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CDC: Newly Identified Virus Linked to Kansas Man’s Death

CDC: Newly Identified Virus Linked to Kansas Man’s Death

Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that a new virus may have been responsible for the death of a Kansas man last year.In an article posted online ahead of print, the CDC says the patient was previously healthy and sought medical care in the late spring. He reported a history of tick bite, fever and fatigue, and though he was prescribed medication, his condition did not improve. Eleven days after the onset of illness, the CDC says the patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest.Initial tests done to identify tickborne pathogens were negative, but later tests showed the presence of another virus that the CDC believes is "a novel member of the genus Thogotovirus."Diseases in the Thogotovirus family are primarily associated with ticks. The CDC says there have been seven cases of human infection with viruses in the Thogotovirus category. The virus has been named the Bourbon virus, for the county in which the Kansas patient lived.

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Study: YouTube Videos Featuring Alcohol Consumption Don’t Tell the Whole Story

Study: YouTube Videos Featuring Alcohol Consumption Don’t Tell the Whole Story

Digital Vision/Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that YouTube videos related to alcohol intake are often shown to be funny, raising questions as to whether viral videos could be harmful.Researchers analyzed 70 of the most popular videos that depict consumption of alcohol. The videos totalled over 300 million views, according to the study, published in the journal Alcoholism. Of those videos, 89 percent showed men partaking in alcohol consumption, compared to just 49 percent showing women.The study noted that liquor was most commonly seen in the videos analyzed, followed by beer, with wine and champagne the leaast frequently depicted drinks. Further, 79 percent of videos included humor and 44 percent contained brand references. As a whole, the videos received far more "likes" than "dislikes" on YouTube. Researchers say that the videos, which are heavily viewed, infrequently depict the negative outcomes of drinking. The study does not, however, link viewership of these videos with any particular affect on actual alcohol consumption.

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Scope Manufacturer Comments on LA ‘Superbug’

Scope Manufacturer Comments on LA ‘Superbug’MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The company that manufactures the endoscopes that were implicated in the spread of a "superbug" at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center said Friday that it is "committed to developing solutions...that help im...

Does Crossing Your Legs Cause Varicose Veins?

Does Crossing Your Legs Cause Varicose Veins?

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- You may have heard at some point that crossing one’s legs causes varicose veins. But is that fact or fiction?

Dr. Debbie Yi, emergency medicine at UPenn Hospital, says fiction.“It’s never been shown that crossing your legs causes varicose veins,” states Yi.She goes on to explain that it’s been shown to have different causes for men and women: “What does cause varicose veins in men is smoking and low physical activity. In women, it’s lack of exercise, high blood pressure, and obesity.”Yi also mentions a study showing that women who stay on their feet all day and pregnant women show higher instances of varicose veins.So cross your legs with no worries -- there are other health factors to consider if you want to reduce your chances of getting varicose veins.

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Health Officials Release Lists of Potential Measles Exposure Sites

Health Officials Release Lists of Potential Measles Exposure Sites

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two outbreaks of the measles virus that have infected at least 141 people have led state and local health departments to release lists of the sites where residents might have been exposed to the virus in the hopes of curbing the outbreak.In California, the San Bernardino County Health Department's list reveals how staples of the community, such as grocery stores or a Walmart, could be sites of potential infections and not just hospitals or schools with low vaccination rates.Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said the range of potential infectious sites shows how important it is that every eligible person gets the measles vaccine.The virus "can be in a house of worship, it can be at a theme park. It can really be anywhere,” said Schaffner. “There doesn’t have to be close contact through the measles source and the susceptible person,” to get infected.In San Bernardino, where nine people measles cases have been reported, the health department list reflects a variety of places where people could have been exposed to the measles virus, from Walmart to Target to a local sushi restaurant and chocolate store.A Walmart spokesman told ABC News that company officials "take the safety of our customers and associates very seriously" and had instructed their associates, who were working when an infected person visited the store, to adhere to the health department's guidance.A Target spokesman told ABC News that the company has posted a notice in the store and were working with local health officials.The measles virus is among the most contagious viruses identified and can be transmitted four days before an infected person shows symptoms. By simply exhaling, an infected person can leave virus particles in the air that can infect anyone who does not have immunity.

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California ‘Superbug’ Victim’s Three-Month ICU Ordeal

California ‘Superbug’ Victim’s Three-Month ICU Ordeal

Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- An 18-year-old is among the seven California hospital patients to come down with a deadly drug-resistant "superbug," and he's spent most of the last three months in the intensive care unit, his lawyer told ABC News."His prognosis at this time is guarded but optimistic," said Pete Kaufman, an attorney for the teen's family.The teen already had an acute illness when he underwent an endoscopy procedure at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in December 2014, Kaufman said."Shortly after the procedure, he became gravely ill, and it was determined by the physicians at UCLA that he had contracted the CRE infection," Kaufman said.The teen was an inpatient at the hospital for more than two months and spent a "significant amount of that time" in the ICU, Kaufman said. He was released, but returned to the hospital for another endoscopy procedure in January, causing him to become re-infected with CRE. He is still an inpatient at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the lawyer said."It's the scope, the procedure that is now thought to have caused him to get the CRE infection," Kaufman said, adding that the teen's illness started with a fever and progressively got worse until he was "gravely, gravely ill."Seven people have become infected with the drug-resistant "superbug" known as CRE at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center after undergoing endoscopy procedures, and CRE may have played a role in two of its patients' deaths, hospital officials said Wednesday afternoon, adding that 179 people were exposed to the germ.The scopes were new and had only been in use since June, said Dr. Zachary Rubin, medical director of clinical epidemiology and infection prevention at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center."There are several manufacturers for these scopes," said Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, deputy chief of the acute communicable disease control program, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. "Because of the complexity of these scopes, which is necessary for the life-saving procedures for these scopes, they are very, very difficult to clean. The manufacturer recommendations were followed by UCLA."Kaufman, who has not yet filed any lawsuits on behalf of the victims, told ABC News that the focus of his case is the endoscope manufacturer, Olympus. An initial search did not reveal any existing legal cases against Olympus Corporation that are related to its endoscopes.

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Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

Thos Robinson/Getty Images for World Science Festival(NEW YORK) -- Renowned neurologist and author of Awakenings Oliver Sacks announced Thursday that he has terminal cancer.Sacks, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine, said in a New York Times article that cancer had been found in his liver nine years after he was first diagnosed with a rare ocular tumor.The doctor wrote that the initial treatment for the tumor in his eye left him partially blind and noted that most tumors of this kind do not metastasize."I am among the unlucky 2 percent," he wrote for the New York Times. "I feel grateful that I have been granted nine years of good health and productivity since the original diagnosis, but now I am face to face with dying."Sacks, 81, is best known for his writing on neurological case histories including "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" and an "An Anthropologist on Mars." His book Awakenings, based on his work in the 1960s with patients who were unable to initiate movement, was turned into an Oscar-nominated movie of the same name starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.Sacks, whose biography will be released this spring, wrote that he feels "intensely alive" after his diagnosis."Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts," he wrote. "This does not mean I am finished with life."While the famed doctor plans to give up following "politics or arguments about global warming," he said he feels the world is being left in good hands."I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude," he wrote. "Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure."Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Mental Health Services Needed for Many Homeless Children

Mental Health Services Needed for Many Homeless Children

iStock/Thinkstock(RALEIGH, N.C.) -- Of the 2.5 million children in the U.S. who are homeless each year, about one in four have issues severe enough to require the services of mental health professionals.So says Dr. Mary Haskett, a psychology professor at North Carolina State University, who headed a pilot study on the effects of homelessness on kids in Wake County.Joined by a team from Community Action Targeting Children who are Homeless (CATCH), Haskett explained these youngsters are at risk from mental health problems because of constant exposure to poverty and violence as well as lack of proper health care.After assessing the conditions of 328 homeless children in Wake County shelters, Haskett said that 25 percent of those between two months- and six-years-old required mental health services.  That figure is at least double the general population.Haskett and co-author Jenna Armstrong add that homeless children five- and six-years-old fared much worse in language and academic skills than kids from “normal” households.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Substance Abuse Rampant Among Pregnant Teens

Substance Abuse Rampant Among Pregnant Teens

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Teenage girls who become pregnant certainly have to grow up much faster than their non-pregnant peers.However, it turns out that a majority of them engage in destructive behavior than can harm their unborn child as well as themselves, according to researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and Saint Louis University's School of Social Work.Based on a large, nationally representative sample, almost six in ten pregnant teens admitted taking one or more substances during the past 12 months that included alcohol, marijuana and other drugs. That’s compared to 35 percent of girls who are not pregnant.The study also found that a third of pregnant girls age 12 to 14 years old said they used one or more of these substances within the last 30 days.However, alcohol and drug use dropped substantially across all ages groups as the girls went further into their pregnancies.Nevertheless, lead study author Christopher Salas-Wright at UT Austin's School of Social Work says that statistics show more work needs to be done. He added that levels of substance abuse among pregnant teens declined by 50 percent when the girls came from homes with strong adult support and supervision. Also, girls who kept attending school were also less inclined to use alcohol and drugs.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Lengthy Unemployment Shown to Change Personalities

Lengthy Unemployment Shown to Change Personalities

iStock/Thinkstock(STIRLING, Scotland) -- The longer unemployment lasts, the longer it can affect one’s personality, according to one study, which seems to disapprove the notion that people’s personalities are fixed.Researcher Christopher Boyce of the University of Stirling in Scotland says that over time, being out of work can make people less agreeable and as a result, may hamper their efforts to get hired.Based on a standard personality test given to 7,000 German adults, Boyce looked at the effects of unemployment on hundreds who were thrown out of work by examining the following personality traits: conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion and openness.  Interestingly enough, unemployed men’s levels of agreeableness increased in the first two years of being out of work but those levels dropped afterwards. Meanwhile, women’s agreeableness declined steadily from the point when they first lost their jobs.On the other hand, conscientiousness, which is tied to the enjoyment of income, fell among men throughout their unemployment but rose initially for women before declining.One way or the other, Boyce says prolonged unemployment has a detrimental effect on one’s personality and society should have more compassion for people who are unable to find a job due to changes that are often beyond their control.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Men Who Share Equally in Housework Don’t Like It Much

Men Who Share Equally in Housework Don’t Like It Much

Pixland/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- Who knew? Men who live in a country where the culture is more open to husbands and wives sharing housework seem to get more upset about their participation in this drudgery than in countries where women are expected to do all the housework.Researchers from Emory University and Umea University in Sweden surveyed 14,000 adults from 30 countries and discovered that women on average said they did about three-quarters of the housework while men handled just over 30 percent.Meanwhile, around 38 percent of men from the U.S., Australia, Denmark, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Latvia, Sweden and Poland, all considered gender egalitarian countries, said they shared about 50 percent of the chores at home.But here’s where it gets interesting. Men from these countries also complained about doing an unfair amount of housework as opposed to those from less egalitarian countries.Although it seems counter-intuitive, lead study author Sabino Kornrich says this resentment may stem from being aware that shared housework is just assumed in the country they live in.Meanwhile, men in Japan, where women are expected to do most if not all of the housework, don’t feel the same kind of resentment even if they actually get around to helping a little bit around the house.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Proposed Updates to Dietary Guidelines Include Limits on Caffeine and ‘Empty Calories’

Proposed Updates to Dietary Guidelines Include Limits on Caffeine and ‘Empty Calories’

hemeroskopion/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- An advisory panel made its recommendations to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services in regards to an update of dietary guidelines for Americans for 2015.In the 600-page report, the panel recommends setting daily limits for "empty calories," or the solid fats and added sugars that "provide calories but few or no nutrients." Those limits would vary by age and gender. Children between the ages of two and eight would be urged to keep their "empty calories" at about 120 calories per day; children nine to 13 years old would be advised to keep that figure between 120 and 250 calories per day. Girls and women above the age of 14 would have their guidelines for "empty calories" set at 120 to 250 daily, while boys and men of the same age would be advised to stay between 160 and 330 calories. The panel also recommends a daily limit of 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. Consumption of caffeine to that point "is not associated with adverse health consequences." The average cup of coffee contains about 95 milligrams of caffeine, allowing up to four cups daily for coffee drinkers.Finally, the panel placed more pressure on the food industry to promote healthy eating, urging the industry to encourage healthy eating by making low-fat or fat-free options default in restaurants, as well as fruit and non-fried vegetables in children's meals. Further recommendations included whole wheat buns in restaurants and reformulated food by manufacturers to lower intake of sodium, added sugars, saturated fat and calories, while increasing consumption of whole grains, fruits and vegetables.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell released a statement on the proposed guidelines, saying that they are "at the core of our efforts to promote the health and well-being of American families." The two departments will now review the report and begin the process of updating those guidelines.

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Scopes Faulted for Hospital ‘Superbug’ Outbreak Were New, Cleaned Properly, Officials Say, FDA Offers Recommendations

Scopes Faulted for Hospital ‘Superbug’ Outbreak Were New, Cleaned Properly, Officials Say, FDA Offers Recommendations

Photo by David McNew/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- A California hospital apologized Thursday to patients who became infected with an antibiotic-resistant bug, and said it has identified the source of the infections: two contaminated endoscopes that were cleaned according to manufacturer instructions but retained the bug anyway.Seven people have become infected with the drug-resistant "superbug" known as CRE at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center after undergoing endoscopy procedures, and CRE may have played a role in two of its patients' deaths, the hospital said Wednesday afternoon, adding that 179 people were exposed to the germ.The scopes were new and had only been in use since June, said Dr. Zachary Rubin, medical director of clinical epidemiology and infection prevention at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center."There are several manufacturers for these scopes," said Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, deputy chief of the acute communicable disease control program, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. "Because of the complexity of these scopes, which is necessary for the life-saving procedures for these scopes, they are very, very difficult to clean. The manufacturer recommendations were followed by UCLA."The first case occurred in mid-December when a patient became ill after undergoing endoscopy to examine his or her gallbladder, the hospital has learned."The patient developed almost immediately an infection afterwards with unusual bacteria that was resistant to strains of normally active antibiotics," Rubin said, explaining that it took time to trace the cases back to this original patient.The hospital has now taken all of its scopes out of use, and has implemented additional cleaning protocols beyond manufacturer recommendations. It has emailed and called all patients who underwent endoscopy from Oct. 23 through Jan. 28, officials said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday released a safety alert about duodenoscopes, the devices involved in the CRE outbreak in Los Angeles. The alert aims to "raise awareness among health care professionals...that the complex design of ERCP endoscopes may impede effective reprocessing." The administration defines reprocessing as "a detailed, multistep process to clean and disinfect or sterilize reusable devices."Even when done meticulously, however, the FDA is concerned that the process "may not entirely eliminate" the risk of transmitting infection.The FDA also offered recommendations for reprocessing, including urging healthcare professionals to follow manufacturer instructions, report problems to the manufacturer, and adhering to best practices including the implementation of a comprehensive quality control program.

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Alaska Claims Title of Happiest State in US

Alaska Claims Title of Happiest State in US

mfron/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Alaska, home to moose and the Palins, can finally claim that it is the happiest state in the U.S.Known as the Last Frontier, Alaska scored the No. 1 spot in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index for 2014, unseating North Dakota, which took the honor for 2013.  The annual ratings were released Thursday.Alaska had appeared thrice in the Top 10 since 2008, when the index started, but had never taken the top crown until now.Hawaii came in second — after falling to eighth place in 2013 — while West Virginia took No. 50 for the sixth straight year.States were measured on six subindexes, including individual life evaluation, emotional health, work environment, physical health, healthy behaviors and access to basic necessities.The data was based on more than 176,000 interviews conducted last year with adults across all 50 states.

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Same-Sex Couple Blames Discrimination After Pediatrician Allegedly Refuses to See Their Newborn

Same-Sex Couple Blames Discrimination After Pediatrician Allegedly Refuses to See Their Newborn

byryo/iStock/Thinkstock(OAK PARK, Mich.) -- A married same-sex couple in Michigan say they felt discriminated against after a pediatrician refused to see their newborn daughter, according to their attorney.Jami and Krista Contreras of Oak Park, Michigan, welcomed their daughter, Bay, four months ago. Six days after Bay was born, the couple took the infant to a pediatrician, Dr. Vesna Roi, they had chosen after an earlier prenatal visit with the doctor, the couple’s attorney, Dana Nessel, told ABC News.But after they arrived in the waiting room at Eastlake Pediatrics in Roseville, Michigan, Roi’s colleague came out to meet the family and told them that Roi had decided she couldn’t care for Bay, Nessel said.Eastlake Pediatrics didn’t immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.Nessel said the couple had met with Roi after a long search for a pediatrician who worked in holistic medicine.The couple immediately found a pediatrician elsewhere, but were still upset by their interaction. Nessel said they posted about their experience on Facebook and that they felt discriminated against because of their sexual orientation. The couple started to get responses from family and friends.The couple decided to take their story public recently to show discrimination among LGBTQ people that they say is still occurring, according to Nessel. She also said the couple wanted to draw attention to other potential instances of discrimination, including a pending state law called the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which could, in Nessel’s opinion, allow for people to discriminate based on their moral or religious beliefs.Calls to Roi’s office and home were not immediately returned.There are no laws in Michigan that protect lesbian, transgender, gay, bisexual or queer people from discrimination.After Contreras posted about Roi allegedly dropping them as patients, the pediatrician apparently sent the couple a letter apologizing for not meeting them in person, but not changing her position.The doctor wrote she “would not be able to develop the personal patient doctor relationship that I normally do with my patients,” according to a copy of the letter Nessel sent to ABC News on behalf of the couple.Roi also wrote that she didn’t talk to them in person because she felt her presence “would take away much of the excitement” for the new parents. She also wrote in the letter she did not have their number to call them before they arrived for their first appointment with Bay.Roi didn’t specifically write that she refused to treat Bay because of the couple’s sexual orientation, but both spouses and their lawyer said they believe Roi’s letter leaves no doubt about her motivation.She added in the letter, ”Please know that I believe that God gives us free choice and I would never judge anyone based on what they do with that free choice.”The couple has no plans to file a lawsuit or medical complaint, according to Nessel.Medical ethics experts say Roi’s actions may have been legal, but are ethically complicated.According to the American Medical Association, doctors should not "refuse care based on race, gender or sexual orientation," but they can refuse specific treatments if they are incompatible with "personal, religious or moral beliefs."Dr. Margaret Moon, associate professor of pediatrics and a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, said it’s acceptable that Roi felt she could not establish a patient-doctor relationship with the family, but said the doctor could have been upfront earlier.“The family experienced distress and a sense of discrimination. The family experienced a harm,” Moon said. “The pediatrician could have handled this much differently.”

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Race Against Time for Baby in Need of Heart, Lung Transplant

Race Against Time for Baby in Need of Heart, Lung Transplant

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Shortly after baby Olive Kang was born, doctors told her parents that because she had a rare heart defect, she would only survive two weeks -- maybe two months if she was lucky.She's been defying the odds for more than a year, but time is running out for her to get the heart-lung transplant she needs to survive, her mother, Robin Kang told ABC News."She's funky and feisty," Robin Kang said of her 16-month-old, who likes to wink and blow kisses when she's feeling good. "In the last two weeks, it seems like Olive is not -- she can't seem to hold her own without high-flow oxygen. They pretty much told us there was nothing they could do. We've heard that before, but we can physically see with our eyes that she's not able to support herself."Olive has was born with several heart and lung conditions, tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, and major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. All of these things combined render her heart and lungs unable to sufficiently provide oxygenated blood to the rest of her body. She's undergone several procedures, including cardiac catheterization to widen her pulmonary veins, but they're scarring and closing fast.Olive has been waiting for a new heart and new lungs for the last 10 months on the organ transplant waiting list.According to data from the Organ Transplant and Procurement Network, an organization under contract with the federal government to allocate organs, 21 people die each day waiting for an organ transplant that never comes, and a new person is added to the transplant waiting list every 10 minutes.Organ transplants for children so young are even more scarce. Last year, of the 27,036 heart/lung transplants performed, only 252 were in children under a year old and 462 were performed in children between 1 and 5 years old.Olive Kang's aunt, actress Moon Bloodgood, made a YouTube video to raise awareness about organ donation "so that beautiful children, like my niece, Olive, have a chance at a normal life.""Please, please consider organ donation for people of all ages," Bloodgood said into the camera. "It is truly the best thing that you can give."

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What to Know About the CRE ‘Superbug’ Infecting UCLA Patients

What to Know About the CRE ‘Superbug’ Infecting UCLA Patients

Huntstock/DisabilityImages/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- Seven patients at a California hospital have been infected with a drug-resistant "superbug" and 179 people were exposed to it, according to health officials. But with several so-called superbugs out there, the health scare can be confusing.Here's what you should know about Carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, the bug that's affecting patients at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center:

What is CRE?CRE is a family of germs normally found in the gut that have become resistant to a class of antibiotics that includes penicillin, amoxicillin and several other commonly used drugs that help fight harmful bacteria. These germs have an extra enzyme that breaks up antibiotics, making them difficult to treat, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

How serious is it?"It really depends on the patient, not the bug sometimes," said Dr. Frank Esper, an infectious diseases expert at UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland.If CRE is in a healthy gut, it won't necessarily cause an infection, Esper said. But if it gets into the blood, the bladder, or a wound on the skin, it can cause serious illness and death. And if someone has an underlying medical condition like cancer or pancreatitis, the patient is more likely to come down with a serious infection.About half of the people who develop CRE in a hospital will die, according to the CDC, but it's important to note that these patients are already very sick. As a result, it's hard to say whether CRE caused or played a role in their deaths.According to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, CRE may have played a role in two of its patients' deaths.

How is it spread?CRE is considered a hospital-acquired infection because it normally spreads on contaminated intravenous lines, catheters and other devices.At Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, a contaminated endoscope was to blame, the hospital said.An endoscope is a long tube with a camera on the end that's used to help doctors take a look at the inside of the digestive tract. And while endoscopy helps doctors catch diseases they would otherwise never be able to see, endoscopes are to blame in more hospital-acquired outbreaks than any other device because they're exposed to so many colonies of bacteria, Esper said.

How is it treated?Since CRE is resistant to most antibiotics, doctors are forced to use the antibiotics they stopped using 40 or 50 years ago, Esper said. The germs "forgot" how to be resistant to these older antibiotics, but doctors stopped using them because they were more toxic, he said."We don't have a lot of choices," he said. "There are not a lot of drugs coming out of the antibiotic pipeline."He said drug companies have stopped making new antibiotics because there isn't as much money in making something a patient doesn't have to take long term, but doctors have been begging for new antibiotics for decades.

Has a CRE outbreak ever happened before?Yes. According to the CDC, almost every state has had a confirmed case of CRE, but state health departments are not required to notify the CDC about CRE infections.Last month, a report revealed that a Seattle hospital had a CRE outbreak in which 23 patients were exposed between 2012 and 2014. Eleven people died, but it's hard to say whether the superbug played a role in their deaths. Similar incidents have occurred in Pittsburgh and Chicago.

How is CRE different from other superbugs?Most superbugs are drug-resistant bacteria.One that's probably familiar is MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is a bacteria normally found in the nose that can infect sick patients via contaminated intravenouses, for instance. But there are more treatments for MRSA because it isn't resistant to as many antibiotics as CRE.

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Kristen Bell Demands Friends Get Vaccinated Before Holding Her Baby

Kristen Bell Demands Friends Get Vaccinated Before Holding Her Baby

ABC/Rick Rowell(NEW YORK) -- Kristen Bell, an actress and mother of two under the age of 2, is not holding back about her pro-vaccine beliefs. The House of Lies star told The Hollywood Reporter she won’t allow her unvaccinated friends near her babies.“The whooping cough epidemic was on the rise and she wasn’t interested in taking any changes,” Chris Gardner, the reporter of The Hollywood Reporter story, told ABC News.Bell, 34, who gave birth to daughter Delta on Dec. 19, told the magazine that after the birth of their first daughter, Lincoln, in March 2013, “we simply said [to friends], 'You have to get a whooping cough vaccination if you are going to hold our baby.’”The actress added that she and her husband, actor and comedian Dax Shephard, plan to do the same thing with their newborn baby.“It's a very simple logic: I believe in trusting doctors, not know-it-alls,” she explained.The straight-talker took her frustration to Twitter, recently retweeting this pro-vaccine comment which says, “something 4 anti-vac parents 2 think about: if there were a peanut allergy vaccine created, would u give it 2 your kids?"The outspoken funny parents clearly see this topic as no laughing matter. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Could Germs Be Hiding in Store Makeup Testers?

Could Germs Be Hiding in Store Makeup Testers?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When it comes to makeup, there are 50 shades of everything. Should you buy firehouse red or petal pink? Which lipstick looks good is a distinction you can see, but with sample makeup testers, it’s what you can’t see that could make you sick.ABC's Good Morning America went undercover to six locations, from high-end department stores to discount retailers, swabbing testers from lipstick, mascara, foundation, and creams to see what germs and bacteria you could be rubbing on your skin.While none of the makeup looked particularly grubby, it was definitely used. I did see discoloration and noticed strange smells with some of the facial cream testers we swabbed.Makeup is notoriously hard to match to your skin tone -- you need to try on that bronzer or bright red lipstick to see if it looks good -- so I asked a salesperson how I could test a lip gloss color.The salesperson told me I could just try it on, and then she offered to help. She used a fresh, one-time use applicator but dipped it into the tester that was out on the floor. Then she admitted that many people just use the lipstick with the applicator that's built into the cap, meaning they apply it directly their lips and then put it back into the tube, the same tube another person may dip into to try five minutes later.The salespeople generally practiced good hygiene. One clearly stated “We don’t double dip,” which means they use a fresh applicator with every dip into the makeup, however another sent us home with face cream she dug out of the half empty tester that was out on the floor. Yuck!We sent all our swabs to Dr. Susan Whittier, Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Cell Biology at the microbiology lab at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. She pointed out that makeup testers all present perfect opportunities for bacteria to grow.Of the 25 samples she we sent her, nine tested positive for bacteria. It looks gross but it’s mostly bacteria we would find in everyday life. However, it could be harmful to some people who are immunocompromised.But three other results got Dr. Whittier’s attention.“We found that three samples were only growing yeast. That was worrisome,” she said. “If you are putting a product on your face that has yeast, that could definitely cause some sort of skin infection."Those infections include rashes and the dreaded pinkeye.These three results come from hand cream samples. Imagine that you rub it on in the store and then a few minutes later rub your eye. Yikes!Dr. Whittier’s advice: leave the testers alone.“I would never use a free sample in any kind of store whether it is high end or whether it is low end,” she said. “You just don’t know who’s had their finger in there.”So how are you supposed to figure out what shade of makeup is right?

Go to a sales associate. They have their own supplies and are usually trained in hygienic practices. Closed dispensers, such as pumps, are less likely to have germs. Don’t test at all. Some stores have a return policy for makeup that doesn’t work out. If you must try with a tester, ask a clerk to sterilize it with alcohol first. Don’t apply anything to your eyes or lips, where you are most vulnerable to infection.

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Is It Time to Do Away with Nap Time?

Is It Time to Do Away with Nap Time?

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(BRISBANE, Australia) -- As the joke goes, kids at nap time are often guilty of resisting a rest. But parents know that naps can be beneficial for youngsters while also giving adults a much-needed break.However, there seems to be some difference of opinion on whether daytime naps are really worthwhile, based on a study from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia.After analyzing 26 studies concerning the sleep habits of children from infancy through age five, lead study author Karen Thorpe and her team contend that naps for kids two and older might not be the best thing for them because daytime nappers tend to have a more difficult time falling asleep at night.Apparently, this has to do with something called homeostatic drive, a pressure that builds during waking hours. As a result, when there’s less homeostatic drive, the urge to sleep at night isn’t as great.Despite these findings, the Australian research team says naps still offer cognitive and physical benefits so they don’t recommend parents try to rouse tired kids who might need to grab a quick 40 winks.Essentially, since every kid is different, parents should decide if and when a child should nap.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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