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A Romantic Kiss Is a Bacteria Nightmare, Say Researchers

A Romantic Kiss Is a Bacteria Nightmare, Say Researchers

Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Despite what the song “As Time Goes By” claims, a kiss is a lot more than just a kiss. 

Researchers in the Netherlands analyzed the oral bacterial profile of 26 couples before and after an intimate kiss and found that 80 million bacteria are transferred during the average 10-second smooch.The researchers also found that the saliva of couples have more similar bacteria than non-couples, and couples who kiss more frequently share the most oral bacteria.A side note: 75 percent of the men involved in the study reported higher kiss frequencies than their female partners, suggesting that guys over-report their sexual behaviors.The study was published in the journal Microbiome.

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Coffee May Decrease Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee May Decrease Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — An apple a day keeps the doctor away, and now new research shows a cup of coffee a day may help keep type 2 diabetes away.The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee says new research shows three to four cups of coffee each day lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent, compared to those who drank two cups or less.But wait, there's more. For every additional cup of joe consumed, a person earns another seven- to eight-percent reduced risk.Researchers still don't know why coffee lowers the risk, but it may be connected to antioxidants. The researchers note that our bodies appear to have a better glucose tolerance with high coffee consumption. And it has little connection to caffeine because decaf appears to have a greater protective effect than regular coffee.There are 29.1 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes and an estimated 8.1 million Americans undiagnosed.Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases and is linked with obesity and physical inactivity. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented through healthy food choices, physical activity, weight loss, and now possibly coffee.The study was published in Medical Daily.

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New Tool May Predict Your Risk of Heart Disease

New Tool May Predict Your Risk of Heart Disease

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — Most people would want to know if they have an increased risk of a heart attack, and now researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health have developed an online tool that may help individuals predict their risk as well as help them learn how lifestyle choices influence the danger.The researchers examined health data from approximately 100,000 people over 20 years to develop a risk model. They then developed a 5-minute online assessment tool called The Healthy Heart Score to illustrate how a person’s diet, exercise level, and habits play a role in heart disease risk.The tool asks users a series of questions about their lifestyle, such as “Do you smoke cigarettes?” and “During the past year, how often, on average, do you eat a serving of fruit?” Users receive a risk score of low, moderate, or high, along with tips for improvement.The score is based on nine critical diet and lifestyle factors that can impact a person’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the next 20 years.  The factors include smoking, weight, exercise, and intake of alcohol, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, sugary beverages, and red and processed meat.Medical observers note this is the first tool of its kind designed to help otherwise healthy individuals and their doctors determine long-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease.The study was published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Research Shows People Who Cook at Home Eat Healthier

Research Shows People Who Cook at Home Eat Healthier

Photodisc/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Nothing beats home cooking for taste, and now new research shows a home-cooked meal tends to be healthier than the food you find on menus.Researchers at Johns Hopkins examined national survey data from over 9,000 adults and found that individuals who eat more home-cooked meals during the week consume fewer carbohydrates, fats, and sugar than those who eat out more.The study also found that people who cooked more at home consumed fewer daily calories, ate fewer frozen meals and ate more fiber than those who ate more meals prepared outside of the home.Medical experts note that the results of the study were obtained via a survey, with participants asked to recall each item consumed during each meal. As a result, some of the data may be inaccurate due to poor recall or incorrect reporting.

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National Unfriend Day: Why It’s OK for Facebook Users to Slim Down Your Friends

National Unfriend Day: Why It’s OK for Facebook Users to Slim Down Your Friends

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — What started as a silly holiday by Jimmy Kimmel a few years ago has turned into an annual occurrence every Nov. 17, when participating Facebook users take a good hard look at their friends list and choose people to unfriend.If the idea of getting rid of that guy you went to camp with 14 years ago and never talk to or your over sharing aunt gives you pause, know that you have a social media etiquette expert's blessing."Just because you unfriend someone doesn't mean that it is a negative move," Diane Gottsman, an etiquette expert author and founder of The Protocol School of Texas, told ABC News. "Sometimes we just need to cull our list or redirect to them to another site or venue."With more than 1.3 billion users on Facebook, many users have had the experience of receiving a friend request from an old elementary school classmate or a college ex-boyfriend, making friends lists even more bloated."Relationships change," Gottsman said. "Not that you're being ugly but there just sometimes is not a reason to continue that relationship or let them have a window into the world.”When it comes to nixing relatives from your friends list, Gottsman said it's best to "use your judgement.""You have to weigh the annoyance. Is it going to be worse when you unfriend? Will it be more drama than its worth?If hiding their posts won't suffice and they're still annoying you -- it's OK to unfriend them, she said.When it's all done, you'll be left with a slimmed down friends list full of people with whom you actually care to stay connected."It’s like a bite," Gottsman said. "A little cat bite it will hurt for a second but they will get over it."

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Workplace Bathrooms Are Beehives of Activity

Workplace Bathrooms Are Beehives of Activity

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you thought your workplace bathroom was being used only for what it was designed for, you’d be wrong, according to a new survey by SCA, a Swedish global hygiene company.The company’s “Hygiene Matters” survey asked 13,000 people from 13 countries, including 1,058 people from the U.S., about their bathroom habits at work.Here are the results:

25 percent of Americans head to the stalls to text, while a slightly lower number, 23 percent, go to make a phone call. Five percent visit the bathroom to smoke, while another five percent go there with the intention of napping. Seven percent manage to exercise in the restroom. Eight percent admit they head to the restroom to eat. 10 percent of respondents visit the company restroom to cry. Broken down by gender, 14 percent of women and six percent of men admitted doing so. 23 percent of the women surveyed say they go to the workplace restroom to "deal with the frustration of everyday work life,” compared to 17 percent of men. 21 percent of guys use “the space to spend a moment alone or get space from colleagues," compared to 18 percent of the women. 10 percent of Americans only "sometimes" wash their hands after taking care of business. One percent says they never do. More than 40 percent of the U.S. respondents also say they don't clean their hands at all after getting to work. 87 percent of Americans expressed general satisfaction with workplace washrooms, with 13 percent claiming they'd rather use their employer's bathroom than the one they have at home. According to the survey, folks in China, Italy, and Russia are the least thrilled with their bathroom conditions at work.

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Complications from Premature Birth Number One Cause of Death in Young Children

Complications from Premature Birth Number One Cause of Death in Young Children

Photodisc/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the London School of Hygiene found that premature birth is the number one killer of babies worldwide.In a study published in the journal Lancet, 2013 marks the first years in which preterm birth is the top cause of death for young children. The overall number of early childhood deaths decreased from 2000 to 2013, reaching six million in 2013. One million of those died from complications from prematurity.Other notable causes of death among young children were pneumonia, diarrheal infections, malaria and complications during pregnancy.Researchers urged pregnant mothers to seek earlier medical care in an effort to prevent preterm birth.

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Study: Energy Drinks Dangerous for Young Children

Study: Energy Drinks Dangerous for Young Children

Mauro Matacchione/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A study presented at a meeting of the American Heart Association found that energy drinks may be extremely dangerous for young children.According to data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers, more than 40 percent of reports about energy drinks to U.S. poison control centers involved children younger than six years old. The brain and heart were most frequently affected organs.Steven Lipshultz, M.D., and chair of pediatrics at Wayne State University said that "energy drinks have no place in pediatric diets."The data showed 5,156 cases of energy drink exposure, 40 percent of which involved young children who were not expected to be drinking the drinks.

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Court Rules Canadian Girl Cannot Be Forced to Have Chemotherapy

Court Rules Canadian Girl Cannot Be Forced to Have Chemotherapy

VILevi/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(ONTARIO, Canada) -- A Canadian court has ruled that the family of a 11-year-old girl with cancer cannot be forced to treat her with chemotherapy.The girl is a member of the Six Nations tribe of American Indians and has been suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In September, the girl's mother stopped treatment after just 10 days and took the girl to a holistic healing center in Florida.McMaster Children's Hospital, which was treating the girl in Ontario, Canada, asked Brant Family Children's Services to intervene and bring the girl back from Florida for treatment.When BFCS refused, the hospital took the organization to court in an effort to force it to bring the girl back to Canada.McMaster Children's Hospital President Dr. Peter Fitzgerald said with chemotherapy the girl had a 90 percent to 95 percent chance for survival.Ontario Court Justice Gethin Edward ruled Friday that the girl could not be forced by BFCS to be treated with chemotherapy, the Toronto Star reported.Edward ruled Friday that the court could not intervene due to the family's aboriginal rights under the Canadian constitution.Andrew Koster, the family's attorney, said it was the family's right to choose their daughter's treatment."This wasn't a one-time blood transfusion such as in a Jehovah Witness situation," Koster said. "This was going to be two years of chemo. Does that mean we take this child away for two years and suppose she didn't make it?"Chiefs of tribal reserves neighboring the girl's applauded the decision."It reaffirms our right to be Indian and to practice our medicines in the traditional way," said Chief Bryan Laforme of the Mississaugas of New Credit, which is a neighboring reserve.After the ruling, Hamilton Health Sciences, the medical group that oversees McMaster Children's hospital, said in a statement they remained "committed to support this child's treatment with compassion and respect.""Our motivation has always been and remains that this child receives life-saving medical treatment in a timely manner," read a portion of the statement.

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More than 30 Cases of Viral Meningitis Documented at University of Maryland

More than 30 Cases of Viral Meningitis Documented at University of Maryland

UmerPK/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(COLLEGE PARK, Md.) -- More than 30 cases have been documented in an outbreak of viral meningitis at the University of Maryland since mid-October.According to the University of Maryland Health Center, the school is aware of 31 confirmed or suspected cases of the disease among their 37,000 students. About 19 of those 31 have been hospitalized for treatment. The outbreak began in October, the school says. While being careful to note that the outbreak is confirmed to be viral meningitis and not bacterial meningitis -- which is more dangerous -- the school's statement urged students to frequently wash their hands, stay home and rest if feeling unwell, clean surfaces that are touched frequently and avoiding kissing and sharing glasses and utensils.Symptoms of the disease include fever, headache, light sensitivity and a stiff neck.

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‘Extremely Ill’ Ebola Patient Expected to Arrive in Nebraska Saturday

‘Extremely Ill’ Ebola Patient Expected to Arrive in Nebraska Saturday

Photo by Eric Francis/Getty Images(OMAHA, Neb.) -- Martin Salia, the surgeon being flown from West Africa to Nebraska for treatment for Ebola, may be in worse shape than the previous patients successfully treated in the United States, the hospital says.Salia will be the third Ebola patient treated at Nebraska Medical Center since the summer. He is expected to arrive there on Saturday afternoon. According to a statement from the hospital, the medical flight crew that is transporting the patient has evaluated him and determined that "although he is extremely ill, his condition was stable enough for him to make the lengthy flight to Omaha." "We immediately started preparing the unit and notifying staff members of this possibility," Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the Nebraska Medical Center Biocontainment Unit said. "We've obviously been through this a couple of times before so we know what to expect...Our staff has had a break since treating our last patient, so I know we're ready to go."Dr. Rick Sacra and NBC journalist Ashoka Mukpo were previously treated at Nebraska Medical Center. Both have since recovered.

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Why Some People Are Always Late

Why Some People Are Always Late

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- New York City's Mayor Bill de Blasio is notorious being for constantly being late, but the politician's chronic tardiness made headlines this week when he was so late to a memorial service for 265 people who died in a plane crash that they held the moment of silence without him.The mayor later apologized and blamed a "rough night" and fog that slowed his Police Department boat that took him to Queens for the anniversary of a 2001 plane crash, but he left people irked with his persistent lateness.De Blasio's inability to be on time mirrors many other people with lower profiles than the mayor of the country's largest city.Time management expert Julie Morgenstern told ABC News there are two main types of perpetrators: people who are routinely 10 or 15 minutes late, and people whose lateness varies.If people are always late by the same amount of time, the problem might be psychological, said Morgenstern, who is not a doctor but has extensive experience studying time management."If you think about it, they're precise," she said. "They always arrive exactly 10 minutes late. If you're always late by the same amount of time, you have to realize you're arriving at the exact time you want to. There is some sort of fear or discomfort of down time. There's a lot of anxiety about sitting around and doing nothing."

The fix? Set a goal to be early -- instead of just on time -- and give yourself an incentive. If you're 10 minutes early to dinner, that time can be spent browsing Instagram or shopping online on your smartphone, for example.The other group of latecomers has a bigger problem with managing their time, said Morgenstern, author of "Time Management from the Inside Out.""It typically means you're really bad at estimating how long things take," she said. "You think, maybe I'll do this quick thing or take this call, and you end up running over."This type of person doesn't necessarily mean to be late. They just think a quick stop by the post office won't make them late to lunch, when in reality it's out of the way and there could be a long line, for example."I've had clients tell me, 'Even when I'm on time getting somewhere, I find myself adding something and then I'm not on time anymore,'" she said.Morgenstern said those people need to pay attention to how long things really take, and also learn how to say no."If the phone rings when you're walking out the door, just keep going and don't stop," she said.

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How Rules May Loosen for Gay Blood Donors

How Rules May Loosen for Gay Blood Donors

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A ban that has prohibited gay men from donating blood in the United States may be loosened after more than three decades, although not enough to totally satisfy all gay rights activists.The Department of Health and Human Service’s Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability recommended Thursday changing the policy that bans men who have had sex with other men since 1977 from donating blood.The committee voted 16 to 2 to recommend allowing gay and bisexual men to donate blood if they have abstained from sex with men for at least one year.Gay and bisexual men have been banned from donating blood by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration since 1983 after doctors realized the AIDS virus could be transmitted through blood transfusions.The news was cheered by major blood banks and transfusion medicine associations including the American Red Cross, America’s Blood Centers and AABB, a nonprofit representing institutions and individuals in the transfusion medicine field.In a joint statement, the three organizations said the ban is “medically and scientifically unwarranted.”“We believe all potential donors should be treated with fairness, equality and respect,” a portion of the statement said. “And that accurate donor histories and medically supported donor deferral criteria are critical to the continued safety of blood transfusion.”The recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability will be presented at the FDA’s Blood Products Advisory Committee on Dec. 2, which will discuss making changes to the policy.The new recommendations come after years of mounting pressure from both medical groups and gay rights groups criticizing the ban as being outdated and focused too much on sexual orientation rather than actual risk.The American Medical Association voted last year to oppose the FDA ban and recommended evaluating gay men on an individual level for blood donors rather than lumping them together in a high-risk category."The lifetime ban on blood donation for men who have sex with men is discriminatory and not based on sound science," AMA board member Dr. William Kobler said in a statement at the time.Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News’ chief health and medical editor, said even if these new screening rules are approved, they are still problematic.“While this represents a change in how donors are currently screened, it still strikes me as discriminatory and not based on risk,” Besser said. “Why should gay men who are not engaging in high-risk sexual activities be forbidden from donating blood? Prospective donors should be screened for risky behavior, not sexual orientation.”Ryan Yezak, the founder of the National Gay Blood Drive, which has fought the ban with annual protests since 2013, said he was heartened by the changes but said there was more work to do.“I think yesterday’s voting in favor of a one year deferral instead of lifetime ban is a huge step in the right direction,” Yezak said. “Our whole goal is eliminating sexual orientation from the blood donation process altogether.”

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Why It May Be Dangerous to Bundle Kids Up in Carseats

Why It May Be Dangerous to Bundle Kids Up in Carseats

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Experts say bundling up children with puffy jackets and thick blankets in carseats can be a bad idea because they can leave them loose in an accident.

Phyllis Larimore with Children's Mercy in Kansas City says babies should be tucked in with a blanket, but not near the head, to avoid obstructing air flow around the face.

Larimore also said down-filled coats can be dangerous if they leave a gap between the harness and the baby."What will happen in a crash is that crash force will collapse that, compress it, and the babies will be loose," Larimore said."

According to Larimore, better options are an extra layer of clothes, a blanket, or a Thinsulate jacket.

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Bret Michaels Returns to Performing After ‘2-Week Painful Ordeal’

Bret Michaels Returns to Performing After ‘2-Week Painful Ordeal’

Sonja Flemming/CBS ©2013 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved. (NEW YORK) -- Bret Michaels has resumed his tour.

The singer had been sidelined after undergoing kidney surgery and being hospitalized six times in two weeks.

"Jacksonville here I come! I’m going to try and gives y’all I got!" he wrote Thursday on his website. "Thanks to everyone for all your well wishes and prayers and to all the great medical staff that helped me through a two week painful ordeal. Got more in my right kidney, but let’s deal with that later. Again thanks to all!"

Michaels, 51, had two stents put in his body recently, according to his friend and guitarist, Pete Evick, but hurt himself by performing immediately after the procedure. As a result, he was hospitalized and was forced to miss a charity event where he'd planned to perform. Luckily, he healed quickly, and was able to resume his tour in time to make his concerts in Florida.

"Bret Michaels survived the first show back and although in obvious pain he rocked the party, stating he was happy to be there in Jacksonville!" his team added on his website.

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Fifth Birthday Bittersweet for Girl Losing Ability to Speak

Fifth Birthday Bittersweet for Girl Losing Ability to Speak

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The O'Neills' birthday celebration for their 5-year-old will be bittersweet this weekend. When they launched their fundraising campaign to find a cure for her disease nearly a year ago, they said they expected her to lose her ability to speak by this birthday.Eliza can still talk, her father Glenn O'Neill told ABC News, but sometimes the words don't come as easily to her. And she seems to have stopped learning new things in the last three months. Some days, she can rattle off her numbers and the "Happy Birthday" song. Others, she can't."It's the disease beginning to catch up with her," he said. "This disease just kind of taunts you. You don't know when things are coming but you see them happening."Eliza was diagnosed in July 2013 with Sanfilippo syndrome, a genetic disorder that means she lacks an enzyme to break down heparin sulfate, which naturally occurs in cells, causing it to build up over time. This buildup renders cells unable to function properly and can affect everything from sleep to speech to movement. The disease affects about 1 in 70,000 live births, said Doug McCarty, a researcher at Nationwide Children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who has been working on a cure with his colleague, Haiyan Fu.So the O'Neills launched a fundraising campaign to help McCarty and Fu fund a clinical trial for a gene therapy they hope will cure Eliza. They've already raised 1.3 million on a GoFundMe.com page and another $400,000 elsewhere. They hope to raise an additional $500,000 on Eliza's birthday.There's no guarantee the treatment will get approved or work -- or that Eliza will get into the clinical trial -- but Glenn O'Neill said he and his family had to try."If we don't get the trial funded, and we don't get it up and running, the guarantee is that she has no chance," he said.The family has remained in their home for the last six months to keep Eliza from getting sick. They're afraid a virus will prompt a decline in Eliza's condition or disqualify her from the clinical trial when it starts, so Eliza's mother, a pediatrician, left her job, and Eliza and her brother were taken out of school.Glenn O'Neill said the birthday celebration will be in their Columbia, South Carolina, backyard, where he plans to dress like a clown and juggle. He said the family will "turn inward" to cherish Eliza's good days. The future is uncertain, he wrote on the campaign's GoFundMe page."We're trying to do everything we can to keep her as happy and as healthy and as sharp as she can be," he said. "For the next however many months it takes to get to the point where, hopefully, she can be treated."

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Seniors Look for Love Through Speed Dating

Seniors Look for Love Through Speed Dating

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Many of Janice Ledtke’s friends thought she had lost her mind when the 78-year-old New Yorker decided to try out speed dating.“My friends said, ‘What, are you crazy? Why would you do that?’” the Rochester woman recalled.But at her age, Ledtke said she finds it harder and harder to meet new people.“I’m kind of a bit adventurous and I thought that was a new adventure,” she said of trying out speed dating.Ledtke wasn’t the only senior in town looking for love and companionship. At least 29 other people signed up for the speed dating event.All the subjects were followed in a new documentary called The Age of Love. Directed by Steven Loring, the film follows all 30 seniors as they try out speed dating at a special event designed solely for those between the age of 70 and 90.The film was inspired by Loring’s seeing an elderly uncle fall in love for the first time at 79.Loring followed the seniors for months as they prepared to try out speed dating. For some, the event would be the first time they had been out on a “date” with a new person in decades.“Everybody just came to life,” Loring said of the subjects as they prepared for speed dating, some with the same worries about dating as people half their age.“The idea of ‘What if I’m rejected? How do I look? What if they find me boring?’” Loring said of common worries.Dr. Phillip Dines, medical director of Geriatric Psychiatry at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, said when people lose a partner they may want to immediately search for another person to have companionship and love in their lives again.“This is a very significant issue,” Dines said. “They want to have meaning in their life.”But Dines said he warns his patients to be thoughtful in how they go about meeting new people and dating, especially if they just lost a lifelong spouse or partner.For Ledtke, she was able to get three dates from her first round of speed dating and said she’s happy she tried it out.“You know five minutes isn’t very long, but it’s amazing what kind of a judgment you can make,” Ledtke said. “There were a lot of really great guys there.”As for details, she didn't want to elaborate more on what happened. “I don’t want to take the mystery out of the movie,” she said.

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Elisabeth Hasselbeck Reveals She Had an Abdominal Tumor

Elisabeth Hasselbeck Reveals She Had an Abdominal Tumor

ABC(NEW YORK) -- Elisabeth Hasselbeck returned to her post on Fox and Friends Friday after a month away.  She also revealed the surprising reason for her absence."I had a tumor in my abdomen," Hasselbeck explained. "[The] doctor said, 'Look, you've got to get it out by the end of the month. We don't like how it looks.' I was facing something that potentially could have gone either way.""I did what they said, had a phenomenal surgeon, and I had a scary week where we didn't know what the results were, but I'm okay," she went on. "Everything came back okay. Surgery's not fun, but it is necessary to find out if you have something really terrible in you or not. And thankfully I had the blessing of it not being cancer."Along with thanking Fox, the former View co-host thanked her husband, Tim, for his support and for being her "hospital buddy."She added, "I'm not a person who thinks or believes that I take a lot for granted, but I certainly don't take it for granted now."

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Why People Cry When They’re Happy

Why People Cry When They’re Happy

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW HAVEN, Conn.) — Crying is a normal response when something terrible or sad has occurred. Yet, crying also happens during times of joy or pleasant surprises. Who hasn’t shed tears during a dramatic movie or TV show that ends on an upbeat note? The same can happen to a parent when a child returns from college or the military or to an athlete whose performance turns a certain loss into a shocking victory.Yale psychologist Oriana Aragon decided to investigate why people display negative reactions such as crying at positive events. In one experiment, she discovered that people who pinch cute baby’s cheeks, which is certainly not pleasant for the infant, are usually the type who also cry during graduations.Aragon concluded that these negative reactions “seem to take place when people are overwhelmed with strong positive emotions, and people who do this seem to recover better from those strong emotions.”Clearly, people who cry when they’re happy probably don’t know why they do it but as Aragon explains, it likely helps them avoid more extreme forms of emotion.

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Genetic Experts Still Puzzled by Longevity of World’s Oldest People

Genetic Experts Still Puzzled by Longevity of World’s Oldest People

iStock/Thinkstock(STANFORD, Calif.) — Since there are fewer than 75 supercentenarians in the world, scientists want to know the secret of their longevity.Alas, they’re going to have to keep searching for the answer even after the genes of 17 people older than 110-years-old were sequenced.It turns out that despite a painstaking decoding effort, scientists were unable to find genes that are associated with an extremely long life span.Stanford University genetics expert Stuart Kim, the study’s co-author, says nonetheless there’s likely a strong genetic component to longevity.He and co-author Stephen Coles from the Gerontology Research Group in Los Angeles went ahead and published the results anyway in the event that others doing similar research might be able to unlock the secret of supercentenarians.

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