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New Treatment Promises to Regrow Thinning Hair Without Surgery, Drugs

New Treatment Promises to Regrow Thinning Hair Without Surgery, Drugs

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A new hair-loss treatment is giving hope to millions of people with thinning hair.The treatment, called Platelet Rich Plasma therapy -- or PRP -- could help regrow and thicken hair without surgery, drugs or expensive treatments, experts say.PRP relies on the patient's own platelets. The patient's blood is drawn and placed in a machine, where the plasma is separated from the blood and injected directly into that patient's scalp.The platelets contain growth factors that stimulate the regrowth and thickening of hair follicles.The research is preliminary, but it's promising, experts say."This is the best kept secret in the world," Dr. Jeffrey Rapaport, a New Jersey dermatologist, told ABC News.Tanisha Jimenez has used PRP and she says it has worked for her. She said that years of pulling her hair back caused her to lose some around her face. Just weeks after her first treatment, her hair started to regrow, she said."It's amazing," she said.Rapaport noted, though, that this isn't considered a cure for baldness."It's a treatment…What we're doing is increasing the diameter of the size of the hair follicle," he said. "And we're keeping the hairs that would stop growing in the growing phase."The best candidate for PRP is someone who has recently started losing hair, Rapaport said. It won’t work for those who are completely bald, and it won’t regrow all the lost hair, he said.The entire process, including the injection, takes about 90 minutes and costs $400 or more per session.Rapaport recommends one treatment per month for the first four months and then two maintenance treatments per year. Some doctors add other hair-growth medications to the mix.

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‘Miracle’ Woman Survives After 45 Minutes Without Pulse

‘Miracle’ Woman Survives After 45 Minutes Without Pulse

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Doctors glanced up at the monitors to call the time of death for a patient whose heart hadn't beat in 45 minutes and who hadn't breathed in three hours.Then, they saw it: a blip on the screen.Ruby Graupera-Cassimiro was alive."She spontaneously resuscitated," Boca Raton Regional Hospital spokesman Thomas Chakurda told ABC News. "We had brought the family in. We had announced to them that we had done all we could."Graupera-Cassimiro, 40, had gone to the hospital for a cesarean section on Sept. 23. The surgery was uneventful and the baby was healthy, but Graupera-Cassimiro started to experience shortness of breath and doctors had to call a code when she stopped breathing. They tried for three hours to revive her but it was no use. She had no pulse for 45 minutes. Then, her heart started beating again on its own.Doctors think she had a rare condition called an amniotic fluid embolism, which is what happens when the amniotic fluid leaks into the blood stream, causes blood clots and leads to cardiac arrest, according to Mayo Clinic."It's normally diagnosed post mortem," Chakurda said.He said "extraordinary" doesn't begin to describe what happened. The hospital staff is calling Graupera-Cassimiro's survival a "miracle." Despite having no pulse for 45 minutes, she had no neurological damage, no bruises from the chest compressions, and no burn marks from the paddles.Afterward, Graupera-Cassimiro told her sister that she saw their deceased father and he told her she needed to come back, Chakurda said."In a follow-up with one of the physicians, she looked him dead in the eye and said, 'You don't have to be afraid of dying,'" he said."I've never seen a group of people so impacted, if you will, by what they saw," Chakurda added. "They all were very struck."Amniotic fluid embolisms aren't well understood, according to Mayo Clinic."It's likely that amniotic fluid contains components that cause an inflammatory reaction and activate clotting in the mother's lungs and blood vessels," according to Mayo Clinic's website.They can lead to brain damage or even brain death."It's estimated that amniotic fluid embolisms cause up to 10 percent of maternal deaths in developed countries," according to Mayo Clinic. "Death can occur within an hour of the start of symptoms."The rare complication occurs in 1 in 15,200 deliveries in North America, according to the Amniotic Fluid Embolism Foundation.

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Life After Death Question Shows New Life

Life After Death Question Shows New Life

iStock/Thinkstock(SOUTHAMPTON, England) — Researchers at the University of Southampton in England may have answered mankind's greatest question, Is there life after death?Or at the very least, the AWARE (AWAreness during REsuscitation) study, the largest of its kind, suggests that something akin to life occurs when brain functions stop temporarily.In reviewing the cases of more than 2,000 patient from hospitals in the U.S, the United Kingdom and Austria, lead author Dr. Sam Parnia maintains, "Contrary to perception, death is not a specific moment but a potentially reversible process that occurs after any severe illness or accident causes the heart, lungs and brain to cease functioning."Of the 330 patients who survived cardiac arrest, about four in 10 said they experienced some awareness after their heart stopped but of those, half admitted not being able to remember what is normally reported as an out-of-body or near-death experience.In one particular instance, however, a man spoke of observing his resuscitation that included hearing two beeps at three-minute intervals.Parnia said that was significant because besides having no heartbeat for three minutes, the brain stops functioning 20 to 30 seconds after the heart stops.

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Chewing Ice May Be Linked to Iron Deficiency

Chewing Ice May Be Linked to Iron Deficiency

iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — Some people suffer a condition called pica, meaning they compulsively chew on substances with no nutritional value such as paper.One form of this disorder is pagophagia, which involves chewing ice. However, as a new study points out, when people do this, they may actually be treating their iron deficiency anemia.University of Pennsylvania clinical psychologist Melissa Hunt says that IDA causes fatigue because the body is lacking in oxygen-carrying hemoglobin.Hunt reports that a friend of hers with pagophagia maintains that ice gives her a lift similar to the jolt people get from caffeinated coffee first thing in the morning.On the other hand, people who don't have an iron deficiency won't benefit from chowing down on ice, Hunt says.Catherine Broome, a hematologist with the Georgetown University School of Medicine, notes the study is feasible given that the iron-deficient patients she sees also report chewing ice.

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Alessandra Ambrosio and Adriana Lima Share 7 Easy Fitness Tips

Alessandra Ambrosio and Adriana Lima Share 7 Easy Fitness Tips

Mike Pont/FilmMagic(NEW YORK) — Victoria's Secret models Alessandra Ambrosio and Adriana Lima have to keep their bodies in tip-top shape. However, that doesn't always mean trips to expensive gyms or chef-made healthy meals.Ambrosio and Lima, 33, both of whom will wear jeweled Dream Angels Fantasy bras worth $2 million each in the Dec. 9 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show, shared their quick and easy tips to staying in shape that anybody can do.1. Try to sweat every day: "Even 20 minutes is better than nothing," said Lima, who prefers boxing. Ambrosio, who rotates between yoga, Pilates and spinning, has also taken up running. "I hate running," she admitted, "but it actually feels good if you do it. If you get it done, it feels really amazing."2. Find an activity you can do with your kids: In many cases, working out doesn't just mean hitting the elliptical -- it's possible to involve the family too! Lima said that her two young daughters love to go to the boxing gym with her. "Their favorite thing is to go into the ring and run around," she said.3. Use online workout programs: When she's traveling and can't hit the gym, Ambrosio makes an online appointment with Ballet Beautiful, and a trainer works with her over Skype. Not ready to make that kind of commitment? The service offers videos on YouTube too, as do plenty of other trainers.4. Just taste dessert: The night before Ambrosio appeared on Good Morning America to discuss the new Dream Angels Fantasy bras last week, she ordered a hot fudge sundae. However, she only had three bites. It satisfied her craving for something sweet, but didn't pack on the calories.5. Make easy substitutes for sweet foods: However, some days Ambrosio needs to be stricter than others. Then, she'll substitute frozen yogurt for ice cream. "I put honey and a little bit of granola and some strawberries," she said. More in the mood for a milkshake? Lima swears by vanilla protein shakes.6. ...And salty splurges too: Ambrosio loves French fries, but her favorite healthy substitute is packed with flavor too. "Avocado with a little bit of lemon and salt," she said. "That's what I do as a snack."7. Keep healthy snacks on you: This way, you never get too hungry and you're not tempted to pick up something unhealthy in a pinch. Ambrosio recommends health bars with chia seeds, while Lima snacks on nuts with cranberries to satisfy her sweet tooth.

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Massachusetts Town Considering Ban on All Tobacco Products

Massachusetts Town Considering Ban on All Tobacco Products

iStock/Thinkstock(WESTMINSTER, Mass.) -- A small town in Massachusetts may become the first municipality in the United States to impose a total ban on the sale of tobacco products.In the town of Westminster, Mass., which has a population of 7,700, there is a proposal to enact a total ban on the sale of all tobacco products, from bubble-gum flavored cigars, to e-cigarettes, to a new form of dissolvable tobacco.

Those proposing the tobacco ban say the concern is for children. But, cigarette-maker Philip Morris says the ban is a bad policy that will cost jobs.

The Board of Health will discuss the proposal at a meeting Wednesday night.

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USDA Approves Genetically-Modified Potato

USDA Approves Genetically-Modified Potato

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Geneticists are working with a "super potato" that could mean a future with blemish-free french fries.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is approving the commercial planting of a spud that's genetically modified to resist bruising, and when cooking, produces less of a suspected human carcinogen that's caused cancer in animals.

The potato is developed by the Boise, Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company, which is a major supplier of french fries, hash browns, and other potato products for restaurant chains like McDonald's.

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CDC Orders $2.7 Million in Ebola-Specific Personal Protective Equipment

CDC Orders $2.7 Million in Ebola-Specific Personal Protective Equipment

CDC(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ordered $2.7 million in personal protective equipment to increase the supply available to U.S. hospitals caring for Ebola patients. The CDC said its supply of PPE will be configured into kits that can be delivered quickly to hospitals that need them. Each kit is expected to contain sufficient PPE to "manage the care of one Ebola patient for up to five days.""We are making certain not to disrupt the orders submitted by states and hospitals," Greg Burel, director of th CDC's Division of Strategic National Stockpile said. "But we are building our stocks so that we can assist when needed."Each kit will include impermeable gowns, coveralls and aprons, boot overs, gloves, face shields, hoods, respirators, powered-air purifying respirator systems and disinfecting wipes.

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Why You Might Not Be Allergic to Penicillin After All

Why You Might Not Be Allergic to Penicillin After All

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Afraid penicillin will give you hives? New research says such fears might be unfounded.Two new studies have found some people are mistakenly avoiding penicillin because they believe they are allergic.The studies were presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual scientific meeting this week.The larger study followed 384 people who were going into surgery and believed they were allergic to penicillin. Researchers gave penicillin skin tests to the test subjects and if the results came back negative, they were given immoxicillin.While all believed they would have an allergic reaction to the medication, researchers found the overwhelming majority -- 94 percent -- of test subjects showed no allergy to penicillin.It is important for patients to know if they are actually allergic to the medication because it is such a vital and important class of drug, Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News' chief health and medical editor, said."They’re the front line for strep throat, ear infection, sinus infection," Besser said of penicillin medications. "If you can’t take those, you’re often taking a drug with more side effects that put you at more risk for drug resistance."Besser said one reason so many people believe they have an allergy is because they developed an allergic reaction when they were exposed to the medication at a young age. But people may have since grown out of their allergy, he said. Others may have developed a rash that was due to a virus, but mistakenly attributed to the medication.If you suspect you are not actually allergic to penicillin, Besser says, you should visit an allergist who can safely determine whether you are allergic or not.

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Last Person Completes Ebola Monitoring in Texas

Last Person Completes Ebola Monitoring in Texas

Hemera/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — The final person in Texas being monitored for Ebola has passed the virus' 21-day incubation period, marking the end of the state's Ebola crisis.None of the 177 people who had contact with the state's Ebola patients -- Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, and two of the Dallas nurses who cared for him, Nina Pham and Amber Vinson -- have contracted Ebola, state officials said. The list included health care workers, people who shared the same households as the Ebola patients and other community contacts."Hopefully, Americans will be relieved and fear will be eased," said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News chief health and medical editor. "In Dallas, not even the people who lived with a very sick person with Ebola became ill."Besser said he wasn't surprised by this, considering that Ebola is not especially contagious. It is only spread via contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The final person to come off the monitoring list was a hospital worker who handled medical waste for one of the three Ebola patients, according to state health officials. Everyone on the list underwent twice daily monitoring of temperature for 21 days -- the longest accepted incubation period for the virus."We’re happy to reach this milestone, but our guard stays up," said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. "We reached this point through teamwork and meticulous monitoring, and we’ll continue to be vigilant to protect Texas from Ebola."Ebola cases will continue to arrive in the United States, but they will be rare and they will be contained, Besser said."Our best guarantee of protection here is in doing all we can to help eliminate Ebola from West Africa," he said.

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Craving Food? Tapping Your Head Might Stop It

Craving Food? Tapping Your Head Might Stop ItiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Doing something completely mindless has been shown to stop food cravings.Richard Weil, in charge of weight loss at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital in New York City, says all it might take is tapping your finger to yo...

People Want Their Leaders to Look Healthy

People Want Their Leaders to Look Healthy

iStock/Thinkstock(AMSTERDAM) — Did Republicans do well against Democrats because they looked healthier?Researchers at VU University Amsterdam say that people are naturally drawn to healthy-looking politicians than ones who exude intelligence. The same principle of attraction also applies to potential business leaders.Lead author Brian Spisak had about 150 people observe a pair of photos that showed someone looking more or less healthy or more or less intelligent without telling the participants that each photo was of the same man whose face was digitally altered.In almost seven out of 10 cases when asked to make a choice for a CEO, participants favored the healthy face except in cases when the person would have to run negotiations or find new markets.Spisak says that explains why politicians and captains of industry take extra time with their appearance. In general, the public will choose leaders who are healthy-looking unless it’s for a specific need when intelligence seems to trump looks.

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Young People Notice Calorie Labeling Too

Young People Notice Calorie Labeling Too

iStock/Thinkstock(GLASGOW, Scotland) -- Some of the most important reading college students can do is in the cafeteria.A new study from the United Kingdom says that young people do pay attention to calorie labeling of food when it’s prominently displayed over a period of time. As a result, it helps them to keep weight off.Lead researcher Charoula Konstantia Nikolaou, a PhD student from the University of Glasgow, and her team first set up a calorie information display for just five weeks out of a 36-week academic year in one college dining room.By the end of the year, the average weight-gain of students was just under eight pounds. In the second year, the calorie information was shown for 30 weeks. When that year ended, students reported that their weight stayed constant.Research supervisor Mike Lean said that students during year two reported paying attention to calorie information and ordered healthier meals that wound up containing 18 percent fewer calories.Another benefit: school caterers said their costs on food ingredients were lowered by a third when students made healthier choices.

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Minor Cosmetic Procedures Considered Very Safe

Minor Cosmetic Procedures Considered Very Safe

Digital Vision/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — Minimally invasive cosmetic procedures in the U.S. are more popular than ever although some people may still be hesitant to undergo treatments, fearing possible side effects.However, a study of more than 20,000 procedures suggest the occurrence of bruising, swelling, redness or bumpiness, among other possible complications, happened to under one percent of all patients.Based on the study he conducted, Dr. Murad Alam, a dermatology specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, vouches for the safety of minimally invasive cosmetic procedures involving fillers, neurotoxins and the use of laser and energy devices.The cases he examined were performed by nearly two dozen dermatologists at eight centers in different regions of the country.According to Alam, the procedures “can be mixed and matched to give the individual a significant cosmetic benefit, rather than getting one big cosmetic procedure that might be risky.”He does admit that fillers, such as collagen, carry a slightly higher risk than lasers because they are a bit more invasive.

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Researchers: Many Doctors Don’t Know Correct Answers to Allergy Questions

Researchers: Many Doctors Don’t Know Correct Answers to Allergy Questions

tetmc/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers say that many doctors may not know the best cure for your allergies.According to a study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Meeting, 409 physicians surveyed on a variety of allergy topics did not know the correct answers. Researchers say their questions were not complex or obscure, but focused instead on basic reactions and allergies to different vaccines.Just 50 percent of physicians surveyed knew the correct first treatment for rash and vomiting after ingesting a known food allergen, and only 12 percent knew that the flu shot is safe to give to patients, even if they have an egg allergy.The study will require follow-up to determine whether the findings can be extrapolated to all doctors.

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College Student Sells Car to Invent Inflatable Baby Incubator

College Student Sells Car to Invent Inflatable Baby Incubator

James Dyson Foundation(NEW YORK) -- A recent college graduate has turned a school assignment, originally funded by selling his car, into an award-winning invention with the potential to save lives.James Roberts, 23, was named the International Winner of the James Dyson Award this week for inventing an inflatable baby incubator that could potentially be deployed in areas without medical resources.Roberts was a student at Loughborough University in England when he first become "obsessed" with building an incubator after seeing a documentary on Syria and learning that infants were dying there without medical access.Roberts, who now lives in south London, said initially the project started as an assignment to “design a product that solves a problem," but that he quickly became obsessed with making it work.Roberts said once he started with the project, he spent 18-hour days working on it and sold his car to fund prototypes and his research.“It wasn’t fun,” Roberts said. “Having no weekends and being a zombie.”After nine months of work both developing the prototype and talking to aid agencies and midwives about the needs of prenatal infants, Roberts had a working machine: the MOM incubator.

Roberts' MOM incubator is designed for areas without regular access to medical care. It is collapsible and can be blown up manually. A computer can control the humidity and temperature so that premature infants are protected from cold or dry air.The machine also has a phototherapy unit for jaundiced infants.Roberts said he was looking for investors and partners when he entered the 2014 James Dyson Award contest, which gives up to 45,000 British pounds (about $71,000) for products that “have a significant and practical purpose, are commercially viable, and are designed with sustainability in mind.”When Roberts found out he was a finalist, he said he was mostly excited to meet Dyson himself, a British inventor famous for his bagless vacuum cleaner.“He stuck out his hand and said, ‘Well done, you’ve won,’” Roberts said. “I almost collapsed.”Dyson said the invention had the potential to save thousands. The prize awarded Roberts' team with 45,000 pounds for additional prototyping and another 15,000 pounds (about $23,700) for Loughborough University.“[Roberts'] invention shows the impact design engineering can have on people’s lives," Dyson said in a statement. "The western world takes incubators for granted. We don’t think about how their inefficient design makes them unusable in developing countries and disaster zones.”While Roberts is still looking for investors, he hopes the Dyson award money will allow him to produce his incubator prototype on his own terms so it can reach a wide variety of people across the globe.“My wildest dreams would be in 10 years [meeting someone] who was a kid,” he said, “and was in my incubator and survived.”

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Watch Kids, Adults React Differently to Question About Their Bodies

Watch Kids, Adults React Differently to Question About Their Bodies

Jubilee Project(NEW YORK) -- Kids and adults often want different things in life. Kids, for example, rarely want a new designer handbag. And adults don't generally long for their blankies in the middle of the day.And when it comes to body image -- specifically what kids and adults would change about their bodies -- the answers are astounding."Comfortable," a video posted to YouTube last week, has already had nearly 2.5 million views. It was created by the Jubilee Project, a company that makes short films, PSAs and documentaries "in collaboration with non-profits to increase awareness and inspire action." The video asks 50 people one question: "If you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?""Only one?" one woman laughs. "I would change my forehead," said another. "I have a really big forehead."Face puffiness, baby-rearing stretch marks, big ears and more, the adults tell the camera.And then there's the kids."You know, like have a mermaid tail," one girl responds. Teleportation, responds another. "I want legs like a cheetah so I can run faster like a cheetah," said one little boy. "Wings," said another.And ultimately:"I don't think there's anything to change.""I like my body actually," said the first girl. "Just the mermaid tail."Jubilee executive director Jason Y. Lee said the film is a reminder to us all that "we were each beautifully and uniquely made." We believe we look our best, he said, when we are confident and comfortable in our own skin."As a child," Lee said, "I was convinced that if I ate enough carrots I'd be able to see through walls. As I grew older, X-ray vision was joined by a long list of things I wanted to change about my body: clearer skin, more muscle, slightly taller, etc. That said, I haven't stopped eating carrots. A boy can dream, right?"

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CDC Offers Update on Chikungunya Virus

CDC Offers Update on Chikungunya Virus

Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released an update on the spread of chikungunya, the virus spread to the U.S. from the Caribbean beginning last December.The outbreak has caused an estimated 795,000 cases in 37 countries and territories, the CDC said. At least 1,600 travelers have been reported to have returned to the U.S. with chikungunya. Prior to the recent outbreak, the CDC says just 28 travelers with chikungunya entered the U.S. each year.Approximately nine million people travel between the U.S. and the Caribbean each year, the CDC estimates. Those travelers going to the Caribbean or Central or South America are advised to be aware of the risk this fall and winter, and make sure they use insect repellant."The beginning of fall means that mosquito problems in the continental United States will be decreasing," Dr. Roger Nasci, chief of the CDC's Arboviral Diseases Branch, said. "However, travelers to areas where the chikungunya outbreak continues are at risk of becoming infected."

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Texas Reaches Ebola Monitoring Endpoint

Texas Reaches Ebola Monitoring Endpoint

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- The last person being monitored in connection with the three patients diagnosed with Ebola in Texas will be cleared at the end of the day Friday from twice-daily monitoring.Health officials say the last person being monitored is a hospital worker who handled medical waste on Oct. 17.A total of 177 people have been monitored over 21 days because they had contact with one of the three Ebola patients in the state, specimens, or medical waste.“We’re happy to reach this milestone, but our guard stays up,” said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services in a statement. “We reached this point through teamwork and meticulous monitoring, and we’ll continue to be vigilant to protect Texas from Ebola.”State health officials continue to monitor all air travelers who return to Texas from counties with widespread Ebola outbreaks.The Centers for Disease Control has identified about 50 people who have returned to Texas from those areas.

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Devon Still’s Daughter Gets Ready for Dad’s Big Night

Devon Still’s Daughter Gets Ready for Dad’s Big Night

@Dev_Still71/Twitter(CINCINNATI) -- Leah Still flew from Philadelphia to Cincinnati to see her father play pro football for the first time on Thursday night, but the journey started long before she fastened her seat belt.Leah, the daughter of Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Devon Still, was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer in June when doctors discovered a mass in her abdomen. She's now feeling well enough to leave the hospital in Philadelphia. On Wednesday, she got her nails done before the flight to primp for the big game."She's just excited," Devon Still told ABC News' Cincinnati affiliate WCPO. "She said how she's going to be yelling in the crowd and stuff, so she's been feeling good."Although the Bengals had initially cut Still from the team, they re-signed him to their practice squad to help him keep his health insurance when they learned about Leah's diagnosis.Still was later re-added to the official team roster and will play in Thursday night's home game against the Cleveland Browns.

"Daddy, I'm on a plane," Leah said into a camera in a video message to her father on Wednesday night, which he posted on Instagram. "We have to go on another plane because this plane doesn't go all the way to Cincinnati."Leah then reminded him that he was supposed to pick her up at the airport.Devon Still captioned the video, "All the fame has went to her head. Now all of the sudden she doesn't do layovers she a direct flight type of kid."After the first quarter of the game, Leah is expected to be part of a ceremony in which the team presents a check to Cincinnati Children's Hospital for more than $1 million to go toward pediatric cancer research. The team raised money from sales of Still's jersey, No. 75, which sold out, according to the team's website.

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