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Is a New Job Worth Givebacks?

Is a New Job Worth Givebacks?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — What would you be willing to sacrifice to get a new job?Monster Worldwide put that question to 1,100 job seekers, and the results reveal that a small minority would be willing to give up some pay, benefits or vacation time to work elsewhere.According to the survey, seven in 10 respondents were actively looking for a new job.As for how far they’d go to get it, 13 percent would compromise on health care.Meanwhile, 16 percent said they’d relinquish some vacation or personal time to work for another employer, while one in four conceded they’d work more hours.Twenty percent would take less pay to work elsewhere, and 19 percent said they’d accept either no bonus, or one that was reduced.The survey also reveals that 30 percent would adhere to a strict dress code at a new job, 28 percent said they’d commute a longer distance, and 26 percent were willing to accept a smaller office or desk space.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

No More Pencils, No More Books — It’s All About Computers in Classrooms

No More Pencils, No More Books — It’s All About Computers in Classrooms

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If it hasn’t happened already, your kids will one day ask why notebooks, pencils and rulers were ever used in the classroom.As of now, there are about 13.2 million computing devices in primary and secondary schools in the U.S., according to Education Market Research, which conducted a survey last spring.The survey puts the number of desktops at 4.7 million, laptops at 3.9 million, and tablets at 2.3 million.Meanwhile, there are estimated one million Chromebooks in grades K-12.In other developments, EMR predicts that tablet spending is on pace to increase by 8.6 percent during the upcoming school year.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Judge Rejects $324.5 Million Apple-Google Hiring Settlement

Judge Rejects $324.5 Million Apple-Google Hiring Settlement

iStock/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) –  A federal judge tossed a proposed $324.5 million settlement involving hiring practices of Apple Inc. and Google Inc. in Silicon Valley, officials announced Friday. The class-action antitrust case claimed the tech giants made an agreement not to hire each others’ employees, the New York Times reports. Judge Lucy H. Koh said there was evidence the companies were involved in “an overarching conspiracy” against their employees, rejecting a proposed deal from April in which 64,000 class members were set to receive an estimated $4,000 each.Koh claimed the case was stronger than the initial proposal and promoted another trial, unless an additional approved settlement is reached.
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Toyota Says ‘We’re Football Fans Too,’ Won’t Show On-Field Ads

Toyota Says ‘We’re Football Fans Too,’ Won’t Show On-Field Ads

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — When the NFL pre-season officially kicked off this week, some fans were shocked to see giant on-field advertising by the likes of Toyota. These weren’t just perimeter ads you see on the sides of football stadiums, but giant lettering and letters digitally added to the red zone.The advertising was evident on Thursday, when the Baltimore Ravens played the San Francisco 49ers, whose “exclusive auto partner” is Toyota.When the teams played between the end zone and the 20-yard line, giant red letters showing “Toyota Red Zone” appeared on the field under players’ feet at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.”I have seen TV ads during NFL games. I have seen graphics displayed on the field during NFL games. I have not seen anything quite like this from the Niners broadcast (through the NFL Network) before,” wrote SB Nation contributor Seth Rosenthal.Brian McCarthy, a spokesman for the NFL, told ABC News that the on-field advertising will take place during the pre-season only.”No league network partner is able to do this. This will not be during the regular season,” he said. “Teams are responsible for their pre-season telecasts.”Sona Iliffe-Moon, a spokeswoman for Toyota, told ABC News that the car manufacturer won’t show the “Toyota Red Zone” anymore during the pre-season.”We’re football fans too. We’ve heard fan feedback and it’s not our intention to distract from the joy of the game,” she said. “Toyota will continue to be a strong supporter of the 49ers as part of our multi-year partnership and we’re working to ensure that future brand mentions won’t distract from game play. During the remainder of the 49ers’ pre-season games, fans and viewers should no longer see the Toyota Red Zone once the ball is snapped.”
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Small Businesses Feel the Make-or-Break Power of Yelp

Small Businesses Feel the Make-or-Break Power of Yelp

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — It was the Yelp review that led to Yelp revenge.After wedding guest Rabih Zahnan stayed the Union Street Guest House in Hudson, New York, for a friend’s wedding, he turned to the business-review website Yelp to write about what he thought was an abysmal stay.“There was a musty order, it smelled bad, we kept the windows open for the entire time we were there,” Zahnan told Nightline.But the Guest House fought back. Zahnan said he received an email from the inn saying there would be a $500 fine to the bride and groom for each negative review posted online by them or their guests.The bride and groom apparently overlooked the fine print in their wedding contract put forth by the guest house, which said, “a $500 fine will be deducted from your deposit for every negative review of USGH placed on any internet site by anyone in your party.”As the story went viral this week, a collective consumer fury ensued, and the inn’s star rating on Yelp plummeted to a dismal 1.5 out of 5 stars as a barrage of users posted angry, and clearly facetious, reviews about the business. One person even called it “the worst hotel in history.”Over the last few years, the Yelp review has taken on a life on its own, and has truly become make-or-break for businesses nationwide.“Sometimes, one bad review can really destroy your business,” said Barry Butterfield, who owns a bed and breakfast around the corner from the Guest House. “You can lose thousands of dollars.”In fact, over 50 million businesses worldwide occupy a presence on Yelp. A Harvard business school study found that even a one-star rating increase on Yelp translates to a sales increase of 5 to 9 percent.But bad reviews can actually come back to bite the consumer. Some businesses threaten fines and even lawsuits over bad reviews.“These lawsuits are a form of bullying,” said Evan Mascagni, the policy director for the Public Participation Project, an organization that raises awareness about strategic lawsuits against public participation. “It’s a tactic to silence your critics.”James Demetriades owns the Landing Resort and Spa in Lake Tahoe. He admits to reading online reviews of his hotel all the time, but he took issue with the one comment he said went too far.“In one case we had an individual who made extremely derogatory remarks about the manager, about the restaurant, about the food, about myself individually,” Demetriades said. “We decided to file suit against this person for defamation.”Court records reveal the case was settled out of court with no money exchanged.Business owners say that it’s the consumers writing the reviews who have all the power. But Demetriades says it’s Yelp who has the real power. He said he started to notice something strange about the way he said reviews were filtered on Yelp pages for his businesses.“I began to notice at one of our restaurants a series of reviews, and those reviews were suddenly disappearing,” he said.Demetriades said Yelp was filtering out legitimate reviews and also prioritizing reviews from Yelp’s elite users.“Every service business that I know of will have bad reviews. That’s just part of being a business, it’s okay,” he said. “I’m not asking to remove any reviews. All I’m asking for, and I demand, is that people get to see all reviews that are real and legitimate.”He is now suing Yelp in a California court for misrepresenting how well the site filters reviews. But Yelp stands behind their process.“The reason consumers, 138 million of them, come to our site each month is because they trust the content,” said Vince Sollitto, the vice president of corporate communications for Yelp. “The reason they trust the content is because we take steps to protect them from being misled from reviews that are either been purchased by business or might be bias because they were solicited from a business owner’s friends or families.”And Yelp regulators say fake online reviews are a real problem. Yelp recently helped New York’s Attorney General with a year-long undercover investigation dubbed “operation clean turf.” The authorities busted 19 companies who were writing phony reviews or commissioning people to write them. The companies were ordered to pay more than $350,000 in penalties.Some business owners also claim that purchasing ads on Yelp will improve their business’ ranking or circulate more positive reviews. Just this week, a class action lawsuit was filed on behalf of some Yelp shareholders alleging that Yelp was doing just that.Yelp says they have not been served with that suit but said the allegations were “without merit” and will be vigorously contested.Sollitto also said that claims that Yelp is skewing results in favor of business owners who purchase ads on their site are “absolutely not” true.“Businesses purchase advertising on Yelp, but nothing more,” he said. “Our recommendation software is designed to protect consumers and we treat advertisers and non-advertisers equally.”In the wake of the bad review backlash at the Union Street Guest House, Butterfield said “a firestorm” has erupted and that businesses are more aware than ever that “all the money and power is on the side of Yelp.”The Union Street Guest House declined to comment to Nightline, but earlier this week, the owner posted a statement on the inn’s Facebook page saying, “The policy regarding wedding fines was put on our site as a tongue-in-cheek response to a wedding many years ago. It was meant to be taken down long ago and certainly was never enforced.”But contrary to what some business owners might think, Yelp says negative reviews are the exception, not the rule.“I think that the biggest misconception about Yelp is that it’s a site where people go to complain or whine, in fact, 80 percent of all the reviews on Yelp or so, are three stars or more,” Sollitto said. “And that’s because most people’s experiences with small businesses are positive. And that’s really what comes through on Yelp.”
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

GM Advises SUV Owners to Avoid Garages in 60th Recall

GM Advises SUV Owners to Avoid Garages in 60th Recall

General Motors(DETROIT) — General Motors is under scrutiny for yet another round of safety recalls, this time focusing on the power switches of several SUV models that could potentially catch fire when left unattended.
GM is advising owners of select SUVs to park their vehicles outdoors until the problem can be fixed.
Originally issued on June 30, but now updated with the fire risk, this is the third such recall for this group of automobiles, which includes the 2006 and 2007 model Chevy Trailblazer, GMC Envoy, Buick Rainer, Saab 97-X and Isuzu Ascender.
The recall covers approximately 189,000 vehicles, and is the 60th one issued this year.
GM has faced some negative repercussions from the nearly 29 million cars it has called back for automotive issues, including an 80 percent drop in second-quarter profits two weeks ago.
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Singer John Legend Helps His Dad Sell Funky Hats

Singer John Legend Helps His Dad Sell Funky Hats

ABC/Randy Holmes(NEW YORK) — Singer John Legend is known for his Grammy-award winning smooth voice. His dad Ron Stephens is now known for his line of “out-of-thebox” hats called Popz Topz.
Legend, whose real name is John Stephens, helped his dad sell the hats at the 2014 Ford Neighborhood Awards in Atlanta on Friday.
Stephens, from Sprinfield, Ohio, said he first began putting different hats together to wear himself.
He took an old straw hat and cut off the brim; he then attached a baseball cap’s brim, which he encased in black leather, the Springfield News-Sun reports.
“As Ron remixed each hat and began sporting them around town, family and friends were so impressed they began encouraging him to take them to the marketplace,” the Popz Topz website states.
Stephens started Popz Topz LLC in January 2012 with a business partner, the site states.
“The mission was simple. Create a look for men, women and the up-and-comers that are avant-garde, appealing, adaptable and affordable,” Popz Topz website says.
The wool felt hats are listed for $85 online and the straw hats cost $139.
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Stocks End the Week on a High Note

Stocks End the Week on a High Note

(NEW YORK) — Stocks finished up the week higher despite the United States’ airstrikes in Iraq.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average went up 185.66 points closing at 16,553.93. The Nasdqaq climbed 36.07 points ending the day at 4,371.06, and the S&P 500 went up 22.02 points to 1,931.59.
Economists are saying the great recession is behind us, but plenty of families are still struggling. A federal reserve survey shows that 40% of households say they’re just getting by.
Some McDonalds stores are reporting worse sales in more than 10 years. The company’s global sales are down 2.5%.
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Consumers Fed Up with Robocalls Are Taking Legal Action

Consumers Fed Up with Robocalls Are Taking Legal Action

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Many consumers are ticked off by telemarketers making unwanted calls. They’re the fastest growing type of complaint, according to consumer protection offices around the country. Despite the National Do Not Call Registry and strict rules about robocalls, unwanted telemarketing is still a big nuisance for cellphone users.”We are all bombarded,” says consumer protection attorney Billy Howard. “There are hundreds of thousands of people that are going through this exact same thing and they just don’t know their rights.”Unwanted robocalls to cellphones are illegal under federal law — and companies that place them can be sued.”It’s a $500 minimum violation to every single unwanted call to your cellphone,” Howard says.
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Malaysian Government Plans to Take over Malaysia Airlines

Malaysian Government Plans to Take over Malaysia Airlines

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — To say Malaysian Airlines has had a tumultuous year would be an understatement.
The airline behind two major disasters in five months on Friday morning looks as if it will fall into the hands of its national government.
According to the Financial Times, the proposed buyout through the Malaysian sovereign wealth fund would see the company restructured as part of the rescue plan. Shares of the company could also be delisted from being publicly traded.
Trading of MAS shares have been halted on the public exchange since Monday.
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Which State Has the Fastest Internet Speed?

Which State Has the Fastest Internet Speed?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Virginia is for lovers … of high speed Internet.The southern state boasts the fastest connection in the United States, according to Broadview Networks.Rounding out the top five are Delaware, Massachusetts, Rhode Island …

FICO’s New Model Could Boost Your Credit Score

FICO’s New Model Could Boost Your Credit Score

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Having a hard time getting a loan? You may soon find relief.Credit scoring company FICO announced on Thursday it will no longer include records of previously outstanding bills in consumers’ credit reports. The measure will make it easier for many people to increase their borrowing ability by providing a boost to their credit scores.
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

How Drones Will Replace Humans in the Workplace

How Drones Will Replace Humans in the Workplace

iStock/Thinktock(NEW YORK) — Drones are everywhere these days. They have replaced professional photographers at weddings, aided farmers mapping crops, assisted on movie shoots, and one day, they might even deliver your mail.They’re also increasingly affordable. A popular drone model for civilians costs about $500 on Amazon.But could the gadgets really become as ubiquitous as smartphones? And if so, is your job at risk?Maybe if you’re a cargo pilot for FedEx or UPS, said Mary Cummings, a drone expert who teaches at MIT and Duke University.“Drones will augment the delivery world,” Cummings told ABC News. “And one could argue that they would be much more environmentally friendly since they could take cars off the road for last mile delivery and help reduce congestion.”She said cargo planes used for deliveries will become drones in the next 10 to 20 years.
Crop dusters might also find their risky work outsourced. And it’s about time, Cummings added.“These jobs should be turned over to drones immediately,” she said. “Crop dusting is the most dangerous job in general aviation with a high accident rate. Drones can not only do that job better, but much safer.”Cummings predicts police and traffic helicopters will also one day be replaced by drones.But people shouldn’t worry too much about drones stealing their jobs. The technology will also lead to new jobs. For example, Cummings bets robot maintenance will be a booming business in the future.For now, until the FAA eases regulations, personal drones are mostly for fun. A drone recently filmed a fraternity party, and Martha Stewart is also in on the action, sharing photos online that a drone took of her farm.Drones can go beyond personal videos and photos — the options are endless, as Cummings points out. Facebook has reportedly expressed interest in using drones to provide worldwide Internet, an Arizona sheriff has mused about flying them above jails and the University of Missouri Journalism School is offering a course in how to use drones to report stories.“Ultimately, drones will create more jobs than they replace, they will save lives, and they will give us capabilities we only dream about — like everyone owning our own flying cars,” Cummings said.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Why You Might Not Have to Fear Robots

Why You Might Not Have to Fear Robots

iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Mass.) — Visions of robot wars and an apocalyptic future dominate imaginations. For instance, billionaire futurist Elon Musk tweeted last weekend that artificial intelligence could be more dangerous than nuclear weapons.While it’s a scary thought, Vlad Sejnoha, the chief technology officer with Nuance Communications, a company that works with artificial intelligence, said he’s an “optimist.””I am skeptical this amping up of the fear factor of when it comes to artificial intelligence,” he told ABC News.”If you look at the history of technology, we have been subject to immense changes,” Sejnoha said. “Life would be unrecognizable to a lot of folks who came before us.”Sejnoha shared three ways artificial intelligence is already working to help, not hurt humans.Get What You Want, NowWhether its driving directions, movie reviews or scheduling a time for the cable guy to come by — getting the information you want takes several steps.Why not leave it to an artificially intelligent machine?”One simple idea is you cut through that clutter with simple spoken requests,” Sejnoha said.”You should be able to do that across lots of different devices,” he said. “You could look up a sports score while driving in the car and when you drive home you can tell the TV to turn that exact game on. It could also become your agent to controlling other smart things.”The bottom line: “I think we will have the ability to transact with our surroundings but also get information in very seamless ways,” he said.They Care About Your HealthThere are artificially intelligent systems already being used by doctors, Sejnoha said.”We’re making it possible for doctors to take notes or document the patient encounters, putting those facts into electronic health records and then helping the doctor provide quality care by noticing discrepancies.”An Artificially Intelligent FriendThe movie Her, showed the deep emotional bond a man developed with Samantha, his personal operating system. It’s a scenario that isn’t inconceivable in real life, to an extent, Sejnoha said.”A lot of users form a bond with their virtual assistants. I think its entirely plausible some folks might view them as a companion,” he said. “As we build more and more intelligent systems that can perform more sophisticated tasks, the question is: Should we make them human-like or neutral software tools? There is an argument being made to emulate some human characteristics.” Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Paper Boys in Iowa City Reign Supreme

Paper Boys in Iowa City Reign Supreme

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(CARROLL, Iowa) — During the times before parents worried about everything, a lot of kids, usually boys, had a daily paper route to earn a little spending money for pizza and other sundries.Nowadays paper routes are nearly obsolete, but not in Carroll, Iowa, where the Daily Times Herald is still the newspaper of record. In fact, the publishers depend on youngsters to deliver the Herald every afternoon, five days a week.Kids between the ages of nine and 17 aren’t exactly going to get rich doing it since they only earn ten to 12 cents for each paper they put on someone’s porch or in their mailbox each day. However, the pay is okay in most cases and the hours aren’t long. One deliverer says he’s only outside for 30 minutes.The Daily Times Herald itself is modest in size at 16 pages per edition, but it must be doing something right because in 2013 it received the honor of Iowa’s “Newspaper of the Year.”Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

The Burden of College Debt Just Got Bigger

The Burden of College Debt Just Got Bigger

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There’s no question that carrying a big debt after college can slow down a graduate’s progress in life.However, as reported in The Wall Street Journal, the weight people feel from having to pay off tens of thousands of dollars in loans is much heavier on one’s psychological well-being than anyone previously imagined.Brandon Busteed, executive director of Gallup Education, describes what oppressive college debts means in eight short words, “It’s bad for all aspects of your life.”Busteed, who conducted his poll in conjunction with Purdue University, asked 30,000 college grads from all 50 states to measure their lives in the following five categories: feelings of purpose to their lives, supportive relationships, financial security, a sense of community and physical well-being.They were also asked about their financial situation and loan debt.  People who graduated from 2000 through 2014 with $50,000 or more in unpaid loans rated lower in all five categories than grads who were debt-free.The immediate ramifications from high debt are the need to take a job, perhaps not in one’s field, to pay down the loans; the postponement of getting married and/or buying a house; and stress that affects physical health.Down the road, the inability to save also delays establishing a nest egg for retirement, which only makes people more anxious.Currently, 70 percent of grads are in debt and what’s worse, Busteed says, is that average debt is getting close to $50,000.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

This Cookie Company’s CEO Is 10 Years Old

This Cookie Company’s CEO Is 10 Years Old

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Cory Nieves, a 10-year-old who goes by Mr. Cory, sure knows how to market a product.”My favorite is the chocolate chip,” he told ABC News of the cookies he makes under his company, Mr. Cory’s Cookies. “I come up with all the recipes, and oatmeal raisin has no sugar added.”
He speaks of his expansion plans for the company, including trying to land corporate accounts. Not surprising of a CEO, except this CEO hasn’t even entered the fifth grade yet.
Mr. Cory’s Cookies started in 2009 as a stand selling hot cocoa, cookies, and lemonade, until someone reported his business to the health department.”He was really discouraged and sad, but they also helped him to incorporate the business legally,” Mr. Cory’s mother, Lisa Howard, told ABC News. “Now, he does a lot of events with local car dealerships, hospitals, hair salons, banks and a lot of corporate offices where we live in Englewood, New Jersey.”
Now that it’s summertime, Mr. Cory’s days are booked solid with events, markets and more. Once school returns, Howard spends her days doing his deliveries.”He loves checking his emails. He’s really ongoing with it. He learns math really well with his business more than in school,” Howard said. “Sometimes, the school he goes to incorporates what he does into the curriculum. The kids love it.”
It’s not strictly business for Mr. Cory though.”He enjoys his kid life with playdates,” said Howard, 28. “As he got older, he would say, ‘I love doing the cookie business, mommy. It makes me happy.’ I figure, at the end of the day, running a business is going to teach him structure, how to be a man, how to take his life seriously, how to have morals.”
Looking ahead, Mr. Cory has a simple mission.”It’s really fun and you get to eat a lot of cookies,” he said. “I just want to make it expand and let everyone have cookies.”
Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Rural Italian Town Offers Homes for One Euro

Rural Italian Town Offers Homes for One Euro

iStock/Thinkstock(ROME) — The depopulation of rural Italy has led the village of Gangi to offer homes for one euro.
The tiny town council is hoping that by putting about 20 homes on the market for the cost of roughly $1.34 in the United States, foreigners will snap up the houses.
Just one hitch: buyers have to promise to renovate the homes.
New owners will have to put down another $6,000 as a guarantee that they will renovate the crumbling houses — money they’ll get back once they do.
The stunning hilltop town was founded in the 12th century, features castles and hiking trails, and is only an hour away from the seaside. While Gangi — in Sicily — is not far from the famed mafia town of Corleone, experts say that organized crime is drawn to major construction projects, not giving new life to small, centuries-old dwellings.
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Six-Year-Olds Have More Tech Knowledge Than Adults, Survey Shows

Six-Year-Olds Have More Tech Knowledge Than Adults, Survey Shows

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Children may be more tech-savy than adults.
A survey of nearly 3,000 adults and kids by Britain’s communications regulator Ofcom found that six-year-olds have more technology knowledge than 45-year-olds.
The survery also reports that, after our teenage years, “digital confidence” begins a slow, long decline.
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Dow Loses 75 Points

Dow Loses 75 Points

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Stocks edged lower in Thursday-afternoon trading as investors remained troubled by escalating tensions between Russia and the West over Ukraine. 
The Dow Jones Industrial Average went down 75.07 points to 16,368.27. The Nasdaq lost 20.08 points, closing at 4,334,.97, while the S&P 500 lost 10.67 points, ending the day at 1,909.57.
Fewer people sought jobless benefits last week, as jobless claims remain at relatively low levels. The Labor Department says weekly applications for unemployment fell 14,000, to a seasonally adjusted 289,000.
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