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New App Can Predict Your Death Date

New App Can Predict Your Death Date

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Most people don’t know what they’ll be doing this weekend, much less the answer to the biggest question of all: When are you going to die? Well, a new iOS app called Deadline can’t make plans for your weekend but it will supposedly give you an idea of when you’ll meet your maker, provided something unforeseen doesn’t happen first.Scanning your iPhone’s Healthkit tool, Deadline uses information like height, blood pressure, hours slept, steps walked daily and a few other pertinent facts to give you a ballpark date and time of when you’ll breathe your last breath.The app's maker, Gist LLC, wrote on the Apple iTunes page that, “No app can really accurately determine when you will die. Instead, the app actually monitors your own health and motivates you to make better lifestyle choices or consult a physician, if necessary.”So while no one lives forever, at least you might be able to improve your lifestyle a bit to extend your own personal deadline.

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Violent Movies, Video Games May Not Have Notable Effect on Real World Violence

Violent Movies, Video Games May Not Have Notable Effect on Real World Violence

Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers say that violence in the media may not have a significant impact on real world violence.A study published in the Journal of Communication looked at an array of movies from 1920 to 2005, noting the frequency of violence in each film. Those figures were then compared to the per capita homicide rates in the United States for the same years. Researchers say no link was found between the two figures. A second study, conducted by the same researchers compared violent video games from 1996 to 2011 with youth violence during those same years. That study found that increased sales of violent games was actually linked to a decline in youth violence. The researchers concluded that such a correlation is most likely due to chance.

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Early Signs of Coronary Artery Disease Could Mean Increased Risk of Heart Attack, Early Death

Early Signs of Coronary Artery Disease Could Mean Increased Risk of Heart Attack, Early Death

HEMARAT/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers say that even the earliest signs of coronary artery disease could represent significantly increased risk of heart attack and early death.According to the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, even patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease -- where plaque buildup is present, but not sufficient to block blood flow or cause symptoms -- could carry a greater risk of heart attack. Researchers looked at more than 37,000 patients -- 8,384 with nonobstructive coronary artery disease and 20,899 with no apparent coronary artery disease. Within one year, 845 of the patients had died and 385 were hospitalized with heart attacks. Researchers found that the rate of heart attack increased based on the number of vessels impacted by nonobstructive coronary artery disease. Even one vessel with some plaque buildup made patients more than twice as likely to suffer a heart attack than those with no signs of coronary artery disease.Similar increases were found in risk of mortality.

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Study Says Mothers Contribute to Infants’ Language Environment More than Fathers

Study Says Mothers Contribute to Infants’ Language Environment More than Fathers

Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers around the country say that their study determined that mothers play a significantly bigger role in the language environment experienced by infants than fathers do.The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, looked at 33 infants born in two-parent homes by attaching recording devices to the children. Speech vocalizations were recorded at birth, at a few weeks of age, and at seven months old. In analyzing "language-like sounds," researchers found that 70 percent of adult responses to infants' vocalization came from mothers.Interestingly, while 30 percent of adult responses came from fathers, only 10 percent came from fathers who were alone with their child. The other 20 percent were fathers who were with their child in the presence of the mother.Researchers further found that children generally respond preferentially to their mother's voice over their father's.

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WHO Recommends Increased Access to So-Called Overdose Antidote

WHO Recommends Increased Access to So-Called Overdose Antidote

Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The World Health Organization released updated guidelines on Tuesday that say naloxone, the so-called overdose antidote that reverses the effects of opioids, such as heroin, should be more widely available.The guidelines were updated with the goal of reducing the number of deaths from opioid overdose each year. The WHO cites figures that show approximately 69,000 people die from opioid overdose each year. Among intravenous drug users, opioid overdose is second only to HIV/AIDS for cause of death.The key recommendations in the updated guidelines include increased availability of naloxone to those who are "likely to witness an opioid overdose, including people at risk of an overdose, their family and friends, and anyone whose work brings them in contact with people susceptible to overdoses, including health care workers, police and emergency service workers."

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Researchers Say Google Glass Obstructs Wearers’ Peripheral Vision

Researchers Say Google Glass Obstructs Wearers’ Peripheral Vision

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for AOL Inc.(NEW YORK) -- Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco say that wearing Google Glass, the polarizing wearable technology that has frenzied techies and critics for different reasons, may inhibit the wearer's peripheral vision.According to the study, published in a letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the users' peripheral vision was significantly obstructed by blind spots. Those blind spots, the study found, exist even when the wearing and head positions are altered.The researchers said their study was likely the first evaluation of "the effect of wearable electronics with head-mounted display on vision." Interest in such technology has increased in recent years as more products are produced.Researchers say that the largest blind spot in their testing was in the upper right quadrant of the users' field of vision. Blind spots were identified only as an obstruction from the product's hardware design, and did not include "a distracting effect of software-related interference."The study is, however, limited by a small number of participants, and researchers say that additional studies will be needed to fully understand the effects of products like Google Glass on users' vision.

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Why The Midterm Election May Affect Your Health Care

Why The Midterm Election May Affect Your Health Care

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Health care may seem like it's faded into the background this midterm election cycle, but there is actually a lot at stake for many aspects of Obamacare.

In particular, the future of Medicaid expansion may be altered depending on which way the votes go.

Here’s a guide to what could change and why it matters:

First, an explanation:

Medicaid is a federally funded program that provides health care to low-income Americans. The Affordable Care Act expanded the program to cover more people, but a ruling by the Supreme Court allowed states to choose whether or not to implement that provision. To date, 23 states -- mostly conservative and Republican-controlled -- have elected not to expand.

Why not expand?

The main argument against expansion is that it’s too expensive and the federal government can’t continue supporting it long-term, said Scott Brunner, a senior analyst with the Kansas Health Institute and a former Kansas state Medicaid director.

“Many non-expansion states want to focus on improving quality of care before offering it to more people,” he added.

Those in favor of expansion believe it would provide health care to hundreds of thousands more people who currently can’t afford it, Brunner said, adding that a larger program might also stimulate the economy by creating health care-related jobs.

What’s at stake:

While the focus of this election cycle has largely been on the Senate races and who will control Congress, it's probably the governor's races that will have the most influence on the direction of health care, said Dr. Benjamin Sommers, an assistant professor of health policy and economics at the Harvard School of Public Health.

“In states that have not yet expanded, there is still a significant debate going on,” he said. “Several very competitive governors’ elections include states that are on the fence about expansion.”

For example, Maine’s current governor, Paul LePage, has vetoed Medicaid expansion five times. If he loses today’s tight election to his Democratic opponent, Mike Michaud, Maine is more likely to go with expansion, Sommers said.

There is a similar scenario unfolding in Florida, Sommers added, but it is less clear in other battleground states whether a new governor alone would have enough authority to expand Medicaid without support from state government.

In Arkansas, a conservative state that has already opted for expansion, a reverse scenario is possible, Sommers said. Should the GOP candidate, Asa Hutchinson, win the close governor’s race, it isn’t clear whether or not he will vote to extend the expansion. Even if he does, the extension needs 75 percent of the votes of the state House and state Senate. If they gain control, several Republican candidates have pledged to end expansion.

The Bottom Line

Benefits are easier to add than take away, according to Sommers, so the Affordable Care Act is unlikely to go away anytime soon. But it is possible to reshape it and chip away at it at the state level.

“These elections can determine the direction of health care for the next few years,” Sommers said.

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Kaci Hickox’s Boyfriend Bets ‘You Can Guess Who We Voted For’

Kaci Hickox’s Boyfriend Bets ‘You Can Guess Who We Voted For’

iStock/Thinkstock(AUGUSTA, Maine) -- The Maine nurse who fought quarantine rules after returning from treating Ebola patients in West Africa has cast her ballot.But Kaci Hickox didn't go to the polls -- instead, she voted via absentee ballot on Monday, her lawyer told ABC News.Hickox's boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, told ABC News on Tuesday, "We voted yesterday in absentia, and you can guess who we voted for. We encourage all the good people of Maine to join us in returning decency to Blaine house."Blaine House is where the Maine governor, now Paul LePage, has traditionally resided for nearly 100 years. The incumbent Republican who is running for re-election had tried to force Hickox to take a blood test.

A judge ruled in Hickox's favor last week after state officials tried to legally enforce a mandatory quarantine for her that went beyond federal health guidelines. Then Gov. Paul LePage tried to force her to take a blood test for Ebola even though she tested negative for the deadly virus twice after being placed in an isolation tent in Newark, New Jersey, and false negative tests are possible even after a person is symptomatic.Hickox, 33, has said she has not had Ebola symptoms. Hickox agreed Monday to active monitoring until Nov. 10, prompting officials to cancel a hearing scheduled for today that would have rehashed the quarantine debate. She is allowed to leave her home.

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China’s Smog Prompts Face Masks on Fashion Week Runways

China’s Smog Prompts Face Masks on Fashion Week Runways

ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images(BEIJING) -- There's a new fashion statement hitting Chinese runways: the beautiful smog mask.

Fashion designers incorporated the pollution-blocking masks into their designs for Mercedes-Benz China Fashion Week in Beijing less than two weeks after Beijing marathoners donned masks for their 26.2-mile race on Oct. 19.

Earlier this year, the World Health Organization reported that more than 7 million premature deaths worldwide are linked to air pollution each year.

"Not for casual reasons are they called 'killer smogs,'" said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. "Intense smog often cause a lot of asthma and respiratory stress and can precipitate heart attacks and things like that."

Smog has consistently been a problem for industrialized China, whose thick fog of pollution is primarily the result of burning coal, said Dr. Dorr Dearborn, an environmental health expert at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital. And indoor pollution in rural homes may actually be worse than outdoor pollution in cities, he said.

Although a fiber painter's mask won't do much to block out the airborne particles, Dearborn said, masks called N95 and N100 masks are effective.

It was not clear what materials the fashion designers were using.

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Ebola-Free Patients Often Suffer Other Health Problems

Ebola-Free Patients Often Suffer Other Health Problems

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — West African Ebola survivors may suffer vision loss and long-term poor health in what one doctor calls "post-Ebola syndrome."Dr. Margaret Nanyonga, who treated Ebola patients in Kenema, Sierra Leone, told a World Health Organization conference that half of those cured of the virus reported declining health resulting in body aches, chest pain, headaches and fatigue that are consistent with symptoms experienced by survivors in previous outbreaks.Nanyonga also said that a number of Ebola survivors also experienced either clouded vision or progressive vision loss, including two of her patients who went blind.Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, admitted that while he's not familiar with post-Ebola syndrome, he's not surprised that the health of West African Ebola survivors deteriorates after recovery.“You can imagine when people recover from Ebola there will be a period of time when they are fatigued, particularly if they have led a rough existence of poverty and poor nutrition,” Schaffner said.Support for survivors is gradually emerging, including a post-Ebola clinic in Kenema to deal with survivors’ psychological and social needs, according to WHO. Nanyonga said she had developed an assessment tool to track common and disabling symptoms.

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Why Sadness Seems to Go On and On and On

Why Sadness Seems to Go On and On and On

iStock/Thinkstock(LEUVEN, Belgium) — If you're unhappy and you know it, clasp your hands and then try to figure out why sadness seems to linger much longer than all other emotions.Actually, researchers Philippe Verduyn and Saskia Lavrijsen at the University of Leuven in Belgium have done the work for you and their conclusion is that sadness is often associated with traumatic events of lasting consequence such as death, divorce or job loss.To conduct their study, Verduyn and Lavrijsen had 200 high school students recount various emotions and their duration.  Measured against 26 other emotions, sadness hung around the longest. As a matter of fact, it can last up to 240 times longer than such emotions as fear, disgust or irritation, which come and go quickly because they're generally linked to incidents of relative unimportance.Another interesting finding is that duration is the chief difference between similar emotions, which explains why guilt and anxiety will preoccupy people longer than shame and fear.

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Early Detection Cancer Blood Test on the Horizon

Early Detection Cancer Blood Test on the Horizon

iStock/Thinkstock(COVENTRY, England) — Scientists in the United Kingdom believe they're on the verge of developing a single early detection cancer blood test.Professor Ian Cree from the University of Warwick and University Hospital in Coventry remarked, "A single blood-based screening test would be a game-changer for early detection of cancer, which could help make it a curable disease for many more patients."Conducted by the U.K. Early Cancer Detection Consortium, researchers found 800 possible signs of cancer in the blood that are called biomarkers.This discovery may lead to a general screening test for various kinds of cancers, including rarer forms of the disease, in a less invasive fashion so that they can be treated earlier and possibly cured.Cree says that the next step in the process is trying to discern which of the hundreds of biomarkers found "work the best for spotting cancers."

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Many Die Within a Week of Receiving Hospice Care

Many Die Within a Week of Receiving Hospice Care

iStock/Thinkstock(ALEXANDRIA, Va.) — Hospice care, which is intended to make people more comfortable as they near the end of life, often comes too late to be truly effective.A report by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization says that a third of the 1.5 million patients who received this specialized treatment last year passed away within a week of receiving it.In fact, half receiving hospice care were alive for less than 18 days from the point when they were first visited by health care workers trained in helping and comforting those whose conditions can't be improved by medicine.Donald Schumacher, president and CEO of the NHPCO, said in a statement, "We need to reach patients earlier in the course of their illness to ensure they receive the full benefits that hospice and palliative care can offer."In one bit of brighter news, 66 percent of hospice care was provided at the places where people lived, whether it was their own homes, residential facilities or long-term care centers.

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Researchers Suggest Working Night Shifts May Cause Decline in Cognitive Skills

Researchers Suggest Working Night Shifts May Cause Decline in Cognitive Skills

moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers in France say that working the night shift can hurt your brain, impairing cognitive abilities in the long run.The study, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine, looked at over 3,000 employed and retired workers over a 10-year period. The researchers found that patients who had worked odd hours -- defined as either alternating morning and night shifts, working so late that they could not sleep before midnight, waking up before 5 a.m., or working pure night shifts -- had a significant decline in cognitive skills equivalent to 6.5 years in worsening cognition. The decline included memory and attention span, researchers say. Additionally, those who had worked odd shifts for more than 10 years suffered even more. However, by stopping such shift work for at least five years, patients recovered some cognitive function.Researchers say the data shows the lasting dangers of working odd shifts.

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Study Suggests Weight-Loss Surgery May Lower Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Study Suggests Weight-Loss Surgery May Lower Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Victor_69/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers in the United Kingdom believe they have found evidence that weight-loss surgery may help to cut a patient's risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 80 percent.The study, published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, looked at nearly 4,400 obese patients divided up evenly based on whether they had had weight-loss surgery. Seven years after having the surgery, only about 4.3 percent of those patients had developed type 2 diabetes. Of the individuals who had not had surgery, 16.2 percent developed type 2 diabetes in that same time span.Researchers say the study shows a link between modern weight-loss surgery and reduced diabetes risk.Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2010.

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Nurse Kaci Hickox Agrees to Self-Monitor Until Nov. 10

Nurse Kaci Hickox Agrees to Self-Monitor Until Nov. 10

ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) -- Kaci Hickox, the nurse who treated Ebola patients in West Africa and fought a mandatory quarantine last week, will not need to participate in a hearing Tuesday to rehash whether she'll need to stay home for the next 10 days.A judge in Augustus, Maine, ruled in Hickox's favor Friday, issuing a temporary order that she could leave her home and spend time in public spaces despite state officials' attempts to force her into mandatory quarantine and force her to take an Ebola blood test.The matter was scheduled for a hearing Tuesday, but that hearing has been canceled because Hickox agreed to comply with the temporary order until her 21-day incubation period is up on Nov 10. She will need to participate in active monitoring, coordinate her travel with officials and report any symptoms if they appear."We just found common ground with the state of Maine," Hickox's lawyer, Norman Siegel, told ABC News. "You can find it. You just have to work hard and listen even if you disagree with them."Hickox had been treating patients in Sierra Leone with Doctors Without Borders before she returned to the United States and landed in Newark Liberty International airport on Oct. 24. Upon landing, she was questioned for six hours and quarantined in an isolation tent through the weekend.On Monday, she was allowed to drive home to Maine. Once there, officials first suggested a voluntary quarantine and then sought to legally enforce it.But Hickox said she wouldn't comply because the quarantine rules weren't "scientifically valid." She said she fought the quarantine for all the other health workers expected to return from West Africa in the coming weeks.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, she can't spread Ebola -- which she's twice tested negative for -- if she doesn't have symptoms, and even then, others would need to be in contact with her bodily fluids to catch it."I am humbled today by the judge's decision and even more humbled by the support that we have received by the town of Fort Kent, the state of Maine, across the United States and even across the border," Hickox, 33, told reporters Monday from her home in Fort Kent.

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What You Need to Know About Movember and No-Shave November

What You Need to Know About Movember and No-Shave November

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Welcome to November, the month where all your male friends and co-workers show up clean-shaven and baby-faced on Nov. 1 and look like western-movie villains or grizzly bears by Thanksgiving.Growing out one's facial hair for 30 days is called "Movember" or "No-Shave November," and it's meant to raise awareness for cancer. It's also a chance for dudes to show off their 'staches, goatees, Fu Manchus, mutton chops and other furry face-warmers.Here's your guide to the mustachioed month-long event:What is Movember?Movember began in Australia in 2003 to raise awareness for prostate and testicular cancers, according to the Movember Foundation, a nonprofit that raised nearly $21 million in 2013."We are all about the mustache and only the mustache," said Movember's U.S. Director Mark Hedstrom. "What we're asking them to do is participate by changing their appearance. What that fosters is a conversation."From there, Hedstrom said men can explain why they're growing a mustache and start talking about men's health.Now, it has campaigns in 21 countries, according to the organization. This year, the U.S. Movember campaign will also include men's mental health and men's fitness, Hedstrom said.What is No-Shave November?No-Shave November is a different organization that encourages people to donate what they would otherwise spend on hair grooming to the American Cancer Society.Instead of being "all about the mustache" this group is a little more anything goes. Participants can grow mustaches and beards, but it also encourages women to maybe skip shaving their legs.No-Shave November was founded on Facebook in 2009, but last year began a partnership with the American Cancer Society.How can I participate?To participate in Movember, start with a fresh face at the beginning of the month and "donate your face" until Nov. 30 by not shaving. You're like a fuzzy billboard for mean's health issues. You can raise funds, too. The Movember Project has donated more than 800 programs to date.To participate in No-Shave November, give up one of your hair grooming practices and donate what you'd normally spend on it toward cancer research."Nearly everyone spends some amount of his or her hard-earned money on grooming, whether that's shaving, waxing, trimming or threading," according to No-Shave November's website. "If just for November, those individuals gave that cost (ranging from a few dollars for razors to a $100 salon visit) to a cancer charity instead, friends and family alone could pool together a sizable chunk of change to help cancer patients and their families."Can't grow a mo'?No problem. Not every man can grow a mustache, and that's OK."There's no such thing as a perfect mustache. Every mustache is perfect in its own unique way," said Adam Paul Cousgrove, the chief executive of the American Mustache Institute, which chooses an official Mustached Man of the Year annually. "They're the snowflakes of the face."Women can participate in Movember by pushing the men in their lives to grow out mustaches and getting them to be active as part of Movember's new "Move" initiative."We're trying to practice what we preach," Hedstrom said. "Diet and exercise are key to a healthy lifestyle."Or women can skip the salon visit (or leg shave or whatever) and participate in No-Shave November by donating that money to the American Cancer Society.What do I need to know about prostate cancer?Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancers in the United States with an estimated 233,000 new cases in 2014, according to the National Cancer Institute. That means it accounts for 14 percent of all new cancer cases.An estimated 29,000 people will die of prostate cancer this year, according to the National Institutes of Health, meaning it accounts for about 5 percent of all cancer deaths.What do I need to know about testicular cancer?The NIH estimates that 8,820 people will be diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2014, and 380 people will die from it.What do I need to know about cancer in general?An estimated 1,665,540 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2014, according to the NIH. And an estimated 585,720 people will die of cancer.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease.What if I want to keep my mustache afterward?You would make the American Mustache Institute very happy."We're here to show that the mustache is here to stay," Cousgrove said. "We're a hearty, ruggedly good-looking people."

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‘Post-Ebola Syndrome’ Persists After Virus Is Cured, Doctor Says

‘Post-Ebola Syndrome’ Persists After Virus Is Cured, Doctor Says

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- West Africans fortunate to survive Ebola may go on to develop what's being called "post-Ebola syndrome," characterized by vision loss and long-term poor health, a doctor told the World Health Organization.“We are seeing a lot of people with vision problems,” Dr. Margaret Nanyonga, a psycho-social support officer for WHO, said at a conference in Sierra Leone last week. “Some complain of clouded vision, but for others the visual loss is progressive. I have seen two people who are now blind.”Approximately 50 percent of Ebola survivors she has treated in Kenema, Sierra Leone’s third-largest city, report declining health after fighting off the deadly virus, Nanyonga said. Besides deteriorating vision, they are complaining of body aches, chest pain, headaches and fatigue. This is consistent with symptoms experienced by survivors in previous outbreaks, she said.Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert who is a professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, said he was not aware of a post-Ebola syndrome but was not surprised that the health of West African Ebola survivors deteriorates after recovery.“You can imagine when people recover from Ebola there will be a period of time when they are fatigued, particularly if they have led a rough existence of poverty and poor nutrition,” he said.Though he was not aware of any survivors having vision problems, he speculated that the virus could attack the blood vessels that line the interior walls of the eyes. Without thorough eye exams -- which he doubted are happening in places like Sierra Leone -- he said he was hesitant to pin the reason for loss of vision on Ebola.There are very few scientific reports looking at the ongoing health problems of those who are cured of Ebola. In one small study, a majority of 29 people who survived a 1995 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo reported a significant amount of joint pain, muscle aches and fatigue. They were still experiencing deteriorating health up to a year and a half after recovery, the researchers found.Support for survivors is gradually emerging, including a post-Ebola clinic in Kenema to deal with survivors’ psychological and social needs, according to WHO. Nanyonga said she had developed an assessment tool to track common and disabling symptoms.“We need to understand why these symptoms persist, whether they are caused by the disease or treatment, or perhaps the heavy disinfection,” she said.

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A Fifth of Adults Say They Live with Chronic Pain

A Fifth of Adults Say They Live with Chronic Pain

iStock/Thinkstock(SPOKANE, Wash.) — Chronic pain is an unpleasant way of life for nearly one in five adults in the U.S.Study author Jae Kennedy, a researcher at Washington State University in Spokane, polled 35,000 households to learn that 39 million people have to deal with persistent pain each day.Kennedy did not include adults who complain about arthritis or back pain because it's often not constant.That still left 19 percent of the adult population with pain so serious that a majority said it was either constantly present or even "unbearable and excruciating" at times.Most of those feeling chronic pain are people 60 to 69; women; the obese or overweight; people who were hospitalized during the past year; and those who claimed their health was fair or poor.What's more, Kennedy says that persistent physical discomfort can lead to psychological distress as well."Going forward, it will be important to track changes in rates of persistent pain within the U.S., and compare these rates to other countries with different health care systems," Kennedy said.

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Marijuana Reform Supported by Most in High School

Marijuana Reform Supported by Most in High School

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A survey of high school seniors found that most 18 year olds want marijuana reform.According to the study, published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, nearly one-third of students surveyed felt marijuana should be entirely legal, and nearly three in 10 say that pot possession should be treated as a minor violation.The survey included 12,000 students between 2007 and 2011. Researchers did find those more likely to be in favor of legalization were black, liberal and urban students while women, conservatives, religious students and those with friends who disapprove of marijuana use were less likely to support legalization.Interestingly, nearly 17 percent of those students who had never used marijuana before were in favor of legalization.

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