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‘Deflate-gate’ Is Scientifically Plausible, Physicist Says

‘Deflate-gate’ Is Scientifically Plausible, Physicist Says

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- If the NFL's New England Patriots did deflate their game balls, even slightly, it would have given them an advantage during their playoff win this past weekend, said Chang Kee Jung, who teaches a course on the physics of sports at Stony Brook University in Long Island, New York.Ninety percent of the time, you want a ball that’s properly pumped to give you the furthest throwing trajectory, Jung said. But when in bad weather, a squishier ball is easier to throw and catch.“On cold days, a fully inflated ball is...hard as a brick,” he said. “Having a softer ball would allow the quarterback to throw more accurately in a tighter spiral and make it easier for the receiver to catch.”If a quarterback has small hands, a mushier ball would offer even more of an edge in the rain, making it easier for him to grip, Jung added.

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What Your Tweets May Say About Your Heart Health

What Your Tweets May Say About Your Heart Health

iStock Editorial(PHILADELPHIA) -- Tweeting a lot of four-letter words about how miserable you are or how much you hate stuff? It may offer a glimpse into your heart health, new research shows.University of Pennsylvania researchers studied 140 million random tweets from 2009 and 2010, and learned that what people said on the social media site correlated with heart disease mortality rates where those tweets originated. Twitter data also served as a window into psychological status, said lead researcher Johannes Eichstaedt, a Ph.D. candidate at the university."The single most predictive feature -- the single word predictor of heart disease -- is 'hate,'" Eichstaedt said. "You couldn't make this up."The study was published this week in the journal Psychological Science.Eichstaedt said communities where people tweeted more about hostility, hatred and fatigue were also more likely to have higher rates of heart disease, according to data from Twitter and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. On the flip side, areas where people tweeted about optimism seemed to have lower rates of heart disease, he said.The researchers did not have access to the health status of individual Twitter users.Having a reason to get out of bed in the morning seemed to be a protective factor when it came to heart disease, but the data predates the "#blessed" Twitter trend, Eichstaedt said. Getting the data from the social media giant today would be much more difficult and expensive, he said.Cardiologist Dr. Sahil Parikh, at UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, said he applauds the researchers' creativity but said readers should take the results with a "very large grain of salt."

He said it's "reasonable" to say that negative emotions related to stress can predict heart disease events because there's a significant body of research to back that up. But the age difference between social media users and people having heart attacks doesn't match up, he noted.Men are considered more at risk for heart disease and heart attacks when they reach 55 years old, and women are considered more at risk at 65 years old, Parikh said."I don’t know how many 65-, 75-year-old women are out there tweeting," he said. "While there might be a lot of angry young people in a a certain area, I'm not sure how well that correlates with emotional well-being in those who are older and not Twitter users."Eichstaedt said his team's research piggybacked on research about word frequency and psychological insight as well as their own work analyzing social media data. Eichstaedt's next project will be to see whether the Twitter data has any indication for other health issues, such as diabetes and cancer.

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Woman Repays Kindness of Adoptive Father by Donating Kidney to Him

Woman Repays Kindness of Adoptive Father by Donating Kidney to Him

Brandi Hicks(NEW YORK) -- Brandi Hicks said she learned selflessness and the spirit of giving from her adoptive parents starting from when she was 6 months old and they took her in. Thirty years later, she's giving back by donating her kidney to the man she knows only as "dad."Even though the two aren't biologically related, Hicks' kidney was a match for her father, Larry Hicks, 71. And she didn't hesitate to go under the knife for him."This is how they raised us," Hicks, 30, said of her adoptive parents. Her late brother died in 2004. "We believe that you treat others how you want to be treated."Hicks said she offered to give her father a kidney five years ago because he was on dialysis, but he said he wouldn't let her because she'd just had a little boy.

Last summer, he asked her if she was still willing to do it, and she didn't hesitate to say yes, she recalled. They underwent their respective surgeries on Tuesday, and when Hicks visited her father on Wednesday, she said he looked completely different."He had the biggest smile came on his face," Hicks said. "He looks at least 20 to 30 times better."Not only do kidneys from living donors last longer than those from deceased donors, but transplants are "life-changing" to people who have been on dialysis, said Dr. David Shaffer, chief of kidney and pancreas transplantation at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where the surgeries took place.And the sooner someone can get off dialysis, the better their prognosis, he said.Kidney transplants from people who aren't related aren't perfect matches, but they work as long as their blood types match, Shaffer said.Of the 24,383 kidney transplants that took place in 2014, 4,777 came from living donors, according to data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, the organization under contract with the federal government to allocate organs and manage transplant waiting lists.

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Bacon and Kale Lose Favor with Americans

Bacon and Kale Lose Favor with Americans

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Who liked kale in the first place?The leafy vegetable is not so popular anymore with Americans, according to Zagat's 2015 National Dining Trends Survey of over 10,700 diners across 17 major American cities.Just 27 percent of respondents said they loved kale while 36 percent admitted that they're "over it."  The rest don't mind kale or have no opinion about it.Perhaps even more surprising is America's attitude toward bacon. Thirty-four percent in the Zagat survey claim they're "over" bacon while 28 percent still profess a love for the pork product.But the biggest shocker of all is that a majority of people either love or don't mind Brussels sprouts. Only 18 percent said they were "over it."The survey also found that the average amount spent on dinner at a restaurant was $39.40 and 81 percent of respondents have sent food back to the kitchen. The same percentage admitted they've eavesdropped on other diners' conversations.

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College Freshmen’s Grades Hurt Most by Time on Facebook

College Freshmen’s Grades Hurt Most by Time on Facebook

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(AMES, Iowa) — One thing that new college students might hear from their parents as they head off to school is to focus on their grades and not to spend so much time on Facebook.Well, it’s wishful thinking on the part of mom and dad but does time spent on Facebook really hurt a college freshman’s GPA?  The answer is complicated, according to Iowa State University researcher Reynol Junco.He says that compared to the other levels of college, freshman are hurt most by their time on Facebook when it comes to GPA as time spent on the social networking site often occurred while they’re doing schoolwork.However, Junco says their grades are hurt, not so much by going on Facebook, but due to adjustment problems that come from being away from home for the first time and not having someone telling them frequently what to do.Meanwhile, as students continue on their way up through college, Facebook’s effect on grades wanes. By the time they become seniors, there was no noticeable relationship between Facebook and GPA.In fact, Junco goes as far to say that being online with friends seemed to have a positive impact on GPA.

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Blogger Ignites Controversy by Banning ‘Lustful’ Leggings from Her Wardrobe

Blogger Ignites Controversy by Banning ‘Lustful’ Leggings from Her Wardrobe

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Whether as a fashion statement or just for pure comfort, Rihanna, Olivia Wilde and others are on the list of the many women who wear leggings as pants. But now, one woman in Oregon is taking a stand against the hip-hugging garments, claiming leggings inspire lust.“Women today wearing leggings often can cause men to think of them sexually or lust after them,” Veronica Partridge said on ABC’s Good Morning America.Leggings have recently become more popular for women to wear as pants, according to Business Insider retail editor Ashley Lutz.“It’s huge in retail right now,” she said on GMA. “You have it being acceptable for the first time in history for women to wear leggings wherever they want.”Veronica has vowed to stop wearing the so-called “ath-leisure” trend in public, a proclamation inspired by her husband Dale Partridge’s opinion. He told her it’s hard not to look at women wearing leggings.“I just truly wanted to be honest and say I know men talk about it all the time,” Dale said on GMA. “I know how men think. It’s a man’s responsibility, we get that, but at the end of the day, it’s not a bad thing that a woman is supporting us in not looking at them that way.”Veronica blogged about her decision, writing, “If it is difficult for my husband to keep his eyes focused ahead, then how much more difficult could it be for a man that may not have the same self-control?”Veronica’s blog post went viral, getting more than 30,000 Facebook shares and sparking comments such as, “Not wearing leggings is not a magic bullet that will stop men from looking…”Others, though, agree with Veronica. A Huffington Post article on the issue asked men what they think, and some responses were “I personally think it's hot,” and, “I won't take you seriously as a person.”Despite the firestorm on social media, Veronica said she’s not trying to start a movement and was just sharing her story on how the skin-tight pants are too snug for her comfort.“I cannot control how a man thinks of me,” she said. “But I don’t want to encourage or entice those thoughts.”

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California Department of Public Health Confirms 59 Cases of Measles, 42 Linked to Disneyland

California Department of Public Health Confirms 59 Cases of Measles, 42 Linked to Disneyland

Photo by David McNew/Getty Images(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- The California Department of Public Health says it has confirmed 59 cases of measles in the state since the end of December 2014, 42 of which are linked to the exposure at Disneyland or Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim.Included in those figures are five Disney employees, the CDPH confirmed Wednesday. The agency also says that cases linked to the Disney parks have been found in Mexico, Utah, Washington, Colorado and Oregon. The individuals who have contracted the disease in California range from seven months to 70 years old. At least 28 of those in California were not vaccinated against the disease.The CDPH says that vaccination is the foremost key to preventing measles, and that two doses of the MMR vaccine (for measles, mumps and rubella) are more than 99 percent effective in preventing the disease.While the measles have been eradicated in the United States since 2000, measles outbreaks can still occur in other nations, and locations where international travelers may go -- such as airports and theme parks -- could result in domestic transmission of the disease.

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For Older Adults, Any Exercise Is Better than None

For Older Adults, Any Exercise Is Better than None

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers say that when it comes to exercise, any amount is better than none, even if you can't meet the World Health Organization's target of 150 minutes per week. While that WHO figure may be doable for younger adults, researchers were concerned that some older adults may not find 150 minutes per week feasible. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, looked at 250,000 American adults between the ages of 50 and 71, and found that even one hour of moderate physical activity per week could reduce risk of premature death.Moderate exercise includes activities like brisk walking, according to the study. One hour per week of such activities could reduce risk of dying by as much as 15 percent. If the amount of time spent exercising is dropped to 20 minutes, but is made "intensive" instead of "moderate," risk of premature death fell by 23 percent. Researchers say health and medical organizations should work to come up with guidelines other than the 150-minutes-per-week goal set by the WHO.

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Study: Women May Not Need to Limit Fish Intake During Pregnancy

Study: Women May Not Need to Limit Fish Intake During Pregnancy

JackF/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study says that women may not need to limit fish intake during pregnancy out of fear of exposing their unborn child to mercury.Researchers tested the hair and blood of over 1,200 pregnant women and compared them to behavioral questionnaires and surveys on their children. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, says that the mothers and their children were observed from pregnancy until their children turned 20 months old. No link was found between prenatal mercury exposure and the neurological development of children. While current U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines recommend pregnant women avoid overconsumption of fish, this study questions whether the benefits of fish consumption may outweigh harm.

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McDonald’s Reveals Exactly How Your Beloved Fries Are Made

McDonald’s Reveals Exactly How Your Beloved Fries Are Made

McDonald's(NEW YORK) -- Ah, McDonald’s French fries. It’s hard to find someone who doesn’t like the American classic, regardless of their thoughts on the fast food chain.It’s always been a bit hazy, though, how exactly McDonald’s makes their addictive potato sticks -- until now. McDonald’s released a video detailing the process, which we’ve broken down for you below, along with registered dietician Georgie Fear’s take on the ingredients.Step 1: Peel, Cut and BlanchThe fast food chain uses non-GMO potatoes, including shepody, ranger russet, Umatilla russet and russet Burbank varieties. Once arrived at the plant, the potatoes are peeled and forced through a cutter at 65 MPH to make uniform fries. They’re then briefly immersed in hot water to remove excess natural sugars for color reasons. According to McDonald’s, blanching also eliminates enzymatic activity which prevents spoilage and develops a fluffy interior, similar to a baked potato, for better texture.Step 2: Dip in “Ingredient Bath”This is the most unnatural step of the process. The now-cut and blanched fries are dipped in an “ingredient bath” which consists of dextrose and sodium acid pyrophosphate. The dextrose, a natural form of sugar, is to help achieve a uniform golden color and the sodium acid pyrophosphate prevents the potatoes from turning grayish after they are cooked, according to McDonald’s.Fear said these ingredients are of no health concern. “Dextrose is simply a sugar that occurs naturally in our blood,” the author of Lean Diet told ABC News. “As for the sodium acid pyrophosphate, when potatoes are cut and then exposed to air, they turn a green, greyish-brown color which isn’t very appealing to the end consumer. This chemical keeps them nice and white-looking. To my knowledge there is no data of any health concerns from sodium acid pyrophosphate.”Step 3: Dry & Quick FryNext, the fries are dried and partially fried to ensure a crisp exterior. McDonald’s not only fries the potatoes in a mix of oils – canola, soybean and hydrogenated soybean – but also adds natural beef flavor derived from beef fat that contains wheat and milk derivatives for flavor, citric acid for preservation and dimethylpolysiloxane to reduce oil foaming and extend the quality of the oil life, according to McDonald’s.The only thing to note about the beef fat for Fear is that it makes the French fries no longer vegetarian, and for those with wheat or milk allergies, the fries could trigger reactions.“Wheat is often used for non-clumping. I do not know McDonald’s’ process at all but my expectation would be that the wheat and milk derivatives are added to the flavoring to make it a usable powder,” Fear said. “Citric acid is completely benign found in fruit. I haven’t heard of dimethylpolysiloxane, but since I work in the health field I would probably have heard of it if it were a health concern.”Step 4: Flash FreezeThe fries are then flash frozen, which is how they arrive at the restaurants.Step 5: Ship & Cook in RestaurantsWhen you’re ready to order, the restaurants cook the fries for a third time, frying them in more oil. This time, it’s a vegetable oil blend of canola, corn, soybean and hydrogenated soybean oils. There’s also TBHQ, an antioxidant that extends the shelf life of the oil and acts as a preservative for the oil, citric acid for freshness and more dimethylpolysiloxane to help reduce oil spattering, according to McDonald’s."TBHQ is an antioxidant that prevents oil from going rancid,” Fear explained. “The Food & Drug Administration as well as the European Food Safety Administration have both determined it to be safe in quantities under .02%, so as long as McDonald’s is not adding it above the legal limit, there should be no concerns.”Finally, the chain adds salt after the fries are cooked, though you can request unsalted.Out of the 19 ingredients in the French fries, surprisingly only one is of concern to Fear.“For the consumers, they see this long list of more than 10 ingredients and many of them look like big, long, alien chemicals. However to a nutritionist with expertise in biochemistry, the one that makes me not eat McDonald’s French fries is hydrogenated oil,” Fear said. “Hydrogenated oils are a source of trans fat, which is shown to be negative for human health in many ways.”Hydrogenated fat is often present in solid shortening, vegetable shortening and some margarine. Liquid canola and vegetables oils do not contain it.

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European Food Safety Authority: No Health Risk from BPA

European Food Safety Authority: No Health Risk from BPA

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The European Food Safety Authority released an opinion on Wednesday stating that bisphenol A, a chemical used in many plastics, poses no health risks.According to the EFSA, humans can be exposed to BPA through diet, in drinking water, by inhalation, or through physical contact with products made with BPA. Some previous research has speculated that increased exposure to the chemical could cause adverse effects including neurodevelopment, cancer or infertility, among others. However, the EFSA found that exposure to BPA was "considerably under" the "tolerable daily intake."The agency says that high doses of BPA -- hundreds of times above the tolerable daily intake -- are "likely" to affect the kidney and liver, and perhaps have negative effects on mammary glands. Other health effects, including cardiovascular, nervous, reproductive, immune and metabolic system effects -- and the development of cancer -- were not considered likely.However, the actual dietary exposure to BPA, the EFSA said, was four to 15 times lower than previously believed, depending on the age group involved.Using what they believe is a typical intake of BPA, the EFSA determined that "there is no health concern for any age group from dietary exposure or from aggregated exposure."

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Does Cracking Your Knuckles Cause Arthritis?

Does Cracking Your Knuckles Cause Arthritis?

Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Some do it as a nervous tick. Others like the sound. Still, others find it to be a form of stress-relief. But does cracking your knuckles now mean you are doomed to suffer from arthritis later?Despite warnings from your grandparents that you’ll suffer a life of arthritis if you sit around cracking your knuckles, this myth has been busted.“Here’s what really happens,” Dr. Debbie Yi, an Emergency Medicine and Neurology physician at the Hospital of UPenn says. “When you crack your knuckles you are actually just expanding [the] joint capsule.”While we wouldn’t recommend you sit around passing the time by cracking your knuckles, Dr. Yi says, “It’s never ever been proven in research that knuckle cracking actually causes arthritis.”

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Terminally Ill ‘Super Fan’ Scores Front-Row Patriots Tickets

Terminally Ill ‘Super Fan’ Scores Front-Row Patriots Tickets

Cathy Nichols(NEW YORK) -- Cathy Nichols and son Jason were front and center at the National Football League playoff game last Sunday to witness her beloved New England Patriots clinch a spot in this year’s Super Bowl.The Fayette, Maine, resident, 59, had been diagnosed with terminal cancer just two days before the big game. She said it was the support of a close-knit community, and the generosity of the Patriots, that brought her to what she believed will be the last football game she will attend.“My son and I are super fans and when I got the diagnosis, I told him we probably weren’t going to get to go to many more games,” Nichols told ABC News Wednesday. “Now, not only did I get to see them play, but I was at a playoff game; it was just unbelievable.”Nichols’ worship of Tom Brady and all things Patriots is well known at Spruce Mountain High School in Jay, Maine, where she works as a special education teacher. So when she confided in several work friends about her illness, they immediately contacted a local sportscaster, who, in turn, reached out to the Patriots.By Friday night, a team representative had called Nichols to offer her two tickets in the owner’s box to the playoff game.Despite her rollercoaster of a week, Nichols said she was touched by the outpouring from friends and strangers alike.“It isn't just the tickets, they’re doing fund-raisers and I’m getting calls from students and athletes I coached more than 25 years ago,” the former cheerleader coach said.At Sunday’s game she not only had the best seats in the house, she was given field passes so she could watch the pregame warm-ups. Team owner Robert Kraft even called down to the field to make sure she was having a good time, before she returned to the box.Nichols said she knows an invite to the Super Bowl was in the works but she put a stop to it. Doctors believe the disease may have already spread from her pancreases to her liver, she said, and she may only have six months to live. She doesn't feel strong enough to make the trip to Arizona for the February game.But Nichols said she isn't bitter. Far from it.“I am a very fortunate woman to have all this support and it makes me determined to be here as long as I can,” she said. “But I've lived a good life and I want to focus on quality of life over quantity.”

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New Pill Could Cure Jet Lag

New Pill Could Cure Jet Lag

Photos.com/Thinkstock(MONTREAL) — Ever wished there was a pill you could pop to avoid the dreaded jet lag when you’ve crossed at least three time zones?Well, there is such a pill that was developed by scientists at McGill University and Douglas Mental Health University in Canada.In essence, the new drug contains the steroid-based compound glucocorticoid, which affects white blood cells that manage our circadian rhythm or internal body clock.The drug, which was tested on 16 people, resets the clock in people experiencing jet lag to reduce the fatigue that can last for hours or even days.Although not yet commercially available, the new medication has other applications as well, including helping shift workers deal with potentially devastating schedule changes, which can be detrimental to long-term health.

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Working in an Auto Factory Is Risky Business

Working in an Auto Factory Is Risky Business

iStock/Thinkstock(EAST LANSING, Mich.) — Working in a factory that manufactures automobiles can be a killer -- literally.Michigan State University researchers looked at the case histories of 190 autoworkers in Lansing and Pontiac, taking into account risk factors that include blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking and obesity.Led by MSU professor of medicine Ved Gossain, the team discovered the autoworkers were at a higher risk of dying from heart disease and diabetes than the general population.Gossain said they didn’t have to probe too much to learn just over half of the workers were obese while more than a third were considered overweight.

Two-thirds also had high levels of bad cholesterol compared to 31 percent of the general population.Although the 16 percent of workers who smoked was below the national average of 18 percent, it was also discovered that another 58 percent had been smokers, which also increases the chances of premature death.

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Millennials to Soon Outnumber Baby Boomers

Millennials to Soon Outnumber Baby Boomers

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — It’s been a nice run, baby boomers, but now it’s time to cede the number one spot to a new generation.The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that at some point this year, millennials, those aged 18-to-34, will number 75.3 million. That surpasses the boomers’ 74.9 million. Baby boomers are those individuals born between 1946 and 1964.The baby boomers got their name because of the explosion of births following World War Two when the country experienced unprecedented economic expansion.But although there were ten million more boomer births than those people born between 1981 and 1997, millennials will move past that generation this year because of the influx of young immigrants over the past couple of decades.Meanwhile, the White House says in its report about millennials that they “stand out because they are the most diverse and educated generation to date: 42 percent identify with a race or ethnicity other than non-Hispanic white, around twice the share of the baby boomer generation when they were the same age.”

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Increased Coffee Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Developing Melanoma

Increased Coffee Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Developing Melanoma

violetkaipa/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new study linked the amount of coffee you drink with your risk of developing melanoma.Researchers looked at data from 450,000 cancer-free participants from a health and diet study. By comparing the amount of coffee the participants consumed to their risk of melanoma, they were able to determine that their risk of developing the disease was moderately lower.That fact remained consistent even when adjusted for other health factors that could influence melanoma risk, such as body mass index, exposure to ultraviolet light, age, sex, smoking status and alcohol intake. In fact, those who drank more than four cups of coffee daily were 20 percent less likely to develop the disease.This study, however, only indicates an association, and not that drinking more coffee causes the lower risk.

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Sea Snail’s Weird Hunting Method Sheds New Light on Insulin

Sea Snail’s Weird Hunting Method Sheds New Light on Insulin

Credit: Jeff Rotman/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The questionably cute but slimy sea snail has a secret weapon for capturing its prey, scientists have discovered.The cone snails have a high level of insulin in their venom that allow them to render small schools of fish sluggish by either shooting the potent venom into the water or via a harpoon-like sting.Next, the sluggish snails can then catch up to their prey and feast, according to a study from researchers at the University of Utah that was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Scientists tested a synthetic version of the insulin on zebrafish and found that it caused blood glucose levels to fall and created a noticeable change in the swimming behavior of the fish."This is a unique type of insulin. It is shorter than any insulin that has been described in any animal," Baldomero Olivera, a biology professor and an author of the study, said in a statement. "We found it in the venom in large amounts."The insulin has just 43 amino acid building blocks, making it shorter than any other known insulin, researchers said, noting that when the insulin mixes with venom, it creates a cocktail that is able to quickly slow down schools of fish and put them in hypoglycemic shock.Aside from the ick and cool factors of the discovery, researchers said it could also be used to help them better understand how energy is metabolized in humans.

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How Kelly Rowland Bounced Back After Baby

How Kelly Rowland Bounced Back After Baby

Tiffany Rose/Getty Images for TW Steel USA Inc.(LOS ANGELES) -- Kelly Rowland didn't waste any time getting her figure back after giving birth to her first child in November.Now, the Destiny's Child singer is offering fans a chance to follow the same fitness and eating plan designed by trainer Jeanette Jenkins that helped her get back into her skinny jeans a short seven weeks after giving birth."Kelly Rowland just had her baby Titan in November and she is on board & motivated to get her body back just like so many of you! Kelly is excited to share her journey & motivate others while she goes through the journey herself!" Jenkins wrote on her blog.The pair are calling it the "6 Week Get Your Body Back Challenge with Kelly Rowland & Jeanette Jenkins."On Jenkins' blog are six weeks of "workouts, motivation, nutrition and healthy living tips."The seven-day healthy eating plan that Rowland has been using includes plenty of veggies and fruits."I recommend using all organic foods, farm raised, grass fed and local farmers with no antibiotics, hormones, pesticides or chemicals. To have healthy cells and a healthy body you must eat quality food," Jenkins wrote on her blog, alongside a week of meals and snacks.She also suggested preparing meals at home, eating three green vegetables a day, drinking two to three cups of green tea daily and drinking half of your body weight in water each day.As for exercise, Rowland rotates five fitness DVDs, including sexy abs and cardio sculpt, bikini bootcamp and power yoga.Jenkins lays out a six-day a week workout plan, with Sunday as a day to "rest, relax and recover."Rowland and her husband, Tim Witherspoon, welcomed their son, Titan, on Nov. 4.

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How Mia Farrow and 30 Artists Are Highlighting the Importance of Vaccines

How Mia Farrow and 30 Artists Are Highlighting the Importance of Vaccines

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A new collection of artwork commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation highlights the global impact of vaccines on preventable diseases.More than 30 world-renowned artists participated in the project, including actress Mia Farrow and photographer Annie Leibovitz. The renowned group of musicians, writers, filmmakers, painters, sculptors and photographers from all around the world aimed to demonstrate how vaccines continue to positively change the course of history.“The Art of Saving a Life showcases the remarkable history of vaccines, their impact saving lives today, and their potential to save the lives of even more children from infectious diseases,” said Chris Elias, president of the Global Development Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.Alexia Sinclair’s stunning photo is a stylized recreation of Dr. Edward Jenner, an 18th-century physician, inoculating James Phipps, the first person to receive the smallpox vaccine.Farrow had polio as a child and her 10-year-old son Thaddeus was left paralyzed by the disease. Farrow photographed a woman in the Sudan who was similarly paralyzed by polio to demonstrate her strength and resilience.A sculpture by British artist Katharine Dawson represents the tragedy of a dancer whose career was cut short by polio. When the rest of her troupe opted for vaccination, she decided against it. One month later she was diagnosed with the disease, which left her paralyzed and unable to dance or even walk again.German painter Thomas Ganter chose to paint the Unknown Health Worker to represent the people in every country who do their best to offer lifesaving services, including immunization. It was inspired by a health care worker in eastern Nepal who was carrying vaccine boxes on her shoulder.With more than 20 million children globally in need of vaccination, artist Sophie Blackall wanted to illustrate the idea of how finding them can be like searching for a needle in a haystack. She represents how, in many cases, they are found and given the vaccinations and health services they need.

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