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Plus-Size Blogger’s Bikini Pic Goes Viral

Plus-Size Blogger’s Bikini Pic Goes Viral

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — When author and blogger Jenny Trout made her New Year’s resolution in January to wear a two-piece bikini, her goal was not to lose weight.Instead, Trout, a 33-year-old mother from Delton, Michigan, told followers of her blog, Trout Nation, that “this isn’t a weight loss goal because I don’t intend to lose weight to achieve it.”Trout held true to her resolution, posing last month in a floral two-piece bikini on the shores of Michigan’s Lake Superior.“I thought that this would be a good way to show people that it is not as scary as it sounds,” Trout told ABC News. “Look, if I could do it, you could too.”“Doing this was a really big leap for me,” she said.Trout wrote about the experience on her own blog and for Huffington Post in a post that has now gone viral.“The reason these people do not want to see a fat body in a bikini is because traditionally, that garment is something a woman earns by proving herself attractive enough to exist,” Trout wrote.The blog received over 300,000 likes on Facebook and comments like, “She’s beautiful,” “She looks fantastic” and “Good for her.”The post also had its critics, with one commenter writing, “Fat isn’t just a look…it’s unhealthy.”Body-image expert and the founder of “Break Free Beauty” Sarah Maria says the conflicting viewpoints are not surprising.“We live in a culture that is very judgmental about the size of your body,” Maria told ABC News. “When someone like Jenny says, ‘I can wear a bikini if I want to regardless of what people think,’ it sparks a lot of debate.”Trout says she hopes her bikini experience is inspiring. “If I could help someone push the limit, that would be the best thing in the world,” she said.
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Cheryl Burke Condemns Body Bullies, Plastic Surgery Rumors

Cheryl Burke Condemns Body Bullies, Plastic Surgery Rumors

ABC/Craig Sjodin(LOS ANGELES) — Like many stars do, when dancer Cheryl Burke was on vacation in Cabo, Mexico, she decided to share a few photos with fans via her Facebook page.She did not expect the bullying comments that would follow. While some attacked her figure, saying she has lost too much weight, others accused her of getting plastic surgery on her face.”It’s one thing to see negative comments about yourself in the press, it’s another to be criticized by individual people on your own social media pages,” Burke told ABC News. “It’s much more personal. It hurts.”The Dancing With the Stars pro, 30, is no stranger to controversy and even defended her 15-pound weight loss in May. But this latest round of insults caught her by surprise.”I’ve been lucky enough to have a great group of fans who have always posted incredibly kind things on my pages. I was actually looking forward to posting vacation photos since I’ve been eating healthy and feeling so good,” she said. “I totally let my guard down and wasn’t expecting people to start hurling insults, especially things about me having fake lips and plastic surgery? That’s literally crazy. There are other photos where my lips look like that. I started thinking about re-posting those photos and then I realized I had to take a step back.”What really shocked her were the people who made the mean comments. Burke noted that many of the commenters are adults, judging by their photos. Some of them even have children in their profile pictures.”I’ve had some time to think about it all and I’ve found strength in just letting it go. I can’t let myself get hurt by it. I also can’t shut down and not post anything online,” she said. “There are all different types of people out there who are going to say all kinds of things, online and in real life. The important thing is to know which ones to listen to.”
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Study: Sex Addiction and Porn Addiction Trigger Similar Brain Activity

Study: Sex Addiction and Porn Addiction Trigger Similar Brain Activity

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A new study found that pornography triggers the same brain activity in individuals with so-called “sex addicts” as drugs do in the brains of drug addicts.The study, published in the journal PLOS One, was led by researchers at the University of Cambridge and used functional MRIs to get a glimpse into the brain of 19 men affected by compulsive sexual behavior. Those scans were then compared to the same number of healthy volunteers.Researchers found that three regions of the brain were more active in the sex addicts — the ventral striatum, the dorsal anterior cingulate and the amygdala. Those three regions of the brain are also activated in drug addicts who are shown drug-related stimuli. Researchers say the brain regions are linked to reward, motivation and cravings, as well as processing the significance of emotions and events.Researchers also say that the patients with sex addiction began their exposure to pornography at an earlier age, on average, than the control group.
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Organ Donation Comes Full Circle as Family Pays It Forward

Organ Donation Comes Full Circle as Family Pays It Forward

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) — When the Millard family lost their son, his pancreas was donated to a 19-year-old boy, Jake MacKinnon. Friday, the MacKinnon family will return the favor.After Kalem Millard’s fatal accident, his parents made the difficult decision to donate his pancreas, which ultimately saved the life of Jake MacKinnon.Nearly 10 years later, Bill Millard, Kalem’s father, was in desperate need of a kidney transplant after suffering from diabetes.“This year I was really sick, I could barely walk,” Bill Millard told ABC station affiliate KGO-TV in San Francisco.Jake MacKinnon’s mother, Janice MacKinnon, will donate her kidney to Bill Millard Friday at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco.“Overall, the chance of compatibility is less than fifty percent,” said Dr. Steven Katznelson, making it wonderful news that Janice MacKinnon was a match.The operation will take two to three hours, with Janice MacKinnon going in first and Bill Millard soon after.”The donor usually goes in first and once the kidney comes out, the recipient is ready for the kidney to go in, so we try to minimize the time in between donor-recipient surgeries,” Katznelson said.Bill Millard is thankful to Janice MacKinnon for giving him a chance at a better life.“Having to hook up to my machine every night, to depend on a machine to keep me alive, that’s the hardest thing,” he said, “and the thing that I won’t miss.”Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Study: Women See Other Gals Dressed in Red as Sexual Threat

Study: Women See Other Gals Dressed in Red as Sexual Threat

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — So that lady in red stirs up passion in men — “dancing with me, cheek to cheek…the beauty by my side,” as the Chris DeBurgh song goes. But how does her dress color affect the women around her?
A recent study from the University of Rochester with collaborators from Trnava University in Slovakia and the Slovak Academy of Sciences say not so positively. In fact, it makes them fiercely guard their man.A study, published Friday in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, finds that female onlookers, when shown photos of another woman wearing red, jumped to the conclusion that she would be a sexual threat.In the study, researchers did three experiments, showing female subjects photos of other women dressed in red and in white dresses, and then in red versus green shirts. They hypothesized that the color red would be a “sexual receptivity cue and that this perception would be accompanied by rival derogation and intentions to mate-guard,” according to the study.“We tend to take color for granted,” said the study’s lead author Adam Pazda, a graduate student from the University of Rochester. “It’s not just a pretty thing in our environment that adds to the aesthetic experience in the world. Behind the scenes, it can affect us psychologically in the way we perceive others or ourselves.”“It helps us make sense of other people’s behavior when women are out in red and they are getting the cold shoulder from other women,” he told ABC News. “Maybe they are giving off the perception of a romantic competitor.”Pazda said the study “essentially replicated” a 2008 study on male subjects that found men perceive the color red on a woman to be a “signal of sexual receptivity.”Researchers did the three experiments on several hundred women, using a photo of a woman in a dress that was Photoshopped in white and red, then an image of a woman in a green versus a red shirt. In all photos, the face was blurred out.“Everything was identical, except for the color,” Pazda said.In the first, they asked the study participants, “How interested in sex is she?” and “How seductive is she?” More women said the woman in the red dress was “more open to sexual encounters” than the one in white. They responded along a “sliding scale” from “No, not at all” to “Yes, definitely.”In the second experiment, researchers wanted to see if women would “derogate” or make negative comments about the woman in red.“We asked about two subjects, sexual fidelity and how faithful a woman is, and their financial resources — how much money they had and if they drive a nice car,” Pazda said.Participants again made more derogatory comments toward the woman in the red dress.In the third part of the study, the color was switched from white to green, to rule out perceptions about virginity and purity normally associated with the color white. The woman in the photo was wearing a shirt, not a dress. Researchers also only questioned study participants who were currently involved in romantic relationships.“We asked how likely they would be to introduce their boyfriend, and these women were reluctant to leave a man alone with a woman in a red shirt,” Pazda said.But several women interviewed by ABC News who were not study subjects drew more positive conclusions as to how the color red is perceived.Amy Wolfe, 35, of Berkshire, Massachusetts, says that for her, red suggests “confidence.”Hillary Mains, 32, from Pepperell, Massachusetts, agrees that “red definitely evokes someone who wants to be seen — confidence and pride.”“Va va va voom,” is the phrase that 54-year-old New Yorker Amy Spiegel uses.“There’s lots of science about red as a sexual lure in primates and human beings, which is doubtless where the ‘scarlet’ woman comes from and Bette Davis wearing red as a virgin in Jezebel,” said Peg Streep, an author who writes about psychological research.”In the movie Pretty Woman, they played on that because Julia Roberts is in red when she’s a ‘lady’ at the opera, not a whore,” Streep said.“I think red signals confidence and, yes, the statement ‘I can play this game’ and ‘look at me,’” she said. “The older I get, the more red I wear, meaning ‘don’t count me out!’”But researcher Pazda said the study results can “help us learn about ourselves.”“Men think red is attractive and sexually receptive,” he said. “You might think twice about wearing red to send off the wrong vibes. …If you are wearing red out and about, you might be perceived negatively by other women. It won’t happen in every situation, but be aware of the signals to other women and men that you’re interested in sex.”
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Restaurant Patrons Underestimate Health Threats of Flies

Restaurant Patrons Underestimate Health Threats of Flies

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — We’re all familiar with the well-worn joke that has a restaurant patron complaining to a waiter about a fly in their soup, but a new survey reveals a majority of people — 61 percent — would continue eating their m…

Study Finds Life on a Dairy Farm May Help Prevent Allergies

Study Finds Life on a Dairy Farm May Help Prevent Allergies

iStock/Thinkstock(GOTHENBURG, Sweden) — Want to reduce the risk of your child developing allergies?  Move to a dairy farm.Researchers at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden say children who live on farms that produce milk run one-tenth the risk of developing allergies compared to other rural children.Heath experts say there’s been a dramatic increase in the occurrence of allergic diseases in Western societies in recent years, and one often-cited reason is that children are less exposed to microorganisms and have fewer infections than previous generations.  As a result, that delays maturation of their immune system.The researchers monitored children until the age of three to track the maturation of their immune system in relation to allergic disease. All of the children lived in rural areas in Sweden, with half of them on farms that produced milk. The study found that kids being raised on dairy farms ran a much lower risk of developing allergies than the other children.“Our study also demonstrated for the first time that delayed maturation of the immune system, specifically B-cells, is a risk factor for development of allergies,” says Anna-Carin Lundell, one of the researchers.The study found children with an allergic disease between the ages of 18 and 36 months had a higher percentage of immature B-cells in their blood circulation at birth and during the first month of life.The researchers suggest that pregnant women may also benefit from spending time on dairy farms to promote maturation of the fetal and neonatal immune system.Lundell says they will now try to identify the specific factors on daily farms that strengthen protection against allergies.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

First Ever Dengue Vaccine Shows Signs of Efficacy

First Ever Dengue Vaccine Shows Signs of Efficacy

moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A new vaccine to help prevent dengue infections is showing promise, researchers say, in limiting infections of the disease that strikes nearly 100 million people per year.The study, published in the journal The Lancet, showed that slightly more than half of the children between the ages of two and 14 included in the study were effectively protected from dengue. Approximately 10,275 children were included in the study, all from Southeast Asia.The vaccine was given as a three-part series, on the day of the child’s birth, at six months, and at 12 months. Children who received the vaccine did not suffer from any more adverse events than those who received placebo injections.
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Researchers Use Microchip-Based Device to Culture Certain Types of Breast Cancer Cells

Researchers Use Microchip-Based Device to Culture Certain Types of Breast Cancer Cells

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A preliminary study at Massachusetts General Hospital found that specially developed microchips may be able to detect certain types of breast cancer cells in a patient’s bloodstream.The study contained data from just 36 patients, but researchers were able to detect breast cancer without a biopsy. Still, specific breast cancer cells were detected in just six cases, women with advanced breast cancer.Techniques for culturing the cancer cells in the bloodstream must be improve before the microchip-based technique is ready for clinical use. Still, the use of microchips to find circulating tumor cells would be a big step forward from requiring a biopsy.The microchip would not rely on previously identified marker proteins on the surface of the tumor cells, which limits the existing methods. It also allows researchers to uncover new possible mutations.
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Split Liver Transplants May Be as Safe as Whole Organ Transplants

Split Liver Transplants May Be as Safe as Whole Organ Transplants

Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A new study shows that doctors may be able to increase availability of donated livers by splitting the donated organs into two and giving each half to a different recipient.The study, published in the American Journal of Transplantation, showed that splitting the donated livers may be just as safe as a single whole liver donation. Such a finding would allow doctors to double the number of individuals who could receive liver transplants –  which is important since 16,000 Americans are on the waiting list for a new liver.Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic compared 48 split-liver transplants to 121 matched whole-liver transplants over a span of nine years and found no discernible difference in survival rate of the transplanted organs. The study did note that patients receiving a split transplant did have a higher rate of complications, with some requiring further procedures and potentially surgery. The split transplant is also more difficult, researchers say. Still, with thousands waiting, some in vain, for a donor liver, researchers continue searching for a safe way to increase the number of transplants available.
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Girl ‘Cured’ of HIV at Birth Now Has Virus

Girl ‘Cured’ of HIV at Birth Now Has Virus

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A girl believed to be “cured” of HIV at birth now has detectable levels of the virus, health officials said on Thursday.The unnamed girl, dubbed the “Mississippi baby” after being born to an HIV-positive mother in 2010 and quickly treated with an intense dose of antiretroviral medication, showed no signs of the virus for roughly four years, according to the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease. But a recent round of tests revealed detectable levels of HIV in her blood as well as antibodies to the virus and a decreased T-cell count — all signs of the infection.“Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,” NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci said in a statement. “Scientifically, this development reminds us that we still have much more to learn about the intricacies of HIV infection and where the virus hides in the body.”The case of the Mississippi baby made headlines across the globe after being published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Hannah Gay, the University of Mississippi Medical Center pediatrician who treated the infant at birth, was listed as one of Time magazine’s most influential people of 2013.Gay’s decision to give the newborn antiretroviral medication in the days before it was confirmed that she was in fact HIV-positive was controversial, since there was only a 25 percent chance that the girl would contract the virus from her mother.The girl continued treatment for 18 months before her mother stopped taking her to her clinic appointments. Five months later, when she went back for a check-up, she surprised doctors with undetectable levels of the virus.At first, Gay and her colleagues said the baby had been “functionally cured” of the virus, but later revised their language to “remission” to better convey that there was a chance the virus could rebound, they said at the time.Although the girl’s positive test results have been described as a disappointment, experts say her case still shows tremendous progress in treating the virus that causes AIDS.“The fact that this child was able to remain off antiretroviral treatment for two years and maintain quiescent virus for that length of time is unprecedented,” Dr. Deborah Persaud, professor of infectious diseases at the John Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore, said in a statement released by NIAID. “Typically, when treatment is stopped, HIV levels rebound within weeks, not years.”Persaud is one of the two pediatric HIV experts involved in the ongoing analysis of the case. NIAID and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development announced on Thursday that they would provide funding to analyze the unique case and will take the new findings into account during a new clinical trial.
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Defense Department Seeks Brain Implant to Restore Memory

Defense Department Seeks Brain Implant to Restore Memory

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Defense Department has backed a multi-million dollar program that hopes to develop a brain implant that will help retrieve memories.Researchers believe the device would be able to help members of the military with traumatic brain injuries and possibly help others with Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy.”TBIs don’t just occur in the battlefield, though a lot of them do. Everyday there are people who suffer TBIs from car accidents and suffer repetitive concussions like our players in the NFL and even in high school teams, so the audience is pretty large,” lead researcher Satinderpall Pannu told ABC News.The research is working towards developing a device that could be surgically implanted into the user’s brain so that it is able to stimulate neurons that will help retrieve certain memories.”Research has shown that by stimulating certain neurons, they will spontaneously produce memories,” Pannu said.Pannu and his team at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California have been working on this class of device for more than 10 years, but now they have teamed up with labs at both UCLA and the University of Pennsylvania to complete this device in the next four years.UCLA will be awarded $22.5 million, UPenn will receive $15 million and LLNL will get $2.5 million over the course of the project from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.”Anyone who has witnessed the effects of memory loss in another person knows its toll and how few options are available to treat it. We’re going to apply the knowledge and understanding gained in RAM to develop new options for treatment through technology,” DARPA project manager Justin Sanchez said in a statement Wednesday.Pannu explained that the device will be about the size of a watch battery and will be implanted underneath the user’s skin but above their skull to avoid causing undue pressure on the brain.The device will be attached to two small “spaghetti-like” wires that will go into the user’s brain through the skull so that electrodes that are attached to either end of the wires will touch two parts of the user’s brain that control memory.The neural device will then be able to stimulate neurons in the brain, which will stir memories.Once completed, the project will be tested on a group of patients with Alzheimer’s, dementia and TBI.
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Boy with Brain Cancer Becomes Sheriff Deputy

Boy with Brain Cancer Becomes Sheriff Deputy

Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health (INDIANAPOLIS) — A young boy battling brain cancer has been named the “nation’s youngest special sheriff deputy” in Huntington County, Indiana.Wyatt Schmaltz, a 3-year-old with stage 4 neuroblastoma, was dubbed “Deputy Wyatt” by County Sheriff Terry Stoffehel in a ceremony Wednesday.”We have given Wyatt all the powers of a real Sheriff Deputy, which are to carry out the orders of the Sheriff,” Stoffehel said in a statement. “Right now, his only orders are to get better.”Stoffehel said the sheriff’s department had planned to host Wyatt at a local camp run by different law enforcement personnel, but changed their plans after Wyatt returned to the hospital with an infection.Instead, the department cut a uniform shirt down to Wyatt’s size and gave him a special certificate. Stoffehel even had the boy recite the same oath that all other deputies take when they’re sworn in.“We put it all together,” Stoffehel said. “He was just overwhelmed. It took a while for everything absorb in. He was just floored.”Wyatt is fighting to survive stage 4 neuroblastoma, a form of brain cancer that most commonly affects children 5 years old and younger, according to the Mayo Clinic. He was diagnosed in April and has already undergone several rounds of chemotherapy at the Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, according to a hospital statement.Wyatt’s mother, April Schmaltz, said her son was most excited about the police badge, since he often “arrests” his older brothers when they play at home.”It’s very touching that they would all do this for him,” she said of the gesture. “When he sees all the support, it makes him stronger.”Wyatt used his new badge today, and told a nurse tasked with taking his blood that she was “under arrest,” Schmaltz said.Although Schmaltz expects Wyatt to be released from the hospital on Friday, the young new deputy faces more complicated treatments, including surgery to remove a tumor in his abdomen and stem cell treatments, she said.Dr. Michele Saysana, a pediatrician with Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, said the badge could help Wyatt through the healing process.”It brought tears to our team member’s eyes to see officers who are sworn to protect and serve travel to pay tribute to one of our patients,” she said in a statement.Wyatt got his own badge and uniform as part of his new position, but evidently that wasn’t quite enough. After being given his new gifts, Wyatt turned to the sheriff and deputy and said, “What’s next?”
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The Secret to Being Happier: Quitting Facebook for 99 Days?

The Secret to Being Happier: Quitting Facebook for 99 Days?

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A campaign called “99 Days of Freedom” is daring Facebook users to take a summer detox from the addictive social network.However, not everyone has what it takes to go three months without logging on to check their newsfeed for friends’ selfies, relationship updates and vacation snaps.The campaign, which launched earlier this week, has so far encouraged just more than 2,800 of Facebook’s one billion active users to take a vow of abstinence.The initiative comes as a response to Facebook’s “mood experiment” on 700,000 users, said Merijn Straathof, the art director at Just, the Netherlands-based creative agency behind the “99 Days of Freedom” idea.”Facebook is an incredible platform, we’re all fiercely loyal users and we believe that there’s a lot to love about the service,” he said. “But we we also feel that there are obvious emotional benefits to moderation.””Our prediction is that the experiment will yield a lot of positive personal experiences and, 99 days from now, we’ll know whether that theory has legs,” he added.If the average user spends 17 minutes per day on Facebook and completes the challenge, they will have an extra “28 hours of freedom” to pursue other activities, Straathof said.While it’s still early in the challenge, Straathof said participants have reported a “rough” day one, while others have said they’re much happier spending the extra time reading or going outside.”Day 1 is the roughest. I am always looking for my app when I deleted it. I feel empowered to keep doing this though. I know I can stay strong!” a user named Henderson Cunningham wrote.A man named Kurt wrote he was using his Facebook hiatus as motivation to work out more. “I’m heading back to the gym and getting more exercise with my ‘re-captured’ time,” he wrote.
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New Concern About Testing Procedures for ADHD Medications

New Concern About Testing Procedures for ADHD Medications

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — A new study is raising concern that medications being used to treat children with ADHD may not have gone through the rigorous testing that’s performed on other drugs.Eleven percent of children in the U.S. between the ages of four and 17 — some 6.4 million children in all — have been diagnosed with ADHD, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and many of them receive drugs to help them manage the condition.In a study published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital reviewed clinical trials on all 20 ADHD medications available for use in the U.S. and found that only 32 trials were done before the medications were approved.  The researchers found that 11 of the drugs were approved after clinical trials that involved an average of just 75 people.The study also found the time span between drug trial and approval was just four weeks.  Only three of the drugs were assessed in long-term safety trials.The authors say clinical trials for ADHD medications are designed to prove short-term efficacy only, not long-term safety and efficacy.  The authors also note that while some studies conducted after the drugs are approved help provide additional data, more needs to be done to ensure proper trials are conducted.Medical observers note that when it comes to testing of drugs for use in non-life-threatening conditions, commonly accepted guidelines state 300 to 600 patients should be treated for at least six months, and at least 100 patients should be exposed to a drug for 12 months before it is approved.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

North Dakota Ranks First in Beer Consumption

North Dakota Ranks First in Beer Consumption

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Congratulations, North Dakota.  You lead the nation in beer consumption.According to a study from Beer Marketer’s Insights, a brewing industry trade publisher, North Dakota residents consumed 43.3 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult in 2013, the most of any state.In comparison, folks in Utah consumed the least amount of beer in the U.S., just 19.6 gallons per legal-age adult.Overall, beer consumption in the U.S. dropped slightly from 28.3 gallons per drinking-age adult in 2012 to 27.6 gallons last year.Here are the top five states for beer consumption:

North Dakota, per capita consumption: 43.3 gallons
New Hampshire, per capita consumption: 42.2 gallons
Montana, per capita consumption: 40.5 gallons
South Dakota, per capita consumption: 38.1 gallons
Vermont, per capita consumption: 35.9 gallons

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Gender Bias in Heart Transplants?

Gender Bias in Heart Transplants?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Today’s “Men versus Women” story comes from the world of medicine.
A new study indicates women in the U.S. have a higher chance of dying while awaiting a heart transplant than men, and part of the reason may be unfairness in the heart allocation system.The study published in the journal JACC: Heart Failure looked at more than 28,000 adults on the waiting list for donor hearts from 2000-2010, and ranked the patients according to their health when they were added to the list.Patients were ranked in three categories: 1A for most urgent in need of a transplant; 1B for those slightly more stable; and Class 2 for the most healthy.The study found that women ranked 1A had worse chances of survival compared to men because they were less likely to receive a heart transplant.Why?  The authors believe women may be less likely than men to be “bridged” with a ventricular assist device known as a VAD machine or an artificial heart until a transplant was available.  The authors note that there was no information available to indicate why this is the case.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Researchers Link Climbing Obesity Rate to Lack of Exercise

Researchers Link Climbing Obesity Rate to Lack of Exercise

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) — Researchers at the Stanford University Medical Center say that the surge in the American obesity rate is linked to a lack of exercise, not a dramatic change in the overall number of calories consumed.The study was conducted using data from national health surveys from 1988 through 2010, and led researchers to link “huge increases in both obesity and inactivity.” Data was culled from 17,430 survey participants between 1988 and 1994 and 5,000 each year between 1995 and 2010. Each participant was asked to record the frequency, duration and intensity of their exercise over the last month. Researchers defined “ideal” exercise as over 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or over 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise.The study only found a link between lack of activity and obesity, not a causation.In 1988, just 19 percent of women and 11 percent of men reported no physical activity — figures that climbed to 52 percent and 43 percent respectively by 2010. During that same time, obesity rates climbed from 25 percent among women and 20 percent in men to 35 percent in both women and men.
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Delaware Dad Delivers Early Bundle of Joy on Busy Highway

Delaware Dad Delivers Early Bundle of Joy on Busy Highway

Creatas/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A Delaware woman is recovering after her newborn daughter arrived slightly earlier than expected.Joe and Melissa Alan were on their way to the hospital with Melissa  in labor, when the expectant mom realized they weren’t going to make it to the birthing center.“It hit fast, it came fast and we did not have any time to get up there,” Melissa Alan told ABC News affiliate WPVI-TV in Philadelphia.The couple was attempting an hour drive from their home to their planned birthing center but their daughter had other plans.“Forty minutes down the road I told him to stop. We had to deliver there,” Melissa told WPVI-TV. “I knew I was giving birth in my car.”Fortunately, Joe Alan managed to stay relatively calm during the whole ordeal. After helping his wife into the back seat so she could safely deliver the baby, he called 911.“I saw [my daughter's] head and that’s when it hit me, ‘We’re having a baby,’” Joe told WPVI, who said the 911 operator was able to walk him through the delivery process. “I was yelling, ‘We’re having a baby on the side of Route 1.’”In spite of the drama, Bayleigh Kait was delivered safely just a minute after the couple pulled over. Both mother and daughter are doing fine, although the couple’s car might need a little help.On Joe Alan’s Facebook page, the new father asked “So …. Who knows a good vehicle interior detailer?”
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Can World Cup Heartbreak Affect Your Health?

Can World Cup Heartbreak Affect Your Health?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — As Brazilian fans start to recover from their devastating loss to Germany in the World Cup semifinals, experts say that heartbroken fans should be sure to take care of themselves as losing can come at a cost greater than national pride.A 2013 study published in Psychological Science journal found that fans were more likely to eat high fat and high calorie meals after their team lost an important game. Researchers looked at the eating habits of 726 people in cities with National Football League teams.In cities where a team lost, fans consoled themselves by eating 10 percent more calories than a normal Monday and 16 percent more saturated fat, according to The Telegraph.A similar study by the same authors conducted a study with 78 French sports fans and found when fans — especially soccer fans — wrote about a game their favorite team had lost, they ended up reaching for comfort food.While experts have long known that people can overeat when they’re emotional, it wasn’t clear if simply losing the big game would qualify.According to the study’s lead author and Ph.D candidate in marketing at the INSTEAD business school in Paris, Yann Cornil, the researchers were surprised with how clear the findings were.“The research was usually done in a lab in which people watch sad movies and we look at how much we eat,” said lead author Yann Cornil. “It’s not very realistic. We were not sure in collecting real world data would replicate the results.”But binging after a loss isn’t the only way a game can affect the health of devoted fans. Yann pointed out a 2011 study that examined traffic patterns after college and basketball games and found that nerve-rattling, close games could result in a rise in fatalities by as much as 133 percent.Dr. Todd Peters, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Vanderbilt Medical Center, said the biggest fans will often strongly identify with a team and this can be even more pronounced during international competitions where a sense of national pride also unifies fans.“There’s the associating with the players, but also saying ‘This is us against the world,’ in the competition,” said Peters. “People will identify with certain player attributes or identity of a team…it’s that key piece that does bring up the level of emotions you see in defeat.”Peters said it might just be game, but that fans can experience the same emotional devastation as going through a break-up, including depression and anger.“When there is a loss it is almost like a break-up,” said Peters. “The team can no longer go on. You have to wait another four years to experience it again.”
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