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College Student Sells Car to Invent Inflatable Baby Incubator

College Student Sells Car to Invent Inflatable Baby Incubator

James Dyson Foundation(NEW YORK) -- A recent college graduate has turned a school assignment, originally funded by selling his car, into an award-winning invention with the potential to save lives.James Roberts, 23, was named the International Winner of the James Dyson Award this week for inventing an inflatable baby incubator that could potentially be deployed in areas without medical resources.Roberts was a student at Loughborough University in England when he first become "obsessed" with building an incubator after seeing a documentary on Syria and learning that infants were dying there without medical access.Roberts, who now lives in south London, said initially the project started as an assignment to “design a product that solves a problem," but that he quickly became obsessed with making it work.Roberts said once he started with the project, he spent 18-hour days working on it and sold his car to fund prototypes and his research.“It wasn’t fun,” Roberts said. “Having no weekends and being a zombie.”After nine months of work both developing the prototype and talking to aid agencies and midwives about the needs of prenatal infants, Roberts had a working machine: the MOM incubator.

Roberts' MOM incubator is designed for areas without regular access to medical care. It is collapsible and can be blown up manually. A computer can control the humidity and temperature so that premature infants are protected from cold or dry air.The machine also has a phototherapy unit for jaundiced infants.Roberts said he was looking for investors and partners when he entered the 2014 James Dyson Award contest, which gives up to 45,000 British pounds (about $71,000) for products that “have a significant and practical purpose, are commercially viable, and are designed with sustainability in mind.”When Roberts found out he was a finalist, he said he was mostly excited to meet Dyson himself, a British inventor famous for his bagless vacuum cleaner.“He stuck out his hand and said, ‘Well done, you’ve won,’” Roberts said. “I almost collapsed.”Dyson said the invention had the potential to save thousands. The prize awarded Roberts' team with 45,000 pounds for additional prototyping and another 15,000 pounds (about $23,700) for Loughborough University.“[Roberts'] invention shows the impact design engineering can have on people’s lives," Dyson said in a statement. "The western world takes incubators for granted. We don’t think about how their inefficient design makes them unusable in developing countries and disaster zones.”While Roberts is still looking for investors, he hopes the Dyson award money will allow him to produce his incubator prototype on his own terms so it can reach a wide variety of people across the globe.“My wildest dreams would be in 10 years [meeting someone] who was a kid,” he said, “and was in my incubator and survived.”

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Watch Kids, Adults React Differently to Question About Their Bodies

Watch Kids, Adults React Differently to Question About Their Bodies

Jubilee Project(NEW YORK) -- Kids and adults often want different things in life. Kids, for example, rarely want a new designer handbag. And adults don't generally long for their blankies in the middle of the day.And when it comes to body image -- specifically what kids and adults would change about their bodies -- the answers are astounding."Comfortable," a video posted to YouTube last week, has already had nearly 2.5 million views. It was created by the Jubilee Project, a company that makes short films, PSAs and documentaries "in collaboration with non-profits to increase awareness and inspire action." The video asks 50 people one question: "If you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?""Only one?" one woman laughs. "I would change my forehead," said another. "I have a really big forehead."Face puffiness, baby-rearing stretch marks, big ears and more, the adults tell the camera.And then there's the kids."You know, like have a mermaid tail," one girl responds. Teleportation, responds another. "I want legs like a cheetah so I can run faster like a cheetah," said one little boy. "Wings," said another.And ultimately:"I don't think there's anything to change.""I like my body actually," said the first girl. "Just the mermaid tail."Jubilee executive director Jason Y. Lee said the film is a reminder to us all that "we were each beautifully and uniquely made." We believe we look our best, he said, when we are confident and comfortable in our own skin."As a child," Lee said, "I was convinced that if I ate enough carrots I'd be able to see through walls. As I grew older, X-ray vision was joined by a long list of things I wanted to change about my body: clearer skin, more muscle, slightly taller, etc. That said, I haven't stopped eating carrots. A boy can dream, right?"

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CDC Offers Update on Chikungunya Virus

CDC Offers Update on Chikungunya Virus

Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released an update on the spread of chikungunya, the virus spread to the U.S. from the Caribbean beginning last December.The outbreak has caused an estimated 795,000 cases in 37 countries and territories, the CDC said. At least 1,600 travelers have been reported to have returned to the U.S. with chikungunya. Prior to the recent outbreak, the CDC says just 28 travelers with chikungunya entered the U.S. each year.Approximately nine million people travel between the U.S. and the Caribbean each year, the CDC estimates. Those travelers going to the Caribbean or Central or South America are advised to be aware of the risk this fall and winter, and make sure they use insect repellant."The beginning of fall means that mosquito problems in the continental United States will be decreasing," Dr. Roger Nasci, chief of the CDC's Arboviral Diseases Branch, said. "However, travelers to areas where the chikungunya outbreak continues are at risk of becoming infected."

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Texas Reaches Ebola Monitoring Endpoint

Texas Reaches Ebola Monitoring Endpoint

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- The last person being monitored in connection with the three patients diagnosed with Ebola in Texas will be cleared at the end of the day Friday from twice-daily monitoring.Health officials say the last person being monitored is a hospital worker who handled medical waste on Oct. 17.A total of 177 people have been monitored over 21 days because they had contact with one of the three Ebola patients in the state, specimens, or medical waste.“We’re happy to reach this milestone, but our guard stays up,” said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services in a statement. “We reached this point through teamwork and meticulous monitoring, and we’ll continue to be vigilant to protect Texas from Ebola.”State health officials continue to monitor all air travelers who return to Texas from counties with widespread Ebola outbreaks.The Centers for Disease Control has identified about 50 people who have returned to Texas from those areas.

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Devon Still’s Daughter Gets Ready for Dad’s Big Night

Devon Still’s Daughter Gets Ready for Dad’s Big Night

@Dev_Still71/Twitter(CINCINNATI) -- Leah Still flew from Philadelphia to Cincinnati to see her father play pro football for the first time on Thursday night, but the journey started long before she fastened her seat belt.Leah, the daughter of Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Devon Still, was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer in June when doctors discovered a mass in her abdomen. She's now feeling well enough to leave the hospital in Philadelphia. On Wednesday, she got her nails done before the flight to primp for the big game."She's just excited," Devon Still told ABC News' Cincinnati affiliate WCPO. "She said how she's going to be yelling in the crowd and stuff, so she's been feeling good."Although the Bengals had initially cut Still from the team, they re-signed him to their practice squad to help him keep his health insurance when they learned about Leah's diagnosis.Still was later re-added to the official team roster and will play in Thursday night's home game against the Cleveland Browns.

"Daddy, I'm on a plane," Leah said into a camera in a video message to her father on Wednesday night, which he posted on Instagram. "We have to go on another plane because this plane doesn't go all the way to Cincinnati."Leah then reminded him that he was supposed to pick her up at the airport.Devon Still captioned the video, "All the fame has went to her head. Now all of the sudden she doesn't do layovers she a direct flight type of kid."After the first quarter of the game, Leah is expected to be part of a ceremony in which the team presents a check to Cincinnati Children's Hospital for more than $1 million to go toward pediatric cancer research. The team raised money from sales of Still's jersey, No. 75, which sold out, according to the team's website.

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Make-A-Wish Grants Boy’s Dream to Star in World War II Film

Make-A-Wish Grants Boy’s Dream to Star in World War II Film

KABC(NEW YORK) -- The 8-year-old cancer survivor who experienced his wish to star in his very own World War II film had the time of his life seeing himself on screen this week in the movie he named Protecting Our Country’s Fate.“He thought it was amazing,” Tony Angel said of son Jacob, who saw a screening Wednesday. “He thought he feels like he’s a star.”Jacob Angel of North Hollywood, California, was able to don a tiny military uniform and take on the starring role in a short film set during World War II thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation.Tony Angel said his son has been obsessed with soldiers and war after seeing the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan.“He really has respect for soldiers and knows how hard it is and that it’s really not fun when [they’re] in combat,” Angel said of his son. “He feels it’s really honorable and that’s why he named the movie.”When Jacob shot the short film in July at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, California, he was still undergoing treatment for a rare form of kidney cancer called Wilms tumor. Jacob was diagnosed in March with Stage 3 cancer and underwent six months of treatments including chemotherapy and radiation.Angel said he didn’t know how his son had the energy to shoot the film only days after a chemotherapy treatment.“The scenes in the movie he’s climbing the hill and he mustered up the energy like how a solider would,” Angel said.Jacob had been sick in bed the day before, unable to retain any food or drink, according to his father.When asked what part of the film was his favorite, Jacob had an answer all ready. “When I stick the flag at the top of the hill, because it was like I just won the war,” he told ABC News affiliate KABC-TV in Los Angeles.After months of treatments, Jacob is now cancer-free and starting to gain weight back, his dad told the station.

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Woman Loses 110 Pounds in Two Years

Woman Loses 110 Pounds in Two Years

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Being overweight has been a lifetime struggle for Hanna Preston.At her heaviest, the self-proclaimed overeater weighed 265 pounds, but came to a turning point during her junior year of high school.“All of my friends were trying on their prom dresses and they felt so confident and just loved their dresses and I just longed for that,” Preston, 20, told ABC's Good Morning America.Preston became more determined than ever, and embarked on a two-year, weight-loss journey. At the end of it, she had lost 110 pounds.To maintain her weight loss, Preston, a college student from West Bridgewater, Massachusetts, has made major changes to her diet and lifestyle.“In the morning I have overnight oats," she said. "For lunch I like to have salads with all different kinds of veggies and then, for dinner, I like to have chicken with different sliced tomatoes, maybe some feta, different marinades."Preston doesn’t belong to a gym, but she walks three miles a day, works out to videos and uses a ThighMaster -- a device designed to work thighs and made famous by actress Suzanne Somers -- on her arms.“I find it works very well,” she said, laughing.Preston acknowledges that the journey hasn’t been without its challenges.“I do have my off days, but it's important to get right back on track and understand that your off day doesn't define your weight-loss journey,” she said.Preston now has a self-confidence she never had before.“I've heard from so many people that they're inspired by my story and that just builds my confidence so much more knowing that I was able to help somebody just even think about,” she said, “or take the first step in their own weight-loss journey.”Preston says she is now at her goal weight of around 155 pounds and is not trying to lose more weight. She is though, she says, still constantly challenged by her journey towards better health."With reaching my goal I have found new goals where I would like to become a little bit stronger, work on running rather than walking," she said. "It's just a journey and it's going to take some time to get used to."

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Cautionary Tales from People Obsessed with Candy Crush

Cautionary Tales from People Obsessed with Candy Crush

GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — More than two years after its launch, Candy Crush is still luring gamers with its bright lights, perky melody and simple puzzle design -- but some people say their interest has turned into addiction.Extreme players told ABC News they've found themselves hooked on the game, unable to concentrate on work or chores and even neglecting their children at times."From the time I started playing, it was just all I could think about," writer Erickka Sy Savane said. "I was one of those people you see on the trains and in the grocery store lines playing -- whenever I had a free moment."Savane, who lives in New Jersey, said she even started to ignore her two daughters."I would sneak away to be by myself so I could play," she said. "Put them to bed early, drop them off at school really quick -- just kinda push them to the side. It was all-consuming."Katie Volney, a publicist in Minneapolis, also describes herself as a former Candy Crush addict."My boyfriend and my family would get really annoyed when I was around them and I would be on my phone and iPad all the time," she said. "I even downloaded it on my boyfriend's iPad so I could send myself free lives."She quit playing so much after realizing how angry loved ones were getting while she was glued to the game. For Savane, quitting Candy Crush was an accident. One day she dropped her phone and the screen shattered -- making it hard to see those tiny, neon-colored candies."I was praying for a way out and I felt like in that moment I got the out that I needed," she said. "So I deleted the app from my phone and let the phone stay cracked for at least a month."Erin Fisher, another self-described Candy Crush addict, hasn't been so lucky -- she's still playing the game every day, often dipping into her bank account to pay the company a fee for nonstop play time."I just spent $9.99 last night for extra lives in the candy bank at like midnight," she said. "I have a full-blown obsession.""I've easily spent at least $200," she added.While Internet addiction is not a psychological condition yet acknowledged in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, experts say the behavior often fits the definition of an addiction -- a dependence that interferes with carrying out a normal life.Kimberly Young, a psychologist who studies obsessive Internet use, said it's usually women who get addicted to Candy Crush.Gamers will know they are addicted if they start ignoring responsibilities like picking the kids up from school or missing deadlines at work, or if they try to hide their habit from worried friends and family, she said."And it's not just Candy Crush," Young added. "It was Farmville for a while. ...There's all these games. They become a kind of escape mechanism for a lot of people."To kick the habit, Young said people should ask themselves if the game is interfering with their typical life and relationships, and if so, delete it immediately. If that's easier said than done, consider talking to an expert, she added.Psychologist Jenny Taitz agreed, adding that addicts can suffer from long-term stress, potential sleep loss and a diminished sense of accomplishment, especially if gamers are ditching responsibilities to plug in."I've never met someone who says, 'I feel really great about myself, I just reached an all-time high on Candy Crush'" she said.

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Parents Not So Gung-Ho About Their Sons Playing Football

Parents Not So Gung-Ho About Their Sons Playing Football

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Football may be America’s most popular sport but a lot of parents aren’t so sure they want their kids playing the game, largely because of a growing fear about head injuries.The RAND Corporation wanted to know how parents really felt about football and their children, particularly with all the publicity surrounding the NFL and former players suing the league for damages because of concussions they sustained during their career.Fifty-five percent of parents said they had no qualms about their sons playing football, which was far below the average of 90 percent for virtually all other high school sports.The RAND researchers also got some personal information about the parents to see how that might influence their decision.Interestingly, people who voted for Mitt Romney in 2012 were twice as likely to allows their kids to play football than Obama voters.As for education, parents who earned a college degree were 46 percent less likely to feel comfortable about their sons competing on the gridiron than adults who didn’t get a college diploma.

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People Listen to Sad Songs to Make Themselves Feel Better

People Listen to Sad Songs to Make Themselves Feel Better

iStock/Thinkstock(BERLIN) — What did Elton John mean when he sang “Sad Songs Say So Much”? Perhaps he was trying to explain that rather than making people feel worse, sad songs can actually improve your mood.That’s the crux of a new study by researchers from the Free University of Berlin, namely that music with melancholy lyrics and melody help people get through times of pain and loneliness.According to the researchers, sad songs, unlike their more upbeat counterparts, evoke a series of complex emotions including nostalgia, peacefulness and tenderness, which regulates negative moods and leads to pleasurable effects enabling the listener to better express his or her emotions.The researchers did add that sad music is appreciated more by “individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability.”

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Highlighters Are Pretty Much Good for Nothing

Highlighters Are Pretty Much Good for Nothing

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Ah, the highlighter. It was one of the many tools we used in class or home to help us better understanding our studies.However, New York Times science reporter Benedict Carey contends that we were probably just fooling ourselves when we highlighted passages in yellow, pink or green because it didn’t really make us learn any better.In his new book, How We Learn, Carey says the real key to absorbing our studies is by showing our brain what’s important and then repeatedly using and testing the information at hand.Highlighting, however, is useless because it requires no mental effort, according to Carey, and the brain isn’t taught that the information is important.A much better method of learning are the flashcards because they force the memory to recall something, which necessitates a form of mental straining. It’s not pleasant but it is effective.

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Relationships Formed by Cheating Usually Flop

Relationships Formed by Cheating Usually Flop

iStock/Thinkstock(MOBILE, Ala.) — A guy meets a girl who's going out with another guy, who she then cheats on. Pretty soon, the first guy steals the girl away and they become a couple.It’s a process called mate poaching and it happens quite often. The only problem, according to University of South Alabama researcher John Foster, is that couples formed in this fashion usually fall apart.In a series of interviews with both men and women who've been in relationships, Foster found that as many as 30 percent of couples were formed by cheating.More often than not, the partner stolen away from another relationship said they were more dissatisfied than people in relationships where no cheating was involved.Furthermore, the so-called “poached partner” also reported less commitment and less investment in their present lover.As previous studies have showed, Foster says that cheaters are more likely to cheat again, which normally spells doom for any relationship.

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Non-Medically Necessary C-Section Births Less Common

Non-Medically Necessary C-Section Births Less Common

Kmonroe2/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that non-medically necessary cesarean section deliveries are on the decline.According to data from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, the rate of C-section births among single babies at 37 or more weeks who are positioned head first has been sliding downwards since 2009. Researchers say that the pace of decline in non-medically necessary C-sections is more rapid than the decline in overall C-sections.C-section deliveries are often more expensive, require a longer recovery time and make it less likely that any subsequent children the woman births will be delivered vaginally. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has made an effort to reduce the number of unnecessary C-sections, noting that as many as 30 percent of all births occur via C-section. The rate of C-section deliveries in 2013 was measured at 26.9 percent.

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Colorectal Cancer May Be Increasing Among Young Adults

Colorectal Cancer May Be Increasing Among Young Adults

AlexRaths/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Researchers say that the rate of colorectal cancer has been on the decline for the last 30 years -- except in young adults.In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Surgery, researchers found that in Americans aged 20 to 34, the rates of colon and rectal cancers have been increasing. They suggested a number of possible explanations for the increase, including higher rates of obesity and physical inactivity and the Western diet -- all of which are known risk factors for colorectal cancer.The study notes that the number of young adults who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually is still small, but that the figure is expected to double within the next 15 years. Researchers say the study could have major implications for cancer screening recommendations, which are currently recommended to start at age 50.

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DEA Collected Over 600,000 Pounds of Prescription Drugs at September Take-Back Event

DEA Collected Over 600,000 Pounds of Prescription Drugs at September Take-Back Event

Roel Smart/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The most recent Drug Enforcement Agency take-back event, held on Sept. 27, saw more than 600,000 pounds of unwanted prescription drugs turned in.The DEA partnered with national, tribal and community law enforcement to take back unwanted prescription drugs at 5,495 sites. In total, 617,150 pounds of drugs were collected. The DEA says its four-year total -- including nine take-back events -- is about 4,823,251 pounds.Unused prescription drugs "create a public health and safety concern," the DEA said. Accidental ingestion, theft, misuse or abuse can lead to injury or death. In 2011, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 22,134 Americans died from prescription drug overdoses.

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Ebola-Infected NYC Doctor Strums Guitar to Pass Time in Isolation

Ebola-Infected NYC Doctor Strums Guitar to Pass Time in Isolation

Craig Spencer/LinkedIn(NEW YORK) -- A New York doctor being treated for Ebola has found another way to pass the time in a hospital isolation ward: He's playing his guitar, city health officials say.Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, has been in isolation at Bellevue Hospital since being diagnosed with Ebola last month. He’s now listed in stable condition.Spencer is spending his time in the hospital strumming on his guitar and riding a stationary bike as he recovers, the officials told ABC News.Spencer asked his medical care team whether someone could pick up the instrument from his apartment, where his fiancee, Morgan Dixon, remains under mandatory quarantine until Nov. 14. Spencer's medical team agreed, and the guitar was delivered to Spencer's hospital room, the officials said.The New York-based emergency room doctor had been treating Ebola patients at a Doctors Without Borders medical center in Guinea before he was infected.

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Cancer Patient Wants Brittany Maynard’s Option to Die with Dignity

Cancer Patient Wants Brittany Maynard’s Option to Die with Dignity

Jennifer Glass(NEW YORK) -- Writer Jennifer Glass has been living with advanced lung cancer for two years and has just a 5 percent chance of surviving past the next five years.Glass, 51, hopes that within the next few years her home state of California will change its laws to allow a "death with dignity" option similar to the right invoked this past weekend by Brittany Maynard, who ended her life in Oregon before experiencing the worst effects of her terminal brain tumor. Maynard had to move from California to Oregon to be able to legally get the help she needed to end her life.Glass’ life has not stopped after her 2012 diagnosis, which occurred just four months after she was married. She has been speaking and writing about her experiences in outlets such as Parade magazine in the hopes her story will help others in a similar situation.Earlier this year she posted a video of her transformation during a year of cancer treatments that went viral with over 300,000 views.One way Glass has also tried to change the conversation about living with cancer is by confronting her death and her options.“If cancer runs its course and it’s clear that it is, I’m going to die...The only control I have is how that happens and I want that control for myself,” Glass said.For the past year, Glass has worked with Compassion and Choices, the same non-profit organization that worked with Maynard as she approached the end of her life.Maynard made national headlines this year after announcing her decision to die on Nov. 1. Maynard, who was diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor, had moved from her home in northern California to Oregon in order to legally be prescribed medication to end her life.Maynard died on Saturday and her obituary posted at the Compassion and Choices website included her wish that she had the option to stay in California.“She moved to Oregon to pass away in a little yellow house she picked out in the beautiful city of Portland,” read the obituary. “She wished that her home State of California had also been able to provide terminally ill patients with the same choice. “Glass said she hopes she will not have to move like Maynard did.“I would be devastated if I have to leave my home just so I can die the way I want to,” said Glass.The intense public reaction to Maynard’s decision and her death has given Glass her hope that people will be open to learning about death with dignity legislation and be supportive of it in California.“I think it’s an issue who’s time has come,” said Glass. “We’re living in a time of unprecedented choice...We expect and demand all of these choices because they influence a quality of life. That has to include end of life.”After Maynard’s death, Glass hopes that she and others at Compassion and Cares will be able to push through California legislation that will allow them the same option Maynard had in Oregon.Toni Broaddus, California campaign director for Compassion & Choices, said the organization had a five-year campaign plan for the state that he hopes will end with terminally ill patients legally being able to obtain a prescription of a life-ending drug from a doctor.With Maynard’s story making headlines and people like Glass now speaking out, Broaddus hopes the original timeline might be condensed.“We’re really pushing the local strategy hard, looking at what else is possible that we didn’t think was possible for a few years,” Broaddus said.Glass said the five-year time line was particularly meaningful since a “three to five year window” is her likely prognosis.“I’m really focused and hopeful that if and when the time comes for me, I will have a legal option and not be forced about the potentially [leaving] my home,” she said.

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Bengals Player’s Cancer-Stricken Daughter to See Him Play for First Time

Bengals Player’s Cancer-Stricken Daughter to See Him Play for First Time

iStock/Thinkstock(CINCINNATI) -- After months of undergoing treatment for pediatric cancer, Cincinnati Bengals player Devon Still's daughter will get to watch her daddy play pro football in person for the first time on Thursday night.And the 4-year-old is hoping he'll do a robot dance."I got to do something for her," Still told ABC News' Cincinnati affiliate, WCPO, with a smirk. "You got to make a play. You can't just be out there dancing for no reason."Still, 25, a defensive tackle, had originally been cut from the Bengals roster, but once they learned his daughter had stage 4 cancer, they re-signed him to their practice squad. He's since been placed on the active roster.Leah is now feeling well enough to leave the Philadelphia hospital where she'd been getting treatment and attend the home game in Cincinnati.After the first quarter of the game, Leah is expected to be part of a ceremony in which the team presents a check to Cincinnati Children's Hospital for more than $1 million to go toward pediatric cancer research. The team raised money from sales of Still's jersey, No. 75, which sold out, according to the team's website."It's going to be emotional just knowing that she's there, especially with the check presentation that they're gonna do at the game," Still told WCPO.It will be a special night for the team, Bengals spokesman Jeff Berding said at a news conference."It's a little extra special because we have Leah Still in the house," Berding said. "There's been a tremendous amount of support from the community and across the country to support her and Devon Still and their fight against pediatric cancer."

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‘Stilettos by State’ Research Shows Who Wears Highest Heels

‘Stilettos by State’ Research Shows Who Wears Highest Heels

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When you think of New York women, very often a Carrie Bradshaw-type teetering around on too-high heels is an image that comes to mind. But had Sex and the City taken place in Arkansas, those heels might have been even higher.New research from fashion flash-sale site Gilt found the customers who purchased the highest heels don't live in New York at all. Or California, for that matter. The states that topped out in inches were Nevada, Arkansas, Florida and the territory of Puerto Rico. Heels sold to customers in those areas averaged 2.3 to 2.9 inches high.The lowest of heels wasn't quite as surprising. Nebraska, Kansas, Maine and Delaware all had an average well under 2 inches. Even Alaskans wear higher heels than that.According to Gilt's tech blog, the researchers also got curious about dress color. Did one area of the country wear a particular color more than another? Turns out dress color isn't nearly as varied as heel height.

They "found out that black is, um, still the 'new black' in every corner of the country."

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“Scandal” Star Kerry Washington Reveals Her Post-Baby Fitness Regimen

“Scandal” Star Kerry Washington Reveals Her Post-Baby Fitness Regimen

ABC/Randy Holmes(NEW YORK) — Kerry Washington and her husband Nnamdi Asomugha welcomed daughter Isabelle in April, but the Scandal actress looks amazing just months after giving birth.The 37-year-old spoke to BET's 106 & Park and revealed the healthy approach she's been taking to getting back in shape."I've always been a person who really approaches health in a proactive way. I work out, I eat right, so those were things I continued to do once the doctor said I could," she said. "But not to be crazy about it. I'm breastfeeding, so I can't starve myself."She continued, "It's important for me to be a good mom and a good actor."This is one of the rare times Washington has spoken about her little girl and her personal life.In August, she appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live and revealed why she chose the name Isabelle. "I heard your baby's named after her grandmother?" Washington asked Kimmel. "Mine is too, named after my grandmother."

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