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Tablet Use Can Lead to Neck Strain

Tablet Use Can Lead to Neck Strain

iStock/Thinkstock(PULLMAN, Wash.) — Using a tablet can be a literal pain in the neck.Researchers at Washington State University conducted a study of 33 students and staff members reading and typing on a tablet in a variety of positions that lasted two-to-five minutes.They discovered that the strain on the participants' neck muscles was three-to-five times greater than when people sat with their head in a neutral, straight-ahead position.Obviously, the higher the tablet was propped, the less strain was put on neck muscles.Lead author Anita Vasavada said the goal now is to develop "ergonomics guidelines for tablet computer use."It's estimated that over half of Americans ages 35-49 are regular tablet users while more than four in ten youngsters 17 and under own a tablet.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Overindulgence Is Not a Vice in Lafayette, Louisiana

Overindulgence Is Not a Vice in Lafayette, Louisiana

Monkey Business/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Ah, the sweet smell of excess.It's the aroma that wafts through the streets of Lafayette, Louisiana, deemed the number one metro area in the country for overindulgence by badcredit.org.The website, which bills itself as an authority on bad credit, used four metrics to determine America's 20 overindulgent cities: percentage of citizens considered “obese;” percentage of citizens considered “heavy drinkers;" percentage of citizens who smoke every day; and average debt per consumer.That's not to say that nobody does anything in these cities but have a good time, but there's a good chunk of the citizenry that appears not to have heard the expression "everything in moderation."In Lafayette, for instance, about 30 percent of the population is considered obese, 20 percent smoke daily and nine percent claim to be heavy drinkers. Here are the top 20 most overindulgent cities in the U.S.A.:

1. Lafayette, Louisiana2. Great Falls, Montana3. Mobile, Alabama4. Scranton, Pennsylvania5. Bismarck, North Dakota6. Baton Rouge, Louisiana7. Montgomery, Alabama8. Shreveport, Louisiana9. Salisbury, Maryland10. New Orleans, Louisiana11. Jacksonville, Florida12. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania13. Dayton, Ohio14. Sioux City, Iowa15. Rapid City, South Dakota16. Youngstown, Ohio17. Toledo, Ohio18. Charleston, South Carolina19. Little Rock, Arkansas20. Spokane, Washington

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Geckos Know How to Keep It Clean

Geckos Know How to Keep It Clean

iStock/Thinkstock(BRISBANE, Australia) — That little gecko mascot from a certain auto insurance commercial seems to stay spotless no matter what his company has him doing.In reality, James Cook University professor Lin Schwarzkopf says geckos are very clean creatures, even in the dusty desert plains of Australia.What's their secret to staying immaculate? Schwarzkopf explains that it has to do with tiny water droplets, such as from the early morning dew, coming into contact with miniscule hair-like spines covering gecko's bodies.The reaction is that the water droplets both roll over and pop off the skin of geckos, which keeps them clean as a whistle even in the driest of climates.As for practical applications, Schwarzkopf suggests the process could be used for clothing that would neither become wet nor dirty and therefore, might never have to see the inside of a washing machine.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kraft Recalls Mac & Cheese Over Possible Metal Fragments

Kraft Recalls Mac & Cheese Over Possible Metal Fragments

Photo illustration by Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) --  Kraft Foods Group said Tuesday it is voluntarily recalling 242,000 cases -- more than six million boxes -- of its Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner because some boxes may contain small pieces of metal."The recalled product is limited to the 7.25-oz. size of the Original flavor of boxed dinner with the 'Best When Used By' dates of September 18, 2015 through October 11, 2015, with the code 'C2' directly below the date on each individual box. The 'C2' refers to a specific production line on which the affected product was made," the company said in a statement.The recalled boxes were shipped to customers in the U.S. and several other countries. The affected dates of this product were sold in only these four configurations, the company said:• 7.25 oz. box, Original flavor • 3-pack box of those 7.25 oz. boxes, Original flavor • 4-pack shrink-wrap of those 7.25 oz. boxes, Original flavor • 5-pack shrink-wrap of those 7.25 oz. boxes, Original flavorKraft did not say if any injuries were reported. The boxes can be returned to stores for a refund or exchange.

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Trader Joe’s Recalling Raw California Walnut Products for Possible Salmonella Contamination

Trader Joe’s Recalling Raw California Walnut Products for Possible Salmonella Contamination

Michael Nagle/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Trader Joe's is recalling raw walnuts that may be contaminated with Salmonella, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday.The walnuts were distributed nationwide, the announcement notes. The nuts are Trader Joe's brand and include Raw California Walnut Pieces and Halves. The FDA has posted a list of the affected products on its website, including UPC codes, lot numbers and "Best By" dates. According to the FDA, the potential contamination was noted after normal testing done by an outside company revealed the presence of Salmonella in some packages of Trader Joe's walnuts. The company is removing all lots of the product from store shelves and will suspend sales of the products.The announcement notes that Trader Joe's has not received any complaints of illnesses related to the recalled products.

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Watch Yoga Acrobatics Performed on 600-Foot Cliff

Watch Yoga Acrobatics Performed on 600-Foot Cliff

Trimr(MOAB, Utah) -- A pair of yoga athletes took on a death-defying challenge of doing yoga acrobatics while on a 600-foot cliff in Moab, Utah.A three-minute video posted on YouTube by the Utah-based fitness company Trimr shows the yogis, Kesley Ondine and Brian Mosbaugh, performing sola and partner yoga moves, from bending over backwards to balancing on each other, often without the safety net of a harness.“That was the moment my heart was in my throat,” the video’s creator, Trimr executive Dallin Smith, told ABC News of the moment when Ondine and Mosbaugh told him the harnesses he planned to secure them in would get in the way and make it more dangerous.“They said, ‘Don’t worry about. We’re dialed in,’” Smith recalled. “They were locked in [mentally] the whole time. I was scared senseless.”Smith, 29, had the idea to shoot the video as a way to visualize Trimr’s focus on the “marriage between beauty and performance” in the company’s fitness products. The company brands itself as the place where, "designers and athletes work together."Trimr’s founders, Gary Moore and Travis Winn, gave Smith the go-ahead to stage the shoot, saying if he could pull it off it would “phenomenal.” Smith found the perfect partners in Ondine and Mosbaugh, athletes who specialize in mountain climbing and highlining, in addition to their obvious yoga skills.“Highlining requires an ability to completely drown out fear and drown out your surroundings,” Smith said. “That’s their training, to perform at that level while drowning everything out and conquering fear.”The yoga term for that state of consciousness, “Asamprajnata,” is what Smith titled the video. The shoot took place last November on two different peaks in Moab over the course of three days.“The highest peak was Witch Tower and we took an entire day before we shot just to climb and rig it,” Smith said. “On the shoot day it was about two hours for setup and we were there for probably about five hours.”With a depth of what Smith estimates to be about 5-feet by 9-feet, Witch Tower was so narrow that no camera crew could shoot there. The entire video -- two days’ worth of footage -- was shot by two drones.“We had one drone pilot on one end of the canyon and another on the other end of the canyon and we all communicated by radios,” Smith said.The video has 26,000 views and counting. Its most breathtaking moments are a credit to the steeliness of Ondine and Mosbaugh, according to Smith."A lot of people can do AcroYoga and a lot are very talented, but I think there is only a handful of people in the world who can do the yoga to those heights and those extremes with essentially death on the line if something was to go wrong," he said. "There was no room for error."

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MRI Could Determine How in Love You Truly Are

MRI Could Determine How in Love You Truly Are

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A China-based study has revealed that when you are in love, your brain looks decidedly different than when you’re not in love.“When you’re in love your brain looks happy,” Anna Zilverstand, Ph.D., a psychiatry postdoctoral fellow at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Icahn School of Medicine, told ABC News.Zilverstand was among a group of researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine, the University of Science and Technology of China and Southwest University in Chongqing, China, who led the study.The researchers recruited 100 college students from Southwest University and, after interviewing them, divided them into three categories: “in-love,” “ended-love” and “single.”MRI scanners were then used to detect what was going on in the students’ brains, according to the study’s research paper published last month in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.Students from the “in-love” category showed increased activity in multiple areas of the brain.“There is a tiny little region of the brain that’s called the reward center and it’s activated when we’re doing things that are very pleasurable,” Zilverstand said.

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How Paula Deen Lost 35 Pounds

How Paula Deen Lost 35 Pounds

Robin Marchant/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Paula Deen has never looked better, and is explaining how she dropped a whopping 35 pounds.The celebrity chef, 68, who was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes a few years back, was on the Dr. Oz show earlier this week and said, "I feel so good!"Deen admitted that when she first got her diagnosis, "I didn't believe the doctor."  After six months, she went in for another check-up and it was confirmed."At that point, I went home to my kitchen and I threw out everything that was white," she said. "White bread, white rice, white potatoes, white pasta. I did that for four months, y’all! Just four months and I lost 35 or 40 pounds.”Now, she's bringing all those elements back into her kitchen."The thing that I’m really trying to focus on, y'all, is moderation, moderation, moderation. Eat a cookie, just don’t eat six of them," she said.And if you eat too much, Deen said, "There's always tomorrow ... you can start over again."Starting over is what Deen is also doing professionally. She lost millions in endorsements last year after she admitted under oath, during a lawsuit filed by former employee Lisa Jackson, to using the n-word in the past. The two reached a settlement in the case.

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It’s Not Just Carbs that Make You Fat

It’s Not Just Carbs that Make You Fat

Moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Diet fads and food trends come and go. One decade’s nutritional zeitgeist might be about avoiding fat, the next about avoiding carbs. The Atkins diet, the paleo diet, the gluten-free lifestyle -- there’s a lot to consider.But how about carbs? Do they make you fat? Well, first off, there are two kinds of carbohydrates that our bodies process differently.“Simple carbohydrates are rapidly digested -- things like white bread, cookies and cakes," says nutritionist Dr. Jana Klauer. "...But the complex carbohydrates are things like fruit, vegetables and whole grains.”Complex carbohydrates can be a healthier choice. But regardless of the type, it’s not just carbs that will pack on the pounds.Essentially, it’s the amount of calories you are taking in, from any source. Whether it’s carbohydrates, proteins or fat, if you’re ingesting too many calories, you can gain weight.As Klauer notes, “It’s not carbohydrates that will make you fat, it’s eating too much.”

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The Truth About Epsom Salt

The Truth About Epsom Salt

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When it comes to health trends, it's hard to keep up. Everything from the Paleo diet to oil-pulling to drinking aloe vera water and bone broth compete to grab our attention.As part of the new “Yahoo Your Day” series -- a collaboration between ABC's Good Morning America and experts from Yahoo -- Michele Promaulayko, editor-in-chief of Yahoo Health, will do the research to tell you whether a trend is legitimate, or one you can quit.On Tuesday, Promaulayko looked into Epsom salt and whether it can really help your aching muscles.“It’s not a new trend but it seems to have grown in popularity. The CrossFit community talks about it a lot, a lot of wellness experts, there’s tons of proponents out there proselytizing it,” she said.Epsom salt -- or magnesium sulfate -- is supposed to help ease sore muscles after a workout and is often used in a bath. The idea is that soaking in the magnesium sulfate bath helps muscles recover.Others believe using Epsom salt will also absorb the magnesium into their bodies, which they claim relieves stress, cures depression, or helps you get a good night’s sleep.The science shows there has been only one small clinical study linking Epsom salt bathing to raising magnesium levels, according to Promaulayko. Other studies found Epsom salt baths helped people simply as a placebo effect.“Here’s the thing, our skin is a protective barrier. It doesn’t just keep the bad things out and let the good things in," Promaulayko said.So are the health benefits of Epsom salt legit? Or should you quit it?"It’s a quit, unfortunately," says Promaulayko. "But that said, sometimes things work because there’s a placebo effect in this case there just aren’t enough clinical studies to support it. But if it feels good, why not? It’s not going to hurt you."

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Hanging Out with Mom Is Cool Again

Hanging Out with Mom Is Cool Again

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Moms and their adult daughters are getting along better than ever -- at least in the United Kingdom.A survey by the market research company Usurv of 1,000 people suggests that many women are happy to bring their mothers to social events and connect with them on social media.For instance, 80 percent of daughters have dined with their moms at restaurants while two-thirds have gone shopping or taken vacations together. Fewer have brought their mothers to concerts or gone clubbing.Only 13 percent have not shared in any of those activities with their mothers.Meanwhile, 40 percent of respondents said they are connected with their moms on Facebook.Dr. Terri Apter, a psychologist at Newnham College, Cambridge explains, "Mothers today feel they have much more in common with their daughters than they had with their mothers." In fact, Apter says today's moms don't look all that much different from their daughters.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Urban Moms Find Support, Watch Out for Each Other’s Kids in Local Facebook Groups

Urban Moms Find Support, Watch Out for Each Other’s Kids in Local Facebook Groups

Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It was about 9:30 on a recent evening when Stacey Wanicur was reading through her Facebook feed. A post from a woman she’d never met made her stop in her tracks. “I hope the person that hired my previous nanny is reading this,” it started. It went on to detail how the nanny, a woman we’ll call Mariah, had left the poster’s three-year-old in a bathtub unattended and fallen asleep at the playground while the child ran around. The post asked that if the woman who had hired Mariah was also in the UES Mommas Facebook group, an active group of 6,000-plus moms who primarily live on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, that she get in touch with the poster. Wanicur had just hired a nanny named Mariah. “But I thought, it couldn’t be.” It was. Wanicur and the poster had a phone call that same night, and identified the woman, Mariah, through some details. Wanicur came to realize that the nanny, Mariah, had been spotted on the playground sleeping by a third woman, a friend of the poster. That same friend then spotted Mariah with Wanicur’s baby, realized the nanny had been hired by another family, and encouraged the poster to reach out on UES Mommas. Even big-city moms need a village. But in today’s digital age, that village is Facebook. For Wanicur, mom to a one-year-old who's an attorney and freelance writer, finding a nanny has been a challenge. She’s on the verge of hiring number 11. Some, she said, have been “great” but didn’t work out for logistical reasons. Others wanted more hours per week than even a corporate lawyer could give. One lacked experience. But Mariah seemed great. “I watched her on the nanny cam, she would sing to my daughter. The baby seems to like her. She cleaned up, was going to get the whole family eating healthier.” And Wanicur had checked Mariah’s references. But her previous employer – the poster – had been left off that call list. It’s not the only story about moms having each other backs. And despite the so-called “mommy wars,” there’s very little stay-at-home mom vs. working mom back and forth. It was primarily stay-at-home moms who took the time to track down the mom of a toddler boy who had been witnessed running into traffic outside a playground while his nanny chatted on the phone, oblivious. (The boy was stopped by a mother who did not know him but watched him until the nanny appeared). The mother of the boy was not part of the Facebook group, but moms that were put together various “clues” over the next few days when they spotted the nanny and the boy out in the neighborhood. Eventually, the moms figured out where the little boy lived, and left a note with the doorman for the boy’s mom so she would know what had happened. And while these examples are more dramatic and serious than the typical day-to-day chatter, Wanicur called the board “the number-one influential resource for me” since becoming a new mom. “Having a baby can be isolating, but this has been unbelievable helpful. You can be up at 4 am with a fussy baby, maybe teething and post a photo and all of a sudden have 45 other moms’ opinions and advice.” Mommy Facebook groups exist in cities all over the nation. There’s Boston moms, Los Angeles moms, Long Island moms, Glen Rock, NJ, moms. And while the popularity of the Facebook moms’ groups is “relatively new,” said Rebecca Michals, BabyCenter.com’s community manager, turning to other moms online for support isn’t. BabyCenter’s been doing it for years. “Instead of 3-5 local women you have thousands to offer support,” she said. “It does take the place of the village, or your mom or aunt down the street.” And as with any village, some voices are louder than others. But by and large, the atmosphere – both on Facebook and on message boards like BabyCenter’s – is supportive. Much like the women in that idyllic “village” that, for the most part, is a thing of the past in America. “Moms respect each other when they know they are doing the best for their families,” said Michals.

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Routine Heart Tests May Be Useless for Many

Routine Heart Tests May Be Useless for Many

Monkey Business Images/Monkey Business/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In a strongly worded statement released on Monday, the American College of Physicians says that common tests like EKGs and radioactive imaging of the heart are largely unnecessary if performed on patients who have no symptoms of heart problems or other significant health issues.The group's concern, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is not just that these tests are a waste.There is also the “false positive” problem, according to researchers, which are issues discovered that pose no medical danger, but lead to more unneeded and expensive tests and procedures. Researchers say that if the patient has no heart symptoms, doctors should instead focus on addressing smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity – all of which might pose actual heart danger in the future.

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Routine Heart Tests May Be Useless for Many

Routine Heart Tests May Be Useless for Many

Monkey Business Images/Monkey Business/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In a strongly worded statement released on Monday, the American College of Physicians says that common tests like EKGs and radioactive imaging of the heart are largely unnecessary if performed on patients who have no symptoms of heart problems or other significant health issues.The group's concern, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is not just that these tests are a waste.There is also the “false positive” problem, according to researchers, which are issues discovered that pose no medical danger, but lead to more unneeded and expensive tests and procedures. Researchers say that if the patient has no heart symptoms, doctors should instead focus on addressing smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity – all of which might pose actual heart danger in the future.

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Social Media Campaign Reunites Man With Childhood Nurse

Social Media Campaign Reunites Man With Childhood Nurse

Gary Bentley/Alabama Turtle Farmer (KILLEN, Ala.) -- Gary Bentley had open heart surgery when he was only 10 years old. But it's not the pain or even the fear he recalls from that hospital stay in 1973. "There was a nurse when I came out of intensive care," said Bentley, of Killen, Alabama. "She was on my floor right after I recovered and she was very sweet to me.”"She brought me little gifts. I don't really remember what they were, but the one thing she brought was a smile and encouraging words every day. She also played little games with me. I got so attached." Hospital staff had transferred Bentley from the ICU to another unit. The now 52-year-old told ABC News he was sad to leave the nurse who originally cared for him post-surgery. "I tried to go back down to see her, but being a kid, they wouldn't let me," he said. "We took a photo and I carried that picture through three foster homes. It even made it through a house fire." Forty-two years after his hospital stay, Bentley's wife suggested he share the photo on Facebook in an effort to locate the nurse. "I said, 'What's the chances of finding her?,' it's been 42 years," he said. "My wife posted it on her page and asked family and friends to share the photos. I was worried that she might not want to be found." Almost 7,000 shares later, a local news site picked up Bentley's story. Just two days later, the search for nurse Kathy was over. "Her daughter emailed us Thursday night and Friday morning we finally made contact," said Bentley. "We met yesterday at a park. She's still the same sweet nurse Kathy I remember from years ago." "We talked about her family and my family," he said of Kathy, who's still nursing today. "Of course we talked about 42 years ago, we can't believe it went so fast. Looking at the picture brought tears to both of our eyes. She said she was going to keep it on her desk where she would see it every day. She also said that my family and I made her feel like a princess." While he said he hasn't had a scare, Bentley continues to see his doctor annually for heart checkups. In addition, he said that he will forever cherish the moment that he and nurse Kathy reunited. "She went beyond her job. My dad was a non-functioning alcoholic and when mom left, the state stepped in and took over and me and my siblings away. Nurse Kathy didn't know about my situation or my home life. She could just tell there was a little boy who needed a smile." Today, Bentley owns his own business breeding turtles in Alabama. He's been married for 34 years and has two children and three grandchildren.

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Social Media Campaign Reunites Man With Childhood Nurse

Social Media Campaign Reunites Man With Childhood Nurse

Gary Bentley/Alabama Turtle Farmer (KILLEN, Ala.) -- Gary Bentley had open heart surgery when he was only 10 years old. But it's not the pain or even the fear he recalls from that hospital stay in 1973. "There was a nurse when I came out of intensive care," said Bentley, of Killen, Alabama. "She was on my floor right after I recovered and she was very sweet to me.”"She brought me little gifts. I don't really remember what they were, but the one thing she brought was a smile and encouraging words every day. She also played little games with me. I got so attached." Hospital staff had transferred Bentley from the ICU to another unit. The now 52-year-old told ABC News he was sad to leave the nurse who originally cared for him post-surgery. "I tried to go back down to see her, but being a kid, they wouldn't let me," he said. "We took a photo and I carried that picture through three foster homes. It even made it through a house fire." Forty-two years after his hospital stay, Bentley's wife suggested he share the photo on Facebook in an effort to locate the nurse. "I said, 'What's the chances of finding her?,' it's been 42 years," he said. "My wife posted it on her page and asked family and friends to share the photos. I was worried that she might not want to be found." Almost 7,000 shares later, a local news site picked up Bentley's story. Just two days later, the search for nurse Kathy was over. "Her daughter emailed us Thursday night and Friday morning we finally made contact," said Bentley. "We met yesterday at a park. She's still the same sweet nurse Kathy I remember from years ago." "We talked about her family and my family," he said of Kathy, who's still nursing today. "Of course we talked about 42 years ago, we can't believe it went so fast. Looking at the picture brought tears to both of our eyes. She said she was going to keep it on her desk where she would see it every day. She also said that my family and I made her feel like a princess." While he said he hasn't had a scare, Bentley continues to see his doctor annually for heart checkups. In addition, he said that he will forever cherish the moment that he and nurse Kathy reunited. "She went beyond her job. My dad was a non-functioning alcoholic and when mom left, the state stepped in and took over and me and my siblings away. Nurse Kathy didn't know about my situation or my home life. She could just tell there was a little boy who needed a smile." Today, Bentley owns his own business breeding turtles in Alabama. He's been married for 34 years and has two children and three grandchildren.

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Melaleuca unveils global headquarters

Melaleuca unveils global headquartersIDAHO FALLS — Melaleuca CEO Frank VanderSloot unveiled his company’s new global headquarters to members of the Greater Idaho Falls Chamber of Commerce and the media on Monday. The 350,000 square-foot complex, located south of Idaho Falls, consolidates the majority of Melaleuca’s regional holdings into a single a 195-acre campus. The building, VanderSloot said, is […]

Top NFL Rookie Retiring Over Head Trauma Concerns

Top NFL Rookie Retiring Over Head Trauma Concerns

Photo by Michael Zagaris/San Francisco 49ers/Getty Images(BERKELEY, Calif.) -- One of the NFL’s top rookies last season announced on Monday he plans to retire because of concerns over the long-term effects of repetitive head trauma.San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland told ESPN’s Outside the Lines on Monday he notified the team of his decision on Friday.The 24-year-old told ESPN he made his decision after consulting with family members, concussion researchers, friends and current and former teammates, and studying what is known about the relationship between football and neurodegenerative disease."I just honestly want to do what's best for my health," Borland told Outside the Lines. "From what I've researched and what I've experienced, I don't think it's worth the risk."Borland now becomes the most prominent NFL player to leave the game in his prime over concerns about brain injuries.

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Police Departments 700 Miles Apart Help Rescue New York Woman

Police Departments 700 Miles Apart Help Rescue New York Woman

Gewoldi/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A quick-thinking graduate student and two police departments separated by over 700 miles came together to help save a woman suffering a medical emergency. Ji-Hoon Seo, a student at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana, was on Skype with his long-distance fiancée, a student at Pratt Institute in New York, when she suddenly passed out on the floor Tuesday. "I called her name I think more than 10 times. She didn't reply," Seo, 24, told ABC News. "I didn't know what to do." A worried Seo dialed 911 but was connected to the Lafayette Police Department. "I thought 911 is connected through all the States, but it's not," Seo said. "I told them, 'My fiancée is passed out, please help her.' But they said, 'We have to connect to the New York department.'" Seo stayed on the line as dispatchers in Indiana relayed information to the New York police and fire departments, according to Lafayette police, and the video chat was used to help find the right apartment. New York officers forced their way into the apartment, where they found Seo's fiancée unresponsive but breathing, according to Lafayette police. She was taken to a hospital. Seo said he remained on Skype during the entire ordeal. Seo, who flew to New York on Friday to be by his fiancée's side, said they're still not sure what caused her to pass out. He declined to give ABC News her name. "She's at home," Seo said. "Now I think she's okay."

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American Health Worker Diagnosed with Ebola in Critical Condition

American Health Worker Diagnosed with Ebola in Critical Condition

ABC News(BETHESDA, Md.) -- An American who contracted Ebola while working in West Africa is now in critical condition at the National Institutes of Health near Washington, D.C., authorities said on Monday. The patient’s status was changed from serious to critical, according to a statement made by the agency earlier on Monday. The patient was flown in isolation from Sierra Leone on a chartered plane last week back to the states, authorities said. The patient’s name has not been released but the patient is known to have been a person working with Partners in Health, a Boston nonprofit group. An additional 12 individuals transported from West Africa are being monitored for the Ebola virus, officials said. Three of the other returned health care workers are also near the NIH clinical center in Bethesda, Maryland, according to a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Four of the returned workers are in Atlanta near Emory University Hospital and another five arrived at the Nebraska Medical Center in Oklahoma. The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the deadliest in history. Though it has slowed down since its peak last year, there have been nearly 25,000 confirmed cases and more than 10,000 deaths, according to the latest numbers from the CDC.

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