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New Dating App Vows to Eliminate Creepy Users

New Dating App Vows to Eliminate Creepy Users

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new iPhone dating app claims to be the first of its kind to punish users who misbehave or seem more like spectators than real-world daters.“My female friends were receiving anything from graphic images to downright hostile comments for absolutely no reason,” said Cliff Lerner, CEO of the company behind The Grade. “I thought to myself, there’s got to be a way to build a product where users are accountable for their actions.”The Grade, which launched Monday, allows a user to swipe to "like" a profile. If you find a match, then you can start messaging.The difference from the competition, Lerner said, is that users' interactions are monitored so the site can assess grades.“We use a sophisticated algorithm that scans messages for inappropriate content,” Lerner said. “Users are then graded based on popularity, compelling messages and frequency of response.”Grades are visible to all users. Daters with D grades receive warnings. Daters with Fs can be booted from the app altogether. New users get a grade of pending until a profile is created and they become active.Those with poor grades have one to two weeks to improve their performance. Otherwise, the profile is removed and the user can appeal to the app operators.“We believe we are the first to ever offer this function,” Lerner said. “Our ultimate goal is to create a community of high-quality, articulate daters. We’re committed to expelling low-quality users, not just because someone is offensive, but based on how responsive they are to others.”Frequent dating app user Christiana Padovano, 22, of New York City, said she's willing to give it a try.“When I go on, I’m looking to meet a decent person -- someone that I can have a good time with,” she said.In the past, prospective daters have bombarded Padovano with inappropriate sexual comments, to the point where she decided to unplug for a while.“I deleted my app for three months because I couldn’t deal with the obnoxious messages anymore,” said Padovano. "Now, you’ll find out beforehand so you won’t waste your time.”

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Why E-Smokers Are Rejoicing over 2014 Word of the Year

Why E-Smokers Are Rejoicing over 2014 Word of the Year

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- "Vape" is the Oxford English Dictionary's word of the year.If you’re a little hazy on the meaning, it means to inhale and exhale the vapor produced by an electronic cigarette device, which are themselves also sometimes known as vapes. The word was coined as a way of distancing the act of e-smoking from the act of smoking combustible tobacco cigarettes, the OED said in a statement Tuesday.Vapers -- the people who puff away on e-smokes -- are feeling pretty good about their pastime officially entering the lexicon. They've taken to Twitter and other social media sites to celebrate.Word of the year honors were a long time coming for vape. Though the word was just added to the OED's online site this year, electronic cigarettes have been around since the 1960s and the term first came into use around 1980.Vaping, the activity, didn't really catch on until a decade or so ago but now there are more than 250 brands of "e-cigarettes" available in a variety of flavors, including watermelon, pink bubble gum and java.The Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association estimates that about four million Americans now use battery-powered cigarettes. They project sales of the devices to cross the one billion mark by the end of this year.Vape beat out words such as "bae," a term of endearment for a romantic partner, and "slacktivism," which describes getting involved in social causes without expending too much effort.

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Toddlers Who Were Preemies Have Special Picnic

Toddlers Who Were Preemies Have Special Picnic

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- It's hard to believe the toddlers walking around the park on tiny, wobbly feat were born at 36 weeks, 33 weeks, 24 weeks.These children were born too early, but on the day of Baylor University Medical Center's preemie reunion, they were doing just fine.It's always a joy just to watch the children color at the reunion after having seen them when they weighed only one or two pounds at birth, said Dr. Vijay Nama, medical director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

Families spend weeks or months in the hospital depending on how early their children were born, and as a result, they form a special bond with the nurses and doctors who took care of their newborns."It's almost like you don't just meet them in the hospital," Nama said. "You know them as a family."These toddlers are among the 1 in 9 children in the United States who are born premature, according to March of Dimes.The reunion is tied to World Prematurity Day, which, according to March of Dimes, is a day to raise awareness about the 15 million babies a year who are born before their due dates around the globe.Nama said babies born earlier than 37 weeks gestation are considered premature. The tiniest babies, born between 23 and 27 weeks, have the most difficult road ahead. Like most premature babies, their lungs aren't fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the less developed it is. As a result, these babies need to be given respiratory support until their lungs can work on their own.After 27 weeks, the preemies' road is a little easier, Nama said, but on average, they still stay in the hospital until what would have been their due dates.He said the hospital staff hears from former patients long after they leave the hospital -- either on the phone or through Facebook. And the mothers form their own support groups while they wait for their babies to be healthy enough to leave the hospital.Prematurity can be caused by a number of factors, including having twins or triplets, an infection in the womb, pregnancy-induced hypertension or a separation of the placenta from the uterus wall. But sometimes, the uterus can begin contracting for no reason at all, Nama said.Although technology has made advancements for preemies over the years, Nama said the biggest tool doctors have learned to use is the mothers themselves. Breast milk and skin-to-skin contact are just as good as or better than much of the medicine in his arsenal."The biggest advancement we've made is really the involvement of the family," he said.Although he couldn't make it to the reunion this year, he usually attends to see the families whose children are only a few months old or up to 6 years old."It's fun to watch them," he said. "Really when you see them weighing one or two pounds, and now they're trying to do painting. ...Imagine when you first see them when they're born."

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UCLA Researchers Announce Gene Therapy Cure for 18 ‘Bubble Baby’ Patients

UCLA Researchers Announce Gene Therapy Cure for 18 ‘Bubble Baby’ Patients

Courtesy Padilla-Vacarro family(LOS ANGELES) — Researchers at UCLA announced Tuesday that they had cured 18 children who were born with the so-called Bubble Baby disease, a genetic disorder that leaves the young sufferers without a working immune system, putting them at risk of death from infections, even the common cold.A team led by Dr. Donald Kohn, a stem cell researcher at the university’s Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research in Los Angeles, developed the breakthrough that cured 18 children who had adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).“All of the children with SCID that I have treated in these stem cell clinical trials would have died in a year or less without this gene therapy, instead they are all thriving with fully functioning immune systems,” Kohn, a professor of pediatrics and of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics in the life sciences at UCLA, said in a statement.There are several forms of SCID. About 15 percent of all SCID patients are ADA-deficient.Kohn spent more than 30 years of research on finding the cure, UCLA said Tuesday when it announced the cure. Kohn and his team tested two therapy regimens on the children over the course of two multi-year clinical trials since 2009, UCLA said.During the trials, the children's blood stem cells were removed from their bone marrow and genetically modified to correct the defect. All of the 18 patients -- who ranged in age from 3 months to 4 years at the time of treatment -- were cured without any side effects, UCLA said.The breakthrough has meant a cure for Evangelina Padilla-Vaccaro, who was born with the condition in 2012. Evangelina’s fraternal twin, Annabella, was not affected.The girls’ mother, Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro, of Corona, Calif., said she had a strong sense that something was wrong with Evangelina just a week after giving birth.Despite having been told that she was experiencing the stress of being a new mother, Padilla-Vaccaro persisted.“I just knew something was wrong with my Evangelina,” she told ABC News.Her fear was later confirmed. The twins’ father, Christian Vaccaro, said he and his wife were devastated to get the diagnosis when Evangelina was just six weeks old.Evangelina had to be kept in isolation at home. Only immediate family could come into contact with her, and they had to shower immediately prior and wear a mask and gown to hold her.Kohn said the condition is rare and the affected children “look fine at birth” despite not having a functioning immune system.Patients born with ADA-deficient SCID must be kept in isolation to protect them from germs. If left untreated, the condition could be fatal within the first year of life, according to UCLA.The standard treatment for this condition is a bone marrow transplant, but Angelina wasn't a match for her sister. Evangelina qualified for a clinical trial that used the gene therapy.“It's their own cells so it's a perfect match,” Kohn told ABC News. “And when it works...they grow a whole immune system, and can lead normal lives.”UCLA said Evangelina's new immune system developed soon after she underwent the treatment, which included chemotherapy. The process took about seven weeks from beginning to end, Padilla-Vaccaro said.The little girl is now able to live a normal life. Her parents can take her to the store, the beach and to the playground, and they are grateful."To finally kiss your child on the lips, to hold her, it’s impossible to describe what a gift that is,” Padilla-Vacarro said. “I gave birth to my daughter, but Dr. Kohn gave my baby life.”According to the NLM, ADA-deficient SCID occurs in an estimated 1 in 200,000 to 1 million newborns worldwide.The next step is to seek FDA approval for the gene therapy, UCLA said.The research also lays the groundwork for a clinical test of gene therapy in the treatment of sickle cell disease. UCLA says trials are set to start next year."We've been working for the last five years to take the success we've had with this stem cell gene therapy for SCID to sickle cell,” said Kohn. “We now have the potential to take the gene that blocks sickling and get it into enough of a patient’s stem cells to block the disease.”

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New App Shows You What 200 Calories Looks Like

New App Shows You What 200 Calories Looks Like

Calorific(NEW YORK) — Think one tiny piece of pie won't sabotage your diet? Thanks to a new app that depicts 200 calories worth of common foods, you can stop kidding yourself.The Calorific app presents 200 calorie serving sizes in clean and simple images, taking the guess work out of portion control."We saw some apps that showed how many calories are in a meal but we thought it would be useful to show the individual foods," said Nic Mulvaney, the British graphic designer who designed the app.The minuscule amount of peanut butter you get for 200 calories is somewhat disheartening. And you can only eat about three quarters of a burger -- hold the bun -- before hitting the 200 calorie threshold. But for an equal number of calories you can chow down on a huge mound of berries, two humongous heads of lettuce or five lemons.To come up with exact portion sizes, Mulvaney and his photographer friend Tim Diacon trawled several nutritional databases and pored over the nutritional information on food packaging. After an epic grocery shopping trip, they spent three days chopping, measuring and photographing more than 140 regularly eaten foods."We kept sneaking bits of the samples so towards the end we got quite sick of eating," Mulvaney said of the app's photo shoot.The free app comes with about 30 food images preloaded, but "unlocking" all the food photos costs $2.99. Some of the foods aren't recognizable to many Americans but Mulvaney said they plan to add many more in the near future.

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Lady Transforms into Dudes for Men’s Health Awareness

Lady Transforms into Dudes for Men’s Health Awareness

Van Lokey-Saltzman(DALLAS) — Men aren’t the only ones rocking a mustache in honor of the Movember men’s health awareness movement.For the past two Novembers, Dallas-based artist Van Lokey-Saltzman has transformed herself into a series of mustachioed menfolk so realistic even her own mother didn’t recognize her in the photos.“It started out as a goof where I would put on a pink or purple 'stache,” Lokey-Saltzman said. “But then I started doing more realistic ones to see if I could make myself disappear into the pictures.”Lokey-Saltzman, who said she was also motivated by a family member’s illness, does all of the makeup and wardrobe herself. She then takes pictures on her iPhone and posts them to her Facebook page.“The response has been overwhelming,” she said. “But a lot of people don’t believe it’s me or they think I’ve manipulated the images with Photoshop, in some way.”Lokey-Saltzman isn’t sure she will repeat her Movember masquerade again next year but she said is happy her photos have generated publicity for a good cause.

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Parents Wary of Children in Day Care Who Weren’t Vaccinated

Parents Wary of Children in Day Care Who Weren’t Vaccinated

iStock/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — Parents who make sure their young children receive up-to-date vaccinations are wary of other adults who won't take their kids in for shots.In fact, a University of Michigan study says that 75 percent of parents would consider yanking their child out of day care upon learning others in the class had not been vaccinated.As it happens, parents have a right to be concerned since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that three out of ten two-year-olds haven't received the vaccines pediatricians recommend.The study of more than 600 adults with youngsters five and under also revealed that 40 percent endorse a day care policy that won't allow under-vaccinated kids in a facility and two out three want to know how many children aren't up to date on vaccinations.However, there is some respect for privacy as just a quarter say they also want names of children who aren't fully vaccinated.

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MyFitnessPal App Not Effective in Helping Users Lose Weight

MyFitnessPal App Not Effective in Helping Users Lose Weight

MyFitnessPal(NEW YORK) -- MyFitnessPal, a smartphone app meant to help users lose weight by improving their diet, may not work quite as well as its more than 50 million registered users hope.According to a study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers looked at data from over 200 overweight or obese patients over a span of six months. About half of the participants were assigned routine primary care visits, while the other half received those primary care visits coupled with use of MyFitnessPal.The app allows users to input what food and drinks they ingest each day, with nutritional facts for many foods and drinks available via a search feature. Users can also use the app to chart the amount of exercise they do and the calories that exercise burns to help get a clearer picture of their caloric intake and output.Researchers found, however, that there was no significant difference in amount of weight lost between the two groups, and the overall level of weight loss was minimal. In fact, the study said, many users found the app too time consuming, and ceased using it after about one month. The participants all expressed an interest in losing weight, though their motivation to do so was not quantified.

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Family Blows Out Birthday Candles for Daughter with Fatal Sanfilippo Syndrome

Family Blows Out Birthday Candles for Daughter with Fatal Sanfilippo Syndrome

O'Neill Family(NEW YORK) -- The O'Neills huddled by the window with 5-year-old Eliza to sing "Happy Birthday," but she was so busy watching people sing to her from across the street that she didn't seem to mind when her brother blew her candles out for her.

Eliza and her family haven't left their South Carolina home in six months in the hopes of keeping Eliza virus-free for the magical day that she gets into a clinical trial to cure her rare and deadly disease: Sanfilippo syndrome. The family has raised nearly $2 million to fund the trial.

"Her big brother helped her blow out the candles as we all made our wish," her father, Glenn O'Neill, wrote on the Saving Eliza GoFundMe page. "A wish for LIFE for Eliza and other kids. A wish to stop this disease Sanfilippo syndrome in time."

Eliza was diagnosed in July 2013 with Sanfilippo syndrome, a genetic disorder that means she lacks an enzyme to break down heparin sulfate, which naturally occurs in cells, causing it to build up over time. This buildup renders cells unable to function properly and can affect everything from sleep to speech to movement.

Sanfilippo is terminal and has no treatment. The disease affects about 1 in 70,000 live births, said Doug McCarty, a researcher at Nationwide Children's hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who has been working on a cure with his colleague Haiyan Fu.

So the O'Neills launched a fundraising campaign to help McCarty and Fu fund a clinical trial for a gene therapy they hope will cure Eliza. They've already raised 1.3 million on a GoFundMe.com page and another $400,000 elsewhere. They hoped to raise an additional $500,000 on Eliza's birthday, Nov. 16.

And they're close. A donor Sunday contributed $30,000. They've already raised more than $10,000 this morning alone.

"We have been in tears several times today thanks to your kindness," Glenn O'Neill wrote on the Facebook page. "This is really happening."

The O'Neills aren't the first family to raise funds for the disease. "A Cure for Kirby" and "Ben's Dream" are the nicknames for two other Sanfilippo foundations set up by families to raise money toward a cure over the years. Ben Siedman died earlier this year just shy of his 18th birthday. Kirby Wilson is in her early 20s, but wheelchair-bound and unable to speak.

The O'Neills had said they expected Eliza to lose her ability to speak by this birthday. She still talks, but she's sometimes slower to find the words, and the O'Neills have noticed she's not learning new things anymore.

There's no guarantee McCarty and Fu will get government approval to do their clinical trial or that Eliza will get in, but the family said they had to do something, Glenn O'Neill said. There's also no guarantee it will be a cure.

"If we don't get the trial funded, and we don't get it up and running," Glenn O'Neill said, "the guarantee is that she has no chance."

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Study Finds Daily Aspirin Use May Not Significantly Lower Risk of Heart Attack

Study Finds Daily Aspirin Use May Not Significantly Lower Risk of Heart Attack

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study led by Japanese researchers found that daily aspirin use may not be as beneficial to patients at risk of heart disease as previously believed.According to the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers looked at 14,000 people age 60 or older with hypertension, diabetes or high cholesterol. These patients were split into two groups, with one receiving 100 milligrams of coated aspirin daily. The other group received no daily aspirin. After five years of research, the study indicated that there was no significant benefit among those participants taking aspirin. Significant bleeding, a possible side-effect of aspirin use, was putting patients at risk, researchers say.

The study does not involve use of aspirin for its already approved indications, including use during a suspected heart attack and use to prevent a second heart attack. All aspirin users should consult with a healthcare provider before altering their regimen.

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Ebola-Stricken Surgeon Dr. Martin Salia Died Despite ZMapp, Plasma Transfusion

Ebola-Stricken Surgeon Dr. Martin Salia Died Despite ZMapp, Plasma Transfusion

Hemera/Thinkstock(OMAHA, Neb.) — Dr. Martin Salia, who contracted Ebola in Africa and was later flown to the United States, has died, officials with Nebraska Medical Center said.Salia is the third patient treated for the virus at the medical center."It is with an extremely heavy heart that we share this news," Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the Biocontainment Unit at Nebraska Medical Center and professor of infectious diseases at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, said in a statement.Salia, 44, was a permanent resident in the U.S. and married to a U.S. citizen. Salia was a native of Sierra Leone.Salia was suffering from advanced symptoms of Ebola when he arrived at the hospital Saturday, authorities said, including kidney and respiratory failure.In a statement, the White House said, "We extend our heartfelt condolences to the family and loved ones of Dr. Martin Salia, who succumbed this morning to Ebola at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, despite the heroic efforts of that institution’s incredibly talented team. Dr. Salia leaves behind loved ones in the United States, his adopted homeland, and in Sierra Leone, where he was born."A general surgeon, Dr. Salia dedicated his life to saving others. He viewed this vocation as his calling, telling his fellow United Methodist Church members that he pursued medicine not because he wanted to, but because he firmly believed it was God’s will for him. Dr. Salia’s passing is another reminder of the human toll of this disease and of the continued imperative to tackle this epidemic on the frontlines, where Dr. Salia was engaged in his calling," the statement added.

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A Romantic Kiss Is a Bacteria Nightmare, Say Researchers

A Romantic Kiss Is a Bacteria Nightmare, Say Researchers

Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Despite what the song “As Time Goes By” claims, a kiss is a lot more than just a kiss. 

Researchers in the Netherlands analyzed the oral bacterial profile of 26 couples before and after an intimate kiss and found that 80 million bacteria are transferred during the average 10-second smooch.The researchers also found that the saliva of couples have more similar bacteria than non-couples, and couples who kiss more frequently share the most oral bacteria.A side note: 75 percent of the men involved in the study reported higher kiss frequencies than their female partners, suggesting that guys over-report their sexual behaviors.The study was published in the journal Microbiome.

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Coffee May Decrease Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee May Decrease Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — An apple a day keeps the doctor away, and now new research shows a cup of coffee a day may help keep type 2 diabetes away.The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee says new research shows three to four cups of coffee each day lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent, compared to those who drank two cups or less.But wait, there's more. For every additional cup of joe consumed, a person earns another seven- to eight-percent reduced risk.Researchers still don't know why coffee lowers the risk, but it may be connected to antioxidants. The researchers note that our bodies appear to have a better glucose tolerance with high coffee consumption. And it has little connection to caffeine because decaf appears to have a greater protective effect than regular coffee.There are 29.1 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes and an estimated 8.1 million Americans undiagnosed.Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases and is linked with obesity and physical inactivity. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented through healthy food choices, physical activity, weight loss, and now possibly coffee.The study was published in Medical Daily.

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New Tool May Predict Your Risk of Heart Disease

New Tool May Predict Your Risk of Heart Disease

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — Most people would want to know if they have an increased risk of a heart attack, and now researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health have developed an online tool that may help individuals predict their risk as well as help them learn how lifestyle choices influence the danger.The researchers examined health data from approximately 100,000 people over 20 years to develop a risk model. They then developed a 5-minute online assessment tool called The Healthy Heart Score to illustrate how a person’s diet, exercise level, and habits play a role in heart disease risk.The tool asks users a series of questions about their lifestyle, such as “Do you smoke cigarettes?” and “During the past year, how often, on average, do you eat a serving of fruit?” Users receive a risk score of low, moderate, or high, along with tips for improvement.The score is based on nine critical diet and lifestyle factors that can impact a person’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the next 20 years.  The factors include smoking, weight, exercise, and intake of alcohol, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, sugary beverages, and red and processed meat.Medical observers note this is the first tool of its kind designed to help otherwise healthy individuals and their doctors determine long-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease.The study was published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Research Shows People Who Cook at Home Eat Healthier

Research Shows People Who Cook at Home Eat Healthier

Photodisc/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Nothing beats home cooking for taste, and now new research shows a home-cooked meal tends to be healthier than the food you find on menus.Researchers at Johns Hopkins examined national survey data from over 9,000 adults and found that individuals who eat more home-cooked meals during the week consume fewer carbohydrates, fats, and sugar than those who eat out more.The study also found that people who cooked more at home consumed fewer daily calories, ate fewer frozen meals and ate more fiber than those who ate more meals prepared outside of the home.Medical experts note that the results of the study were obtained via a survey, with participants asked to recall each item consumed during each meal. As a result, some of the data may be inaccurate due to poor recall or incorrect reporting.

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National Unfriend Day: Why It’s OK for Facebook Users to Slim Down Your Friends

National Unfriend Day: Why It’s OK for Facebook Users to Slim Down Your Friends

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — What started as a silly holiday by Jimmy Kimmel a few years ago has turned into an annual occurrence every Nov. 17, when participating Facebook users take a good hard look at their friends list and choose people to unfriend.If the idea of getting rid of that guy you went to camp with 14 years ago and never talk to or your over sharing aunt gives you pause, know that you have a social media etiquette expert's blessing."Just because you unfriend someone doesn't mean that it is a negative move," Diane Gottsman, an etiquette expert author and founder of The Protocol School of Texas, told ABC News. "Sometimes we just need to cull our list or redirect to them to another site or venue."With more than 1.3 billion users on Facebook, many users have had the experience of receiving a friend request from an old elementary school classmate or a college ex-boyfriend, making friends lists even more bloated."Relationships change," Gottsman said. "Not that you're being ugly but there just sometimes is not a reason to continue that relationship or let them have a window into the world.”When it comes to nixing relatives from your friends list, Gottsman said it's best to "use your judgement.""You have to weigh the annoyance. Is it going to be worse when you unfriend? Will it be more drama than its worth?If hiding their posts won't suffice and they're still annoying you -- it's OK to unfriend them, she said.When it's all done, you'll be left with a slimmed down friends list full of people with whom you actually care to stay connected."It’s like a bite," Gottsman said. "A little cat bite it will hurt for a second but they will get over it."

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Workplace Bathrooms Are Beehives of Activity

Workplace Bathrooms Are Beehives of Activity

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you thought your workplace bathroom was being used only for what it was designed for, you’d be wrong, according to a new survey by SCA, a Swedish global hygiene company.The company’s “Hygiene Matters” survey asked 13,000 people from 13 countries, including 1,058 people from the U.S., about their bathroom habits at work.Here are the results:

25 percent of Americans head to the stalls to text, while a slightly lower number, 23 percent, go to make a phone call. Five percent visit the bathroom to smoke, while another five percent go there with the intention of napping. Seven percent manage to exercise in the restroom. Eight percent admit they head to the restroom to eat. 10 percent of respondents visit the company restroom to cry. Broken down by gender, 14 percent of women and six percent of men admitted doing so. 23 percent of the women surveyed say they go to the workplace restroom to "deal with the frustration of everyday work life,” compared to 17 percent of men. 21 percent of guys use “the space to spend a moment alone or get space from colleagues," compared to 18 percent of the women. 10 percent of Americans only "sometimes" wash their hands after taking care of business. One percent says they never do. More than 40 percent of the U.S. respondents also say they don't clean their hands at all after getting to work. 87 percent of Americans expressed general satisfaction with workplace washrooms, with 13 percent claiming they'd rather use their employer's bathroom than the one they have at home. According to the survey, folks in China, Italy, and Russia are the least thrilled with their bathroom conditions at work.

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Complications from Premature Birth Number One Cause of Death in Young Children

Complications from Premature Birth Number One Cause of Death in Young Children

Photodisc/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the London School of Hygiene found that premature birth is the number one killer of babies worldwide.In a study published in the journal Lancet, 2013 marks the first years in which preterm birth is the top cause of death for young children. The overall number of early childhood deaths decreased from 2000 to 2013, reaching six million in 2013. One million of those died from complications from prematurity.Other notable causes of death among young children were pneumonia, diarrheal infections, malaria and complications during pregnancy.Researchers urged pregnant mothers to seek earlier medical care in an effort to prevent preterm birth.

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Study: Energy Drinks Dangerous for Young Children

Study: Energy Drinks Dangerous for Young Children

Mauro Matacchione/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A study presented at a meeting of the American Heart Association found that energy drinks may be extremely dangerous for young children.According to data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers, more than 40 percent of reports about energy drinks to U.S. poison control centers involved children younger than six years old. The brain and heart were most frequently affected organs.Steven Lipshultz, M.D., and chair of pediatrics at Wayne State University said that "energy drinks have no place in pediatric diets."The data showed 5,156 cases of energy drink exposure, 40 percent of which involved young children who were not expected to be drinking the drinks.

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Court Rules Canadian Girl Cannot Be Forced to Have Chemotherapy

Court Rules Canadian Girl Cannot Be Forced to Have Chemotherapy

VILevi/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(ONTARIO, Canada) -- A Canadian court has ruled that the family of a 11-year-old girl with cancer cannot be forced to treat her with chemotherapy.The girl is a member of the Six Nations tribe of American Indians and has been suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In September, the girl's mother stopped treatment after just 10 days and took the girl to a holistic healing center in Florida.McMaster Children's Hospital, which was treating the girl in Ontario, Canada, asked Brant Family Children's Services to intervene and bring the girl back from Florida for treatment.When BFCS refused, the hospital took the organization to court in an effort to force it to bring the girl back to Canada.McMaster Children's Hospital President Dr. Peter Fitzgerald said with chemotherapy the girl had a 90 percent to 95 percent chance for survival.Ontario Court Justice Gethin Edward ruled Friday that the girl could not be forced by BFCS to be treated with chemotherapy, the Toronto Star reported.Edward ruled Friday that the court could not intervene due to the family's aboriginal rights under the Canadian constitution.Andrew Koster, the family's attorney, said it was the family's right to choose their daughter's treatment."This wasn't a one-time blood transfusion such as in a Jehovah Witness situation," Koster said. "This was going to be two years of chemo. Does that mean we take this child away for two years and suppose she didn't make it?"Chiefs of tribal reserves neighboring the girl's applauded the decision."It reaffirms our right to be Indian and to practice our medicines in the traditional way," said Chief Bryan Laforme of the Mississaugas of New Credit, which is a neighboring reserve.After the ruling, Hamilton Health Sciences, the medical group that oversees McMaster Children's hospital, said in a statement they remained "committed to support this child's treatment with compassion and respect.""Our motivation has always been and remains that this child receives life-saving medical treatment in a timely manner," read a portion of the statement.

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