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Nurses Confess: Four Insider Secrets That Could Affect You

Nurses Confess: Four Insider Secrets That Could Affect YouCreatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — With the power of life and death sometimes in their very hands, being a nurse can be a high pressure job.Nurses Lauren, Christi and Ro pulled back the hospital curtain and let ABC News’ 20/20 in on the secrets of their profession.“Everything you see on TV is completely wrong,” Lauren, an emergency room nurse, told 20/20. “The E.R. is brutal. We see from the most horrifically, critically ill patients to the patient in the room next-door who’s there for toe pain.”From how they’ve seen difficult patients dealt with to how they deal with the pressure of the job, they offered some helpful hints to prospective patients on how to “survive” a hospital stay.Get an inside look at the high-stress, high-stakes profession below.1. It’s a stressful job, so kindness goes a long way.“It’s a very emotionally, drastic job to have,” Lauren said. “Be nice to us, and we will go above and beyond the regular nursing care that you’re going to get."2. This might be the code word for a rude patient.You’ve probably heard of hospital emergency codes like “code red” and “code blue,” but it turns out there might be another one you’re less familiar with.“I’ve heard ‘PITA’ thrown around,” Ro said. “Pain in the A?”3. They have ways to lighten the mood when an intoxicated patient comes in.The nurses confess they’ll take bets on a drunk person’s alcohol level without using the blood test.“It’s the smell. It’s if they try to spit at you…how accurate are they?” Lauren said.“How close are they getting to you when they’re telling you they’re not drunk,” Ro said.4. Nurses have been caught stealing patients’ medication.“The painkiller abuse among nurses is really a silent epidemic,” author Alexandra Robbins said she learned when interviewing nurses for her book, The Nurses: A Year of Secrets, Drama, and Miracles with the Heroes of the Hospital.The nurses say they are supposed to “waste” medication by discarding leftovers in front of another nurse. But keeping it instead is relatively easy, according to Lauren, who said she’s accidentally taken home medications.“And by the time you think about it, you're emptying your pockets at home,” Lauren said. “I always bring it back the next day. However, addiction is a common problem among hospital staff.”Last January, Ryan Slater had an emergency appendectomy when he had his pain medication swapped with saline solution by a nurse at the hospital. The hospital said this was an isolated incident and that it was taking many steps to eliminate the risk of it happening again. They said the nurse was no longer employed at the hospital. Her nursing license is now revoked.Ro even recalls catching a nurse red-handed diverting medication at one of the previous hospitals where she worked. “She was putting the waste in her soda can and going and medicating the patient,” Ro said."There are ways that nurses can get help without losing their license and without putting patients at risk," Robbins said. "It's really too quiet of an issue, and people need to talk about it more."“For the past 13 years, nurses have held the top spot as the public’s most honest and ethical profession in America in an annual gallop poll,” the American Nurses Association said in a statement to 20/20.Tune in to ABC News' 20/20 on Friday, April 3 at 10 p.m. ET.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Pore-Fection! Seven Ways to Stay Wrinkle-Free, for Free

Pore-Fection! Seven Ways to Stay Wrinkle-Free, for Free iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Americans will try all sorts of ways to get their skin looking as wrinkle-free as possible. There are a plethora of fancy facials that use, among other unique ingredients, lasers, bee venom, and even one’s own blood. In addition to those treatments, there are pricey cosmetic creams, Botox and even face slapping.But you don’t have to spend a lot of money to prevent wrinkles.As part of the Good Morning America Yahoo Your Day series, GMA met up with Michele Promaulayko, Yahoo Health’s editor-in-chief, to get the scoop on how to prevent wrinkles for free. She said that most wrinkles are caused by the breakdown of collagen and elastin, adding: “biggest culprits are obviously smoking and the sun.”Promaulayko also offered the following seven easy tips to prevent wrinkles:1. Avoid drinking through a straw. “When you're pursing your lips a lot with a straw, you're going to get those little lines around your lips. It's not cute,” she said.2. Limit frequent gum chewing. The repetitive motion of chewing, usually more on one side of the mouth, can cause wrinkles to be more pronounced on that side of the face.3. Always wear your sunglasses, even when it's cloudy. "You're always squinting when you're in bright light. And that's going to cause fine lines around your eyes," she noted.4. Try not to stretch your skin when applying or removing makeup. Just try to be gentle with your skin,” she said. “Also we have a tendency to…raise our eyebrows and open our mouth and make all these funny faces. Try not to do that."5. Limit consumption of refined sugar. “It does nothing good. It breaks down your cells,” she said, adding that it causes inflammation.6. Be aware of how much you’re looking down at your mobile devices. “You can use voice texting…holding your phone up and not looking down,” she said.7. Try not to sleep on your side. “When you sleep on your side, you cause wrinkles on your face, but you also cause cleavage wrinkles,” she said. She advised that people sleep on their backs and use silky pillowcases. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

If You Can’t Quit TV at Least Quit Sitting

If You Can’t Quit TV at Least Quit Sitting iStock/Thinkstock(PITTSBURGH) — Remember when the worst thing that could happen to you from watching too much TV is that your brain would turn to mush? Well, now it’s a lot more serious than that. Andrea Kriska, an epidemiologist at the University of Pittsburgh, says that people put themselves at greater risk of contracting diabetes from chronic TV viewing.How bad does it get? Kriska says the risk goes up by 3.4 percent for every hour you sit in front of the tube.Of course, it’s not the appliance itself that’s the threat -- it’s all that sitting, which can also apply to the computer or at work.And here’s what makes it really scary: any amount of exercise you do won’t counteract the risk of diabetes as long as you spend hour after hour on your backside.Studies seems to confirm these results but it’s not a hopeless cause if people are really serious of avoiding diabetes and all the health issues that go with it.According to Kriska, “It is likely that a lifestyle intervention program that incorporates a specific goal of decreasing sitting time would result in greater changes in sitting and likely more health improvements than are demonstrated here.”Your goals: exercise regularly, try to lose some weight and if you’re going to watch TV, try to do more of it standing up.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Creative Thoughts Spring from Tired Minds

Creative Thoughts Spring from Tired MindsiStock/Thinkstock(ALBION, Mich.) — Ever been so tired, you felt like you couldn't think straight?Get that thought out of your head right now because it turns out that feeling a little sleepy and disoriented might result in some very creative and interesting ideas.Robert Friedman, who wrote the book The Best Place to Work, says that fatigue puts people in less control of their thoughts, and as a result, this frees up the mind for creativity.In a study conducted at Albion University in Michigan, 400 students were given insight-based and analytical problems to solve at various times of the day. The outcome was that the students were more successful at insight-based questions when they felt more tired.As a result, Friedman suggests that when it comes to any kind of creative task, work on it either where you’re still feeling a bit groggy after waking up or perhaps late in the day when you’ve already put in a full day’s work.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sweat Never Smelled So Good

Sweat Never Smelled So GoodiStock/Thinkstock(BELFAST, Northern Ireland) — For the sake of staying fit, people will put up with a lot, including the often pungent odor of perspiration that wafts through the gym.Since sweating is part of the routine and there’s really no way to stop it, Nimal Gunaratne and researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have developed an ionic liquid that can be sprayed on like a scent before a workout, turning perspiration into something that is pleasing to the senses.Gunaratne explains that when the liquid comes in contact from the water from sweat, it produces a sweet-smelling fragrance. Even better, the compounds in perspiration that cause that sweaty stink are neutralized by the ionic liquid.The next step in the process is already underway with a perfume development company working with Gunaratne and his team to produce one or two products that will be available commercially.Until then, try not to let them see you sweat.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Preliminary Study May Be Small Step Towards Immune-Based Cancer Treatment

Preliminary Study May Be Small Step Towards Immune-Based Cancer Treatment shironosov/itock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A preliminary medical study may represent the first step towards training the body's immune system to recognize and fight cancer cells.The study, published Thursday in the journal Science Express, involves three case reports where researchers created tailor-made cancer vaccines based on melanoma tumors removed from the specific patients. The researchers found that when the vaccine was administered, the patients saw a strong immune response, particularly an increase in cancer-fighting T-cells.The study is extremely preliminary, as the data was not compared to patients receiving a placebo, and the number of patients looked at is very small. Still, researchers hope that it could be a small step towards a larger trial. "This proof-of-principal study shows that these custom-designed vaccines can elicit a very strong immune response," one of the study's authors, Dr. Gerald Linette, a medical oncologist at Washington University, said. "We still have much more work to do, but this is an important first step and opens the door to personalized immune-based cancer treatments." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

CDC: Multi-Drug-Resistant Intestinal Bacteria Spreading

CDC: Multi-Drug-Resistant Intestinal Bacteria Spreading Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday released a report on multi-drug-resistant intestinal illness that has been brought to the U.S. by international travelers.The shigella sonnei bacteria, which is resistant to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, has sickened 243 people in 32 states in Puerto Rico between May 2014 and February 2015. Shigellosis can spread quickly in groups such as children in childcare facilities, homeless people, and gay and bisexual men, the CDC says. Ciprofloxacin is the first choice to treat the disease among adults."These outbreaks show a troubling trend in Shigella infections in the United States," said CDC Director Tom Frieden. "Drug-resistant infections are harder to treat and because Shigella spreads so easily between people, the potential for more -- and larger -- outbreaks is a concern."Anna Bowen, a medical officer in the CDC's Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, said in a statement that "washing your hands with soap and water is important for everyone."The CDC says that Shigella causes about 500,000 cases of diarrhea in the U.S. each year and is spread through contaminated food and recreational water. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Scientists Reveal Real ‘Paleo’ Diet of Ancient Skeleton

Scientists Reveal Real ‘Paleo’ Diet of Ancient Skeleton Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution(NEW YORK) -- Researchers studying the bones of an ancient skeleton in Washington state have uncovered an interesting twist to the man's original "paleo" diet.Scientists have been examining the mysterious Kennewick skeleton since it was found near that city in 1996. The skeleton dates back 9,000 years and appears to be of a different ethnicity than other indigenous people, according to Henry Schwarcz, a geochemist and professor emeritus at the School of Geography and Earth Sciences at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.Schwarcz, who studies the diets of ancient people by analyzing isotopes in bones, said he was amazed after analyzing the collagen in the bones of Kennewick man in an effort to identify his "paleo" diet."This guy was apparently living on a diet almost exclusively of marine foods; foods that come from the ocean," Schwarcz said.The results are surprising because the man was found 350 miles inland along the Columbia River near plains that were teeming with terrestrial wildlife. While he could have been subsisting on salmon swimming upstream, he was likely not venturing to hunt in the fields."He was choosing not to eat that wildlife," Schwarcz said.The geochemist explained that the Kennewick man may have "had a prejudice against eating footed creatures. That’s not really something that we [see.]"Kennewick said it's unclear why he didn't try to branch out and eat other wildlife in the area.The time period for the Kennewick skeleton is just under the timeline cited by followers of the "paleo" diet, who aim to eat the same way people ate 10,000 to 2.5 million years before agriculture took hold.Ken Sayers, an anthropologist at Georgia State University in Atlanta and one of the lead authors of the recent Quarterly Review of Biology of how ancient people ate, said there is little evidence to suggest early humans subsisted on a specialized diet.“Whatever angle you chose to look at the diets of our early ancestors, it’s hard to pinpoint any one particular feeding strategy,” Sayers said. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

World Autism Awareness Day 2015: Light It Up Blue

World Autism Awareness Day 2015: Light It Up Blue Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Being a little blue never felt so good. You may have noticed there are a lot of people out there wearing blue today and tweeting selfies with the hashtag #LIUB for "light it up blue."Thursday is World Autism Awareness Day, and even global landmarks like the Empire State Building and the Prince's Palace of Monaco are celebrating with special blue lights for the occasion. The United Nations declared April 2 World Autism Awareness Day in 2007, and we've been celebrating it ever since.Autism is a developmental disability that usually manifests around the third year of life, according to the U.N. Symptoms vary widely across the spectrum but generally include engaging in repetitive behaviors, and having difficulties with communication and social interactions.It affects all ethnic, racial and socioeconomic groups, according to the U.N.One in 68 children born in the United States is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which released findings based on 2010 surveillance data.Parents are often the first to notice the symptoms, such as when a child doesn't make eye contact, according to the nonprofit Autism Speaks. Concerned parents shouldn't panic, but they should have a talk with their family pediatrician, experts say. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Necessity of Fish Oil Supplements Debated

Necessity of Fish Oil Supplements DebatediStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Fish oil is a dietary supplement first touted for its heart benefits and now used for everything from healing dry eyes to strengthening hair and nails to enhancing one’s mood.“Fish oil is a supplement that contains omega 3-fatty acids from fish,” said Michele Promaulayko, editor-in-chief of Yahoo Health. “It has long been thought to have protective elements for your heart, for stroke and cardiovascular disease.”“Some people take it for its beauty benefits,” she added.Though the popular supplement is mostly used to protect heart health, a recent article in the New York Times pointed out that most clinical trials of fish oil have not shown it to lower the risks of heart attack and stroke.“From 2005 to 2012, at least two dozen rigorous studies of fish oil were published in leading medical journals…All but two of these studies found that compared with a placebo, fish oil showed no benefit,” the newspaper reported in a March 30 article.The Consumer Healthcare Products Association, a trade association, countered those findings in a statement to ABC News, saying, “There is a strong body of evidence that supports the benefits of supplements such as fish oil in several areas.”ABC News' Chief Health and Medical Editor, Dr. Richard Besser, says that the "jury is still out" on whether fish oil supplements really work."There are some studies that show that they do and there are some studies that show that the don’t," Besser said Thursday on ABC's Good Morning America. "They lower your triglycerides, which are a fat that is linked to heart disease, but the studies don’t seem to show that it prevents heart attacks or saves lives from that."Besser attributes fish oil supplements' popularity to an observation made among Eskimos in Greenland in the 1980s."They found that Eskimos in Greenland had very low rates of heart disease and when they looked at what they ate, they ate a lot of fish...that are high in Omega-3 fatty acids," Besser said. "So they figured, well, maybe this will prevent heart attacks.""So they did a study [and] the first study showed some benefits but other studies haven’t showed those benefits," he said. "Another question is, if you take the Omega-3s out of the fish and just take them as a supplement, do you still get that same benefit?"Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

How 3-D Facial Scans Might Uncover Hidden Signs of Aging

How 3-D Facial Scans Might Uncover Hidden Signs of Aging Cell Research Journal/ Jing-Dong J Han/Weiyang Che(NEW YORK) -- Researchers are hoping 3-D scans can shed new light on signs of aging.Researchers from the Fudan University in Shanghai are investigating if 3-D scans can find hidden signs of aging and potentially develop an app that will allow doctors to identify patients at high risk for deadly health complications as they grow old.In a new study published in Cell Research Journal, the team scanned the faces of 300 people to create a “comprehensive map” of the human face while it ages. The "map" consisted of a series of male and female faces during five different age groups between 17 to 77.Researchers then combed through 3-D images of participants to identify slow agers or people who look younger than their age, well-predicted agers or people who look their age, and fast agers, or people who look older than their years.The team’s goal is to find a way for doctors to find people with “older” faces and identify if they’re also at higher risk for complications from poor health.Researchers also looked at biomarkers connected to age in the blood including cholesterol and albumin to see if those signs corresponded with the “age” of the person’s face. Researchers found some correlation, but it did not correspond as high as other proven biomarkers that help researchers identify age.However with more study and work, the team hopes to fine tune their algorithm so that health officials can easily find trouble signs just by looking at a person’s face."We will package our predictor into a downloadable app, and doctors will be able to use it provided they can upload a 3-D image of their patient into it," Jing-Dong Han of Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences told the New Scientist website.Steve Horvath, a biostatistician and bioinformatician at University of California Los Angeles’ David Geffen School of Medicine, has done multiple studies identifying biomarkers for the aging process by looking at the DNA of blood and tissues.“I love the idea. I think it’s very intuitive,” Horvath told ABC News of the study. “Most people are very good at judging another person’s age just by looking at their face. [This study] makes it more rigorous by using pattern recognition algorithm.”Horvath, however, says the study is just a very early step and needs to be proven in follow-up studies. He wants to see an algorithm developed that would be applicable to multiple ethnicities and not just people of Chinese descent.“I’m interested to relate our blood-based biomarkers to their aging biomarkers,” he said. “I would love to see if someone has the blood older than expected and their facial features are also older.”Horvath said he and other researchers are hoping that by finding aging markers in blood, tissue and now face scans, doctors will be able to find patients at high risk for certain health complications and treat them proactively. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Why You May Soon Be Eating More GMO Produce

Why You May Soon Be Eating More GMO Produce Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Cancer-fighting pink pineapples, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils could be hitting grocery shelves someday soon if various U.S. food safety agencies give the green light to more produce from genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.But even if they don’t, there’s a good chance you’re already eating GMOs, Gregory Jaffe, the director of biotechnology for Center for Science in the Public Interest, told ABC News. Eight different types of GMO crops are already in use in the U.S., Jaffe said: Corn, soy beans, cotton, canola, sugar beets, alfalfa, squash and papaya.“The majority of those crops are now GMO,” Jaffe noted.Two other GMO crops -- apples and potatoes -- have also been approved for sale but are not yet commercially available. And several other types of produce are now winding their way through testing with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture or some other governmental agency, Jaffe said.For example, a new pink pineapple variety being developed in Costa Rica by Del Monte Fresh Produce contains a gene from a pineapple and a tangerine. Some of its other genes have been silenced and its flowering process has been altered. All this genetic fiddling has produced a fruit with rose-colored flesh that is high in the cancer-fighting chemical lycopene.Humans have been genetically modifying their food for centuries through techniques like hybridization and selective breeding, Pamela Ronald, a plant scientist with the University of California, Davis, pointed out.“Modern genetic alteration is different in that it splices genes from another species into another to produce some beneficial trait,” she said.But the benefits of this DNA manipulation can sometimes be offset by unforeseen negatives, Jaffe said. In some cases they might accidentally introduce an allergen or they might harm the environment, he said.While he believes all GMO-containing food currently on the market is safe to eat, Jaffe said CSPI is calling for mandatory FDA approval before allowing a crop to be sold to the public.Testing for GMO products is currently voluntary, according to an FDA spokeswoman.“Although the consultation process is voluntary, compliance with the law is mandatory; it is the manufacturer's responsibility to ensure that the food products it offers for sale are safe and otherwise comply with applicable requirements,” the spokeswoman said in a statement to ABC News.GMO plants should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, Ronald said.“With any kind of breeding, there is a possibility of unintended consequences,” she said. “That is always a risk that scares people but it has to be put in perspective -- the risk is no different than for other type of crop.”If approved, the Del Monte Fresh pineapple could be sold but not grown in the U.S. The company has said the fruit is produced in a way that prevents seed production or pollination, reducing the chances it could cause harm to the environment. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Tylenol Shown to Be Ineffective in Relieving Certain Aches

Tylenol Shown to Be Ineffective in Relieving Certain AchesBrendan Smialowski/Getty Images(SYDNEY) — Popping a couple of Tylenol for every ache and pain you might have isn’t such a great idea, according to researchers from the University of Sydney in Australia.The study suggests that Tylenol, which is the brand name in the U.S. for the over-the-counter painkiller acetaminophen, does little to relieve arthritis of the knee and hip and has virtually no effect on lower back pain.Lead author Gustavo Machado says that an analysis of 13 studies apparently contradicts current clinical guidelines that acetaminophen should be the first drug taken to ease the pain and discomfort of osteoarthritis and lower back pain.Machado also points out that exceeding the maximum recommended dosage of 4,000 milligrams daily (about eight extra-strength Tylenol) can lead to serious liver damage.Responding to the study, Tylenol maker McNeil Consumer Healthcare said that “The safety and efficacy profile of acetaminophen is supported by more than 150 studies over the past 50 years,” and advised that more research be done before there's any consideration of changing the clinical guidelines of its use.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Study Says More Boys Born in US than Girls

Study Says More Boys Born in US than GirlsHemera/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — All people are supposed to be created equal but in truth, males have the slight edge over females when it comes to being born.A Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences report found that there are more boys than girls being born in the U.S. upon examination of “the sex ratios of fetuses at different gestational ages…and census records of fetal deaths and live births.”Scientists from Harvard and Oxford Universities, who authored the study, say while the human birth ratio is equal during conception, more male embryos die initially while over the next 10-to-15 weeks, female embryos are in greater jeopardy of something going wrong.Later in pregnancy, male miscarriages outnumbered those of females, particularly during weeks 28 to 35. However, more girls still died in the womb than boys.The researchers say their findings are the opposite of earlier studies that claimed more males are conceived than their counterpart but that more males die during pregnancy.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Excessive Video Game Playtime Can Affect Kids’ Behavior, Study Finds

Excessive Video Game Playtime Can Affect Kids’ Behavior, Study FindsiStock/Thinkstock(OXFORD, England) — Don't worry so much about your children playing violent video games. Worry more about the time they actually spend with their games and controllers.That's the takeaway from a new study that actually found no definitive link between the types of games youngsters player and outward aggression and bad study habits.However, University of Oxford researchers led by study author Dr. Andy Przybylski say that children who spend three or more hours daily playing video games tend to be hyperactive, do worse in school and are more apt to pick fights than their peers. They based their findings on teacher evaluations of 200 students ages 12 and 13, matched with surveys the same youngsters filled out about their video game habits.The Oxford study appears to corroborate a previous recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics that parents should monitor their children's digital playtime.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Motorists React More Quickly to Road Signs That Show Motion

Motorists React More Quickly to Road Signs That Show MotioniStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Motorists see a stop sign and they stop because it’s the law and because they’re trained to do so after so much time behind the wheel. Yet, some road signs can be more effective than others when they post dynamic symbols indicating motion, according to researchers who examined this phenomenon.The researchers from the University of Virginia, University of Michigan and Brigham Young University used eye tracking technology and other methods to learn how drivers react to perceived motion on road signs.They put participants through a series of simulated exercises that involved them driving by children’s crossing signs at school and signs used at mall crosswalks. They were also tested as if on foot, seeing wet floors and caution signs used in buildings.In virtually all instances, the reaction time was much swifter when people came to signs that showed symbols of motion.  Although the researchers are at something of a loss to explain why this happens, they nonetheless feel that redesigning signs could lead to fewer accident-related injuries and deaths.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Medical Schools Lacking in Courses Teaching Physical Activity

Medical Schools Lacking in Courses Teaching Physical ActivityiStock/Thinkstock(CORVALLIS, Ore.) — If you can’t recall the last time your personal physician told you about the benefits of exercise, you’re probably not alone.Brad Cardinal, an Oregon State University professor of exercise and sport science, says the problem has to do with medical schools failing to teach students about the importance of staying fit.The point was proven through an analysis of data from 118 accredited medical schools that listed their curriculum online. Of that group, half offered no courses related to physical activity, 21 percent offered just one course on the topic and of the schools that featured course work related to physical activity, less than one in five made them required.Cardinal and his team came away from their research somewhat disappointed since doctors are often their patients’ go-to source for information about personal health.Although Cardinal doesn’t doubt the expertise of physicians when it comes to knowing what’s right for the people they care for, what they need to learn is how to relate to a patient’s specific needs, which can come from formal education on the medical school level.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Teen Heart Transplant Recipient Dies in Fatal Police Car Chase

Teen Heart Transplant Recipient Dies in Fatal Police Car Chase Coloriffic/iStock/Thinkstock(ROSWELL, Ga.) -- A Georgia teen who received a heart transplant less than two years ago has died in a car accident while fleeing police, according to officials.Anthony Stokes, 17, was driving a car that matched the description of a car used to flee a home burglary, in which a masked person allegedly shot a gun at an 81-year-old woman who was home watching television, Roswell Police spokeswoman Officer Lisa Holland told ABC News.When officers tried to pull the vehicle over, the driver allegedly refused to stop, and they chased him, she said."The car lost control at an intersection, ran over a curb, hit a pedestrian and ran into big, metal pole," Holland said.Stokes died Tuesday night from injuries sustained in the crash.Stokes had an enlarged heart in 2013 and was given six months to live without a heart transplant. At the time, doctors said they wouldn't give him a transplant because of "noncompliance," which means they didn't think he could be trusted to follow medical directions.His mother, Melencia Hamilton, told ABC News at the time that she thought doctors made their decision to deny Anthony because he had low grades and trouble with the law."He was just fighting," Hamilton said. "Trying to take up, just trying to take up for his brother because somebody was bullying his brother."The hospital then reversed its decision, and Stokes underwent the transplant in August 2013.NYU Langone bioethicist Art Caplan said Stokes's case was a difficult one to begin with, but Tuesday's events don't change anything."The bottom line is I don't really think today's sad events mean two years ago we shouldn't have given him a chance," Caplan said. "We didn't know what would happen to him."He said even prisoners are sometimes given organ transplants, and teens, who are often not good at complying with medical directions, get organ transplants all the time."You almost always have to live with some people who are going to get into things post-transplant that we might not like," he said. "That's just humanity." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Teen Heart Transplant Recipient Dies in Fatal Police Car Chase

Teen Heart Transplant Recipient Dies in Fatal Police Car Chase Coloriffic/iStock/Thinkstock(ROSWELL, Ga.) -- A Georgia teen who received a heart transplant less than two years ago has died in a car accident while fleeing police, according to officials.Anthony Stokes, 17, was driving a car that matched the description of a car used to flee a home burglary, in which a masked person allegedly shot a gun at an 81-year-old woman who was home watching television, Roswell Police spokeswoman Officer Lisa Holland told ABC News.When officers tried to pull the vehicle over, the driver allegedly refused to stop, and they chased him, she said."The car lost control at an intersection, ran over a curb, hit a pedestrian and ran into big, metal pole," Holland said.Stokes died Tuesday night from injuries sustained in the crash.Stokes had an enlarged heart in 2013 and was given six months to live without a heart transplant. At the time, doctors said they wouldn't give him a transplant because of "noncompliance," which means they didn't think he could be trusted to follow medical directions.His mother, Melencia Hamilton, told ABC News at the time that she thought doctors made their decision to deny Anthony because he had low grades and trouble with the law."He was just fighting," Hamilton said. "Trying to take up, just trying to take up for his brother because somebody was bullying his brother."The hospital then reversed its decision, and Stokes underwent the transplant in August 2013.NYU Langone bioethicist Art Caplan said Stokes's case was a difficult one to begin with, but Tuesday's events don't change anything."The bottom line is I don't really think today's sad events mean two years ago we shouldn't have given him a chance," Caplan said. "We didn't know what would happen to him."He said even prisoners are sometimes given organ transplants, and teens, who are often not good at complying with medical directions, get organ transplants all the time."You almost always have to live with some people who are going to get into things post-transplant that we might not like," he said. "That's just humanity." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

FDA Offers Final Guidance on Painkillers with Abuse-Deterrent Properties

FDA Offers Final Guidance on Painkillers with Abuse-Deterrent Properties moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released its "final guidance" on opioid painkillers with potentially abuse-deterrent properties on Wednesday.In the 29-page report, the FDA aimed to explain its "current thinking about the studies that should be conducted to demonstrate that a given formulation has abuse-deterrent properties." The FDA notes that opioid drugs provide "significant benefit for patients when used properly," but that the risk of abuse and death are worrisome.Because of that, the FDA is encouraging manufacturers to develop drugs that work correctly when taken as prescribed, but make it difficult to abuse. "While drugs with abuse-deterrent properties are not 'abuse-proof,' the FDA sees this guidance as an important step toward balancing appropriate access to opioids for patients with pain with the importance of reducing opioid misuse and abuse," an FDA press release reads.FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a statement that "the science of abuse-deterrent medication is rapidly evolving, and the FDA is eager to engage with manufacturers to help make these medications available to patients who need them." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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