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‘Magic Mirrors’ Boost Self-Confidence of Unsuspecting Shoppers

‘Magic Mirrors’ Boost Self-Confidence of Unsuspecting Shoppers

IKEA UK(NEW YORK) -- “Mirror, mirror on the wall…who’s the fairest of them all,” is no longer just for fairy tales.“Magic mirrors,” of sorts, are now popping up as an experiment designed to boost people’s self-confidence, telling them how they should really feel about the image staring back at them.IKEA, the popular Swedish furniture store, recently unveiled their new “Motivational Mirror” in Britain last week, created for the purpose of delivering uplifting, confidence-boosting comments to those gazing into their own reflection.Comments like, “You look amazing today,” “that’s a magnificent beard,” and “Wow, have you been working out?” greeted shoppers as they approached the real-life “magic mirror.”“With well over two-thirds of Britons claiming image insecurity and self-doubt, IKEA have today announced the launch of the ‘Motivational Mirror’ -- bestowing personalized compliments to provide the nation with a much needed morale boost,” IKEA’s description on their YouTube video showing off their new device, which has already garnered nearly 115,000 views since Oct. 2, read.It’s a page out of the Dove playbook, which released an ad last year aimed at changing the way women see their own beauty as an FBI-trained forensic sketch artist first draws a woman as she describes herself, then draws her as a total stranger describes her. The difference in results couldn’t have been more dramatic.Now, an all-female Texas rock band called The Mrs. with their hit song, “Enough,” is trying the experiment in real life with their #imEnough campaign.“Women go around beating themselves up for every little thing, and it’s time we stop,” Andra Liemandt, the band’s founder and drummer, told ABC News.They set up a talking mirror at a local mall which then comes to life as shoppers stand before it.“Don’t be afraid of the reflection you see,” the mirror says as it talks to the women. “You are an amazing woman, and today I want you to look in this mirror and not just feel ‘ok.’”When asked what the phrase “I’m enough” means to Liemandt, she replied, “It means ‘I’m enough for my family and for my friends.’”And judging by their social experiment, which has gone viral with more than three million views on YouTube, their “magic mirror” is successfully convincing women everywhere that they are, indeed, enough.

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Psychologically Abused Children Also Suffer Major Trauma

Psychologically Abused Children Also Suffer Major Trauma

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Hearing about children who’ve been physically or sexually abused makes just about everyone’s blood boil. However, people may be less inclined to worry as much about youngsters who’ve suffered at the hands of parents who may have bullied, threatened, isolated or insulted them.Yet, underestimating the damage caused by psychological abuse is a serious problem, according to the American Psychological Association, which concludes that it’s as bad or even worse at times as physical or sexual abuse.By studying more their 5,600 mental histories of children, the APA found that “among the three types of abuse, psychological maltreatment was most strongly associated with depression, general anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, attachment problems and substance abuse.”What makes it particularly dangerous is that there are often no obvious signs of damage, unlike physical battering, which can leave conspicuous marks.

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Americans Know More About Twinkies than Smoke Alarms

Americans Know More About Twinkies than Smoke Alarms

Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- This being Fire Prevention Week, it's probably smart to check on whether the smoke alarms in your home need replacing.Unfortunately, a survey conducted for Kidde Fire Safety suggests that Americans still have a lot to learn about the longevity of smoke alarms.For instance, just nine percent of respondents knew that these potential lifesavers have an operating life of ten years.  In contrast, more than four in ten were aware that the shelf life of a Hostess Twinkie is 45 days.Another distressing finding: about half of Americans spend 15 minutes or less to shop for smoke alarms.Since fire deaths went up 16 percent in 2013, Kidde Fire Safety says it's important that people take the matter more seriously. When fatalities from fires occur, 60 percent of the time they happen in homes with non-working smoke alarms.

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Huh, What? Pot Doesn’t Enhance Creativity, Say Researchers

Huh, What? Pot Doesn’t Enhance Creativity, Say Researchers

iStock/Thinkstock(LEIDEN, Netherlands) -- In addition to the pleasurable feeling attained from smoking marijuana, some users who possess artistic talents are convinced the drug enhances their creativity.Lorenza Colzato and Mikael Kowal, psychologists at Leiden University in Holland, say they hate to burst anyone’s bubble but they believe that pot’s psychoactive ingredient THC is more of a creative inhibitor than anything else.The researchers conducted experiments whereby participants did thinking tasks after smoking marijuana with a high THC content while others used the drug with low THC or took a placebo.As it turned out, those who were very stoned performed far worse than the others on tests requiring them to come up with as many solutions to a problem as possible.Colzato and Kowal believe the notion that creativity is improved after smoking a lot of pot is just an illusion.

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Detergent Pods Can Also Harm Little Eyes

Detergent Pods Can Also Harm Little Eyes

ABC News(CINCINNATI) -- In recent years, parents have been warned that their children can be poisoned by colorful liquid detergent pods that are easily mistaken for candy. Now, health officials are issuing another advisory resulting from kids suffering injuries to the eyes due to liquid that squirts out after a pod is squeezed or bit into.Dr. Michael Gray from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical says that the injuries he’s seen include conjunctivitis and corneal damage. However, there’s an upside to the story in that there’s been no long-range problems, with children getting their eyesight back to normal within a week.Just the same, Gray cautions that these detergent pods should be treated like any other toxic chemical in that they should be put in places that little hands can’t reach.Even with all the warnings, hospitals and poison control centers have been kept busy because of youngsters accidentally ingesting liquid detergents. In 2012, close to 6,300 injuries were reported.

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Former Ballerina Teaches Down Syndrome Students to Dance

Former Ballerina Teaches Down Syndrome Students to Dance

iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA MONICA, Calif.) -- About 30 students get ready for dance class every Sunday at the Westside School of Ballet in Santa Monica, California. But, technically, the studio isn’t open for its usual classes. Instead the doors are open for the students of the Free 2 Be Me dance troupe.Started by Colleen Perry, the program allows children (and a few adults) with Down syndrome to try out dancing. Some students are talkative and others don’t say a word. For those who are not willing to move on their own, dance volunteers will help them through the moves.Perry, 49, started the program after reading an article about a choreographer who created a program allowing children with Down syndrome to work with a Boston ballet troupe. Perry instantly knew what she wanted to do.“A voice said, ‘Colleen this is what you’re supposed to be doing with your life,’” she recalled.Perry spent her childhood and early adult years in ballet, but had spent more than two decades as a family therapist. She had been looking for a way to get back into dance when she read the article.Without any experience in teaching, Perry started preparing a dance class aimed mainly at children with Down syndrome, within six months she had space in a dance studio and a curriculum.Rather than the rigorous perfectionism Perry chased when she danced in a ballet company, she now focuses on having fun with the kids and getting them to simply express themselves through their dancing.Perry said many of the children are nonverbal and that movement and dance can be an alternate way they can show emotion and personality.“Any kind of embodied movement is a beautiful way for people to express themselves,” Perry said.Children who are nonverbal can be more vulnerable for certain mental health problems including anxiety, hyperactivity and social isolation, according to the National Down Syndrome Society.Perry said she hopes the class can help nonverbal children be more social and expressive of their emotions. She said it can take months before a nonverbal child feels ready to step away from the sidelines and join in with the others.“The child, who wants to sit in front of the mirror for three sessions, then she just leaps up and begins to dance like no bodies business,” she said. “Then we’re all crying.”Perry and her Free 2 Be Me Dance Troupe are now the subject of a short documentary by Jeanette Godoy. Godoy followed the dancers for six months as they prepared for their big dance recital.Godoy found out about the unique dancers when she went to see her daughter at a local ballet recital.“I absolutely fell in love,” Godoy said. “When I saw them perform and saw the joy they felt out there on the audience on stage, I could absolutely relate to that joy.”Godoy said she would get particularly moved at the end of class when students had a chance to perform their own solo. Some children moved across the whole floor and others weren’t ready to be the center of attention.But Godoy said there was one girl who really epitomized the whole class. Named Daisy, Goody said, the 14-year-old didn’t talk much and relied on a volunteer to help her through movements. During one solo session, Daisy finally decided to take the floor.“Little Daisy shuffled to the center of the room, her movement was a little bit of a fist pump,” Godoy said. You “saw a little smile creep across her face.”“It was the first time I had seen her move on her own in all my weeks of shooting,” Godoy said.The short documentary, also titled Free 2 Be Me, is available online.

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Young Breast Cancer Patients Grapple with Fertility

Young Breast Cancer Patients Grapple with Fertility

Wavebreak Media/Thinksock(NEW YORK) -- It was just a few days before Christmas last year when Crystal Miller received the phone call that changed her life: Even though she was only 27 years old and had no risk factors, she had breast cancer.Miller, an oncology nurse at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, said she started crying even before she hung up the phone."What did I do with my life?" she remembered asking herself. "I should have been having more fun. I should have had a family by now."Still, she was stunned when, a few weeks later, her oncologist suggested that she speak to a fertility specialist. Amid fighting for her life, saving her future hypothetical children never crossed her mind.However, female chemotherapy patients often face immediate decisions concerning their future ability to get pregnant.Miller learned that chemotherapy would age her ovaries by 10 years and that, even after treatment, pregnancy would be a challenge because she’d be on a drug called Tamoxifen, which she’d have to stop taking if she wanted to get pregnant. She could freeze her eggs now and implant them later to have a better chance at a healthy baby, but it wasn’t a sure thing, she said.“I walked out of his office and I just started crying,” she said. “Hearing ovaries can age by 10 years. I’m 27 now. That’s 37.”Nevertheless, Miller feared that undergoing fertility treatments could delay her chemotherapy. And because she didn’t know yet what stage her cancer was, she decided she couldn’t wait.She opted not to go through the process of freezing her eggs, saying she just wanted the cancer out of her body, even if it meant that children might not be in her future.“I just wanted it out of me,” she said. “That was my emotional reaction. ...I didn’t want to have to do this again.”She said she didn’t know whether she would have made the same decision if she was in a relationship. And now, even though she’s not dating anyone, she said she worries about what a new boyfriend might think of the fact that she might not be able to have children.“I thought I was making a decision for my future husband,” she said.Regardless of those fears, she said it was the best decision for her at the time and she doesn’t regret it.Dr. Alan Copperman, who directs the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, said while altering the patient’s cancer prognosis by delaying treatment for fertility-saving measures is at the forefront of his mind, it’s often not a problem. Chemo is often not delayed more than a few days, and he’s had women come back after treatment and have healthy babies.“It is unbelievably rewarding to hear the heartbeat, to share that joyous event with the patient and send them off to obstetrics,” Copperman said.Though specialists like Copperman have been able to freeze eggs for decades, he said the procedure has become more popular, in general, over the last seven or eight years.The biggest obstacle is making sure cancer patients know about their fertility options, said Dr. James Goldfarb, who directs the fertility program at UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland. Oncologists are sending patients to fertility specialists more and more, but some young patients don’t learn about their options until it is too late.“We still see patients who come to us after having chemo and are now in menopause, and [we] wonder if we can do anything for them at that point,” he said.Still, freezing one's eggs is not for everyone, Copperman said.“They should, at least, not look back and say ‘Wow, I wish I knew about it,’” he said.

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Researchers Hope Stem Cells Lead the Way to Diabetes Cure

Researchers Hope Stem Cells Lead the Way to Diabetes Cure

shironosov/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study conducted at Harvard University may be a step towards curing type-1 diabetes using human stem cells, researchers say.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that 13,000 young people are diagnosed with type-1 diabetes annually. Researchers say they took human embryonic stem cells grown in a dish and turned them into cells incredibly similar to the natural insulin-producing cells in human bodies. Those cells, once grown, were then transplanted into mice, according to the study, which was published in the journal Cell.Once transplanted, researchers say they functioned in much the same way that the same cells would when transplanted from human cadavers -- a previously known treatment that is potentially curative. While the study is far from being used in humans, it could lay the groundwork for future treatment of diabetes using human stem cells grown outside the body.

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Liberian Community in Texas Raises Concerns About Dallas Ebola Patient’s Treatment

Liberian Community in Texas Raises Concerns About Dallas Ebola Patient’s Treatment

Will Montgomery(DALLAS) -- The death of Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who was the first patient in the U.S. to die of Ebola, is stirring debate in the Dallas Liberian community about whether there has been a difference in the quality of treatment between American and African patients with Ebola at U.S. hospitals.Stanley Gaye, president of the Liberia Community Association in Dallas, said people have contacted him about concerns that Duncan was treated differently, “because he was African and not only that, he was Liberian.”Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital explained Thursday in detail how they cared for Duncan, including assigning 50 people to help with Duncan's care and securing an entire intensive care unit for Duncan.However, Gaye told ABC News that one of the biggest concerns expressed by the Liberian community was that Duncan was allowed to leave that hospital on Sept. 25 even though he had early Ebola symptoms and had told a nurse there that he had recently traveled from West Africa.Hospital officials initially said that there was a lapse in the record keeping system that allowed Duncan to leave even though he met criteria from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicating he should be quarantined for possible Ebola infection. But they later said the system was functioning properly and have yet to give a further reason for the error.In Thursday's statement, the hospital denied Duncan had received substandard care during his first visit to the emergency room."Our care team provided Mr. Duncan with the same high level of attention and care that would be given any patient, regardless of nationality or ability to pay for care," read the statement, which clarified Duncan had a four-hour evaluation and numerous tests.Three days later, on Sept. 28, Duncan was taken back to the hospital in an ambulance and put into an isolation ward at the hospital, health officials said.Liberian community members have voiced concern that by not being admitted to the hospital immediately, the illness had time to make Duncan sicker and that “he was not properly taken care of,” Gaye said.Duncan died from the Ebola virus on Wednesday, more than a week after being admitted to Texas Presbyterian Hospital. The day before his death, hospital officials said he was on a respirator and being given kidney dialysis.He was also being given the experimental drug brincidofovir. Another Ebola patient, an American journalist being treated in Nebraska, has also started the same medication, health officials said.Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital officials revealed new details Thursday about Duncan's death and explained he had asked not to receive certain extraordinary measures, including chest compressions and defibrillation."In spite of the intensive care he was receiving, his heart stopped," the hospital said in its statement.The hospital also adamantly defended its treatment of Duncan and explained why he had not received some of the same medications other Ebola patients had been given. Duncan's family told reporters on Wednesday that Duncan had received "unfair" treatment compared to other patients who had been cared for in the U.S.“No one has died of Ebola in the U.S. before. This is the first time,” Weeks told ABC News.Weeks said the family asked doctors at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital why Duncan was not moved to Emory University Medical Center, where two missionaries were treated for Ebola earlier this year. Weeks said doctors told the family they had everything necessary to treat Duncan in Dallas.The CDC has not recommended that Ebola patients be transferred to a specialized isolation facility like the one at Emory University.Weeks also said doctors told the family Duncan was not given any donated plasma, called convalescent serum, from former Ebola patients. The hospital stated Thursday that Duncan's blood type was not compatible with convalescent serum donors.The hospital also affirmed that Duncan was not given ZMapp, a serum used on two U.S. healthcare workers, because the supply had been exhausted.At least one expert said this information is crucial to rebuilding trust between nervous community members and medical institutions.Art Caplan, a medical ethicist and director for Division of Medical Ethics at the New York University Langone Medical Center, said just the appearance of a hospital or medical institution treating patients differently can have severe negative consequences for public health during an epidemic.Caplan said if people don’t trust health authorities then they might not seek help when they’re sick and inadvertently infect others.“The key to fighting Ebola is trust. You want people to go to the hospital when they’re sick,” said Caplan.Caplan said it is a valid concern for the Liberian community to be distressed that Duncan was sent home from the hospital on Sept. 26. and that the hospital’s decision needs to be fully explained.“That demands a close investigation,” said Caplan. “You want the Liberian community to understand and want the world to understand” what happened.Gaye stressed that even though the Liberian community in Dallas is concerned over Duncan’s treatment, no one he has spoken to talked about avoiding the medical treatment if they show Ebola symptoms.Caplan also said that health officials should be even more upfront with information about exactly what is going on with a patient in an epidemic, especially if there is any chance people might think the patient is being treated unfairly.Caplan pointed out that a patient may not be given experimental treatments if their health is too far deteriorated, but that the information should all be made public so that people can understand the doctor’s decisions not to give medication.“In an epidemic, you have to chip away a little bit of privacy. You have public health goals that trump ethical situations,” said Caplan. “I think pushing a little bit further into what happens is key to public health.”

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Ebola Could Be ‘World’s Next AIDS,’ CDC Director Warns

Ebola Could Be ‘World’s Next AIDS,’ CDC Director Warns

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Ebola is spreading with such speed that it could become a global pandemic to rival AIDS if action isn't taken now, one of the U.S.'s top health officials has warned."In the 30 years I’ve been working public health, the only thing like this has been AIDS, and we have to work now so that this is not the world’s next AIDS," Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Wednesday.Frieden spoke at a conference at the World Bank in Washington D.C. Those in attendance included a group of African leaders from countries where the virus has spread."Speed is the most important variable here," Frieden said. "This is controllable and this is preventable. It's preventable by investing in core public health services, both in the epicenter of the most affected countries, in the surrounding countries, and in other countries that might be affected."The World Health Organization released a report on Wednesday that noted six countries -- five in West Africa and the United States -- that had been affected. The report notes, however, that the information they used was only accurate through Oct. 5, and just this week there was a confirmed case of Ebola in Spain when a nurse tested positive for the disease. That brings the number of affected countries to seven.The WHO report said the three countries with the worst situation were Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, which all have widespread and intense transmission. Representatives from those three countries were all present at the meeting when Frieden spoke.According to the WHO report, there had been 3,865 deaths as of Oct. 5 out of 8,033 confirmed cases. Those figures represent a 48 percent fatality rate.The death of Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who was diagnosed and later died from Ebola in Dallas, was not included in those numbers. His death on Wednesday marked the first time someone in America had died from the disease.

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Couple Welcomes Terminal ‘Bucket List’ Baby, Then Says Goodbye

Couple Welcomes Terminal ‘Bucket List’ Baby, Then Says Goodbye

BananaStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) -- The Pennsylvania couple that carried out a heartbreaking bucket list for an unborn baby with a terminal condition announced the birth of the boy on Thursday, and his death a few hours later."Today at 6:15 a.m., after meeting his entire family and being baptized into the Catholic faith, baby Shane died peacefully in his Mother's arms," Jenna and Dan Haley of Philadelphia wrote in a Facebook message. "We are so grateful for the time that we were blessed to hold and hug our son."Shane was diagnosed with anencephaly, a brain defect in which a baby is born without parts of its brain and skull and isn't expected to survive. Almost all babies die shortly after birth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The couple told ABC News in an earlier interview they learned of the condition in April and decided they wanted to make the most of Shane's life by creating a bucket list they would tackle while Jenna Haley was pregnant."He's still our little boy and even though he's been given such a short life expectancy because of anencephaly, we wanted to make sure that we gave him a lifetime worth of adventures and love while he's with us," Dan Haley said last month.The parents created a Facebook page "Prayers for Shane" to chronicle their adventures, from visiting a pumpkin patch to a Phillies game. They also went to beaches, zoos, the Statue of Liberty and the 9/11 memorial in New York City.Shane, whose due date was Oct. 12, came a few days early on Thursday. He was born at 2:25 a.m., according to the Facebook page, and died a few hours later.The couple hoped their journey, while bittersweet, will inspire others."One thing we would want people to take away is that each human life is so valuable and that it's important to live each day to its fullest potential," Dan Haley said last month.

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Researchers Identify Five Lifestyle Factors Linked to Reduced Stroke Risk in Women

Researchers Identify Five Lifestyle Factors Linked to Reduced Stroke Risk in Women

Jochen Sands/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study identified five low-risk lifestyle factors linked to reduced risk of stroke in women.The study, published in the journal Neurology, named a healthy diet, moderate alcohol consumption, never smoking, engaging in physical activity and a body mass index below 25 as being connected with reduced risk of stroke. The more of those five factors women adhered to within the study, the lower their risk of stroke became, researchers said.The study looked at data from nearly 32,000 Swedish women. Researchers said that women who were able to abide by all five characteristics lowered the risk of total stroke by over 50 percent.The healthy lifestyle even lowered stroke risk in women with diseases typically linked to stokes, such as high blood cholesterol and hypertension.Researchers classified healthy diet as being within the top 50 percent of a recommended food score measuring frequency of eating healthy foods, physical activity as walking or biking for 40 minutes per day and one hour of vigorous activity per week and moderate alcohol consumption as three to nine drinks per week.Hemorrhagic strokes, which represent 15 percent of all strokes, were not, however, found to be reduced by following lifestyle guidelines.

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Sugar Doesn’t Sweeten Memory Functions

Sugar Doesn’t Sweeten Memory Functions

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- How many more reasons do parents need to discourage their teens from drinking massive quantities of sugar-sweetened soda or energy drinks?University of South California researchers have come up with another: sugar intake seems to damage the memory and other cognitive functions.Rather than experiment on humans, Scott Kanoski and his team fed one group of rats a substantial amount of sugar or high-fructose corn syrup that added up to nearly 40 percent of their caloric intake. Then, all the rats ran through a maze.What happened was that spatial memory of adolescent rats that consumed high amounts of sugar or HFCS was most affected as they did worse in the maze test than any other group.Kanoski surmises that sugar and HFCS cause inflammation of the hippocampus, which controls memory formation. This damage to the hippocampus is also responsible for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in older adults.

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Sandwiches Are Usually Loaded with Sodium

Sandwiches Are Usually Loaded with Sodium

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Making and consuming a sandwich is a quick, easy and delicious way to nourish one’s self. Of course, like everything that’s good these days, there always seem to be a bad side.

And in this case, it’s that sandwiches are almost always chock full of sodium, which health officials say contributes to hypertension and all the illnesses associated with it.The Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service says that a single sandwich delivers 20 percent of one’s sodium intake per day. And since almost half of Americans consume a sandwich, which also includes hot dogs and hamburgers, people are likely getting more salt than what’s healthy.What the study also revealed is that sandwich eaters also have a higher energy rate than other Americans.Since that’s the case, ARS nutritionist Cecilia Wilkinson says that it’s important then to replace high-sodium ingredients with lower sodium foods.

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Hundreds of Thousands of Bees Found After Men Are Attacked

Hundreds of Thousands of Bees Found After Men Are Attacked

iStock/Thinkstock(DOUGLAS, Ariz.) -- Hundreds of thousands of bees were discovered in a giant hive after some had attacked landscapers in Douglas, Arizona, Wednesday, killing one man and injuring another.According to the Arizona Daily Star, the men were chased after turning on lawnmowers outside the home of a developmentally disabled adult.Douglas police said as they were trying to fend off an onslaught of bees, the landscapers ran to a neighbor's house who then called 9-1-1.The unidentified dead man, who was 32, suffered a fatal heart attack after being stung repeatedly in the head and neck. Another man received 100 stings and was later released from the hospital.Exterminators were also called in by firefighters to destroy a hive measuring four feet by six feet found in the attic of the home. They said upwards of 800,000 bees lived inside the hive.Meanwhile, the 90-year-old man who owned the residence was not harmed.

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Shared Experiences Are More Intense than Going It Alone

Shared Experiences Are More Intense than Going It Alone

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW HAVEN, Conn.) -- Shared experiences seem to be better or worse than those that one goes through alone, according to a Yale University study.Leader researcher Erica Boothby had female participants eat chocolate by themselves and then with someone else, who turned out to be another researcher.As it happened, the participants rated the chocolate as tastier whenever there was another person eating a piece as well.In the second experiment, the participants were given bitter chocolate, which they rated as more unpleasant whenever someone else shared a piece.Although she only conducted the small study with women, Boothby says that shared experiences appear to be more intense whether with people we know well or even total strangers.

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Here’s The Right Amount to Spend on an Engagement Ring

Here’s The Right Amount to Spend on an Engagement Ring

iStock/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- Guys who don’t go overboard when it comes to spending money on an engagement ring may be doing their future wives a favor.Economic professors at Emory University say that by keeping their budget for a ring between $500 and $2,000, men and women improve their chances for a stronger marriage.Without getting too much into the reasons why, men who pay between $2,000 and $4,000 for an engagement ring increased their chances of a broken marriage by 1.3 times.However, going super cheap is not helpful either. The risk of divorce also rose when the ring cost under $500.As for the price of the wedding itself, couples spending more than $20,000 were 3.5 times more likely to head for divorce court than people who came in at between $5,000 and $10,000.

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Study: Childhood Obesity Linked to Changes in Heart Structure

Study: Childhood Obesity Linked to Changes in Heart Structure

moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A German medical study found signs that childhood obesity causes structural changes to children's hearts that may impact those children's risk of heart problems as they age.Researchers said the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, looked at the hearts of 101 young teens. Of the same, 61 were considered obese and 40 were not. The obese teens, researchers said, had significant changes in heart structure and function.The study did not directly link those changes with cardiac problems, but noted that they could impact future heart health.

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Researchers Testing Prosthetics That Could Restore Sense of Touch in Amputees

Researchers Testing Prosthetics That Could Restore Sense of Touch in Amputees

Vladislav Ociacia/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers at Case Western Reserve University say they have developed the next generation of prosthetics, which provide hand amputees the ability to feel "touch."The study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, involved the implanting of electrodes into the upper arms of two amputees, which enabled them to generate unique impulses that allowed the amputees to sense fine touch, firm touch and pressure. That amputees were also better able to complete difficult routine tasks -- such as plucking the stem from a cherry -- when they could "feel."Researchers also said that the amputees claimed the implant eliminated the feeling of a "phantom hand," or pain caused by the brain's interpretation that the hand is still there.A separate study in Sweden involving the implantation of electrodes directly into a patient's bone gave him the ability to manipulate the prostheses via feedback from his brain. Researchers in each study have eliminated the use of surface electrodes, previously the only way to allow for independent control of the prostheses. Further testing will likely be required before the technology is made widely available.

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Deputy Who Delivered Ebola Quarantine Order in Hospital ER

Deputy Who Delivered Ebola Quarantine Order in Hospital ER

Will Montgomery(DALLAS) -- A sheriff's deputy who helped serve a quarantine order on the apartment where Texas Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan had been staying is being examined at a Dallas hospital for "possible exposure to the Ebola virus."The deputy was admitted to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas on Wednesday."Right now, there are more questions than answers about this case," the hospital said in a statement.The deputy, who was not identified, did not have contact with Duncan, who was hospitalized at the time the quarantine order was issued, and is not considered a high risk person, a Dallas County official told ABC News. "Our professional staff of nurses and doctors is prepared to examine the patient, discuss any findings with appropriate agencies and officials. We are on alert with precautions and systems in place," the hospital said.Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was asked about the patient.“There is someone who does not have either definite contact or definite symptoms of Ebola, who is being assessed,” Frieden said.“We are tracing the other 48 people” who were exposed to Duncan, he said. “None of them as of today have had fever or symptoms of Ebola.”"We’re at peak incidence period of symptoms which is eight to 10 days after exposure," Frieden said.

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