnapped small children before Passover because “Jews need the blood of a Christian child, maybe, to mix in with their Matzah.” Posters, films, cartoons, and fliers were seen throughout Germany which attacked the Jewish community, such as the 1940 film The Eternal Jew.


  • harleyrider1778

    5 Propaganda Techniques

    Propaganda techniques are commonly encountered in commercial advertising but these techniques, or variations of them, are used by political campaigns and nearly every other organization that needs to persuade the public. The five techniques are known as bandwagon, testimonial, transfer, repetition and emotional words.


    The bandwagon technique seeks to convince people that “everyone” is doing something, or likes something and you should too. This method plays on an individual’s need for social acceptance. One example of this is seen in political rallies with large cheering crowds, waving flags and cheering or booing in unison. In advertising it is common. Examples include a 1959 Elvis Presley album titled “50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can’t Be Wrong: Elvis’ Golden Records, Vol. 2” and any TV programs that claims to be “the show America is talking about.”


    Testimonials use people to persuade other people of the value or importance of something. This is most frequently done with celebrity endorsements but it is also done with experts or average people. In politics, this can be as simple as having the president or another popular political leader endorse an idea or point of view. In advertising, examples include Jenny Craig having celebrities talk about their diet plans in commercials and any advertisement that uses a doctor or someone dressed as a doctor to say something is healthy.


    The transfer technique involves using symbolism to give virtues to a product or idea. This is sometimes done with celebrities, such as putting athletes on a Wheaties box or putting Michael Jordan’s name on sneakers. Sometimes placing, for example, an American flag next to a product can convince people that it is somehow patriotic. Products also might be placed in a hospital setting to give the impression that a product is healthy or somehow endorsed by medical workers. This type of propaganda is most frequently found in print advertising


    Repetition is the most frequently used propaganda and advertising technique. Repetition works under the assumption that the more often people hear something the more likely they are to believe it, even on a subconscious level. In politics this is known as “staying on message.” A politician, during a campaign, speaks to different groups of people every day, but always includes the same handful of points that they wish to make. In advertising, it works basically the same way. An advertiser will attempt to convey the same handful of points about a product in all of their advertising including television, radio, print and digital.

    Emotional Words

    The emotional words technique uses strong language to attempt to persuade people. This can mean an impassioned speech but relates more often to key words that trigger emotion in people. For example, putting the word “free” in an ad causes it to be looked at more closely even if the product is not free. Putting the word “important” or “urgent” at the top of a page will make people more likely to look at it. In politics this technique is used almost constantly. Referring to an idea as “left wing” or “right wing,” “liberal” or “conservative” automatically triggers certain responses to the idea. Calling a foreign government a “regime” automatically implies certain attributes about that government.

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