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Alzheimer’s Drug Trials Lag As Number of Patients Rises

Alzheimer’s Drug Trials Lag As Number of Patients Rises

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Research conducted at the Cleveland Clinic found that while the number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease continues to rise — expected to reach over 100 million by 2050 — there were only 413 Alzheimer’s disease drug trials between 2002 and 2012.During the same time period, there were nearly 5,000 clinical trials for breast cancer drugs. It’s a shocking gap, considering that approximately 50,000 deaths each year in the U.S. can be attributed to Alzheimer’s disease — more than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined, the report, published in the journal Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy, said. Currently, there are just five drugs approved for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The failure rate of drugs tested against Alzheimer’s is a staggering 99.6 percent.
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Challenges Mount for Doctors Fighting Deadly Ebola Outbreak

Challenges Mount for Doctors Fighting Deadly Ebola Outbreak

Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The World Health Organization said Wednesday that it is struggling to contain an unprecedented outbreak of the Ebola virus on the continent of Africa.The contagious and deadly disease is spreading, in part because of trade, across the borders of three countries: Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, health officials said.In the outbreak zone, though, a new fear was growing: that some frightened patients are staying away from hospitals and sheltering at home or in churches, further spreading the disease.Since March, the outbreak has killed at least 390 of the more than 600 people it has infected in the three countries, according to WHO.There is no known cure for Ebola. In this outbreak — the largest for the Ebola virus — 62 percent of infected people have died.Ebola spreads by close contact with the bodily fluids of infected people.The virus is characterized by a sudden fever, intense weakness, vomiting, diarrhea and impaired kidney and liver function. In severe cases, it can cause internal bleeding.
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Woman Bares Colostomy Bag in Bikini Pic, Becomes Internet Sensation

Woman Bares Colostomy Bag in Bikini Pic, Becomes Internet Sensation

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Bethany Townsend decided to post some snapshots of herself in a bikini, bravely exposing her colostomy bags for the first time. And now they’ve gone viral.The photos of the 23-year-old English makeup artist, who suffers from Crohn’s disease, have been viewed by more than nine million people, according to Caters News.Townsend said the overwhelmingly positive response to her pictures has inspired her to pursue a career in modeling.”I didn’t expect this kind of reaction at all,” Townsend told Caters. “The photo has been seen by millions of people and it’s had 190,000 likes and over 10,000 comments on Facebook – it’s just gone ballistic.”According to the National Institutes of Health, Crohn’s disease is a condition that causes inflammation, or swelling, and irritation of any part of the digestive tract. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea and rectal bleeding.In extreme situations like Townsend’s, it becomes necessary to remove the damaged section of the intestine and fit the patient with a colostomy bag to divert feces away from the damage.Townsend said she was fitted with the bags four years ago after a series of operations failed to help her symptoms. She decided to show the bags off on Facebook and Instagram after seeing a few other women doing the same, according to Caters. She then sent them to the Crohn’s and Colitis UK Facebook group, which posted them on their page.”I sent them the picture and my information, and it all blew up from there,” Townsend said.
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Disability Does Not Justify Pistorius Shooting, Groups Say

Disability Does Not Justify Pistorius Shooting, Groups Say

Jemal Countess/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A defense witness in the Oscar Pistorius murder trial said people with disabilities are more likely to have symptoms of anxiety and “exaggerated fight or flight” responses, but disability rights groups aren’t buying it as an excuse for the shooting death of his girlfriend.“Frankly, I think there’s a little bit of exploitation of his physical disability to say that it’s linked to some mental health issue that would cause him to commit murder,” said the president of the National Organization on Disabilities, Carol Glazer. “It’s just too much of a stretch.”Pistorius, a 27-year-old South African Olympian known as the “Blade Runner” for his prosthetic legs, is on trial for shooting his model girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp through a locked bathroom door on Valentine’s Day 2013. He claims he mistook her for a burglar.Wayne Derman, who was the chief medical officer for the South African Paralympic team when Pistorius competed in 2012, said in court Wednesday that he has seen “exaggerated fight or flight” responses in people with disabilities that he hasn’t seen in able-bodied people.He described Pistorius as “hyper-vigilant,” which he described as “restless, looking around and a constant scanning of potential threats.” He said Pistorius cowered and held his ears when fireworks went off during the opening and closing ceremonies.Derman cited his own unpublished research that found athletes with disabilities experienced higher levels of anxiety than other athletes at competitions. A similar study showed no or only a slight difference between athletes with disabilities and athletes without disabilities.Derman also testified that people with disabilities are more likely to be attacked than able-bodied people, stopping short of suggesting that this may have contributed to Pistorius’ mind-set at the time of the shooting.Disability groups in the United States say they find it hard to believe Pistorius’ disability could be to blame for the shooting.Glazer of the National Organization on Disabilities said there tends to be a “knee-jerk” reaction to assume that becoming disabled is “the most traumatic experience on Earth,” but it’s not true because people adapt.Pistorius’ legs were amputated when he was an infant.“Anyone who can figure out how to win an able-bodied track medal in the World Championships, participate in the able-bodied Olympics, and then win a gold in the Paralympics, has figured out how to adapt to his disability,” Glazer said. “It’s highly unlikely that the same disability would trigger hyper-vigilance or other stress reactions.”Henry Claypoll, the executive vice president of the American Association of People with Disabilities, said it’s true that people react differently to their disabilities and experience discrimination. But he, too, has a hard time reaching Derman’s conclusion.“The bottom line is I don’t think you can justify these actions by his having lived with a disability,” Claypoll said.Dr. Phillip Resnick, who directs forensic psychology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, said Derman’s testimony is reminiscent of the battered woman defense, in which a woman kills her husband as a result of repeated abuse and the fear that if she doesn’t kill him, he’ll kill her first.Derman’s testimony follows a month-long psychological evaluation which concluded that Pistorius now has post-traumatic stress disorder. However, the panel’s report dismissed generalized anxiety disorder as a contributing factor that led to the shooting.A psychiatric witness prompted the psych evaluation by testifying in May that Pistorius suffered a lifelong anxiety disorder as a result of dealing with his amputations.
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Face and Hand Transplants Get Official Policy

Face and Hand Transplants Get Official Policy

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There are now official rules that govern face and hand transplants, but that doesn’t mean having the words “organ donor” on your driver’s license will automatically sign you up.The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, the nonprofit organization under contract with the federal government to allocate organs, has been facilitating face and hand transplants for years. But without a formal policy in place, the process has been difficult, according to Dr. Sue McDiarmid, who chairs the organization’s Vascularized Composite Allograft Transplantation Committee.The new rules, which go into effect July 3, will treat face and hand transplants like other organ transplants in the hopes of streamlining the process and boosting the number of procedures nationwide.“There are more of these procedures being done in the United States,” McDiarmid said, explaining the need for an official policy that clarifies the consent process. Now, “if there appears to be a potential donor that is interested or has stated ahead of time that they specifically would be interested in donating…we can go forward with that.”
Registering to be an organ donor is not enough to constitute consent for this kind of donation, McDiarmid said. If a an organ donor wants to donate their hands or face, that donor or their next of kin must give “explicit consent” to do so. Since organ donor registries are run by individual states, those states may develop mechanisms for getting this additional consent in the future.Like any other organ donation, the face and hands must be harvested immediately. But experts have come up with ways to honor a family’s wish to have an open casket, McDiarmid said. For face donors, a mold can be used to create a mask for funeral proceedings, and a prosthetic hand can be used for hand transplant donors.Since the first face transplant in 2008, there have been at least seven face transplants nationwide, McDiarmid said. And since the first hand transplant in 1999, there have been eight double hand transplants and 14 single hand transplants, she said.Face transplant recipients in the United States have included Charla Nash, a Connecticut woman who was mauled by a Chimpanzee in 2009 and got her face transplant surgery in 2011. Another notable recipient was Carmen Blandin Tarleton, who underwent a face transplant in February 2013, six years after her estranged husband attacked her with lye, blinding her and leaving her disfigured.”The donor and her family have given me a tremendous gift making a significant difference in my quality of life at the daily level,” Tarleton said a few months after her transplant. “They graciously relieved a significant amount of my physical pain and discomfort.”
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Popular Diet Blogger Reveals Eating Disorder to Her Followers

Popular Diet Blogger Reveals Eating Disorder to Her Followers

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — For Jordan Younger, going vegan began with a simple goal — to get healthy.Little did she know her blog, “The Blonde Vegan,” chronicling her food choices, would soon amass a huge fan base with more than 70,000 followers on Instagram.However, an even bigger surprise came when after just a year of living and touting that vegan lifestyle, Younger, 23, says things went sour.“I would just stand in front of the refrigerator for 20 minutes totally panicking that I wasn’t going to be eating the right thing for my body,” she told ABC News. “I was a slave to food.”Confessing in a blog post titled, “Why I’m Transitioning Away from Veganism,” Younger, of New York City, explained she had developed orthorexia, an obsession with eating righteously.  “A lot of people haven’t heard of orthorexia, which is not surprising to me at all,” she said.Younger said she restricted her own diet so much that she developed a strange rash, grew weak and even stopped having her period.“I started realizing that I had vitamin deficiency,” she explained. “I was malnourished. … I was very much restricting myself through the shield of veganism.”But after coming forward, Younger was shocked to be bombarded with negative comments from people saying that she wasn’t a true vegan and much worse.“I got death threats, I did,” she said. “But on the opposite side of the spectrum I just had so much support from so many people.”Now, Younger has changed her diet, adding fish and eggs. She’s also changed her Instagram name, from vegan to veggie, focusing now on a new direction and a new venture — her clothing line.“The new message is all about balance,” she said. “Do whatever you’re doing in moderation.”
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Excessive Reading May Spur Nearsightedness

Excessive Reading May Spur Nearsightedness

iStock/Thinkstock(MAINZ, Germany) — For years, educators have bemoaned the fact that youngsters aren’t reading enough.Now, it turns out that those who read a lot may be inadvertently damaging their eyesight, according to a study out of the University Medical Center in Mainz, Germany.Furthermore, the more education a student has, the greater the likelihood of developing myopia, more commonly known as nearsightedness.In a study of people ages 35 to 74, a quarter who only gained a high school degree reported being nearsighted, while more than half of university graduates were diagnosed with myopia.Lead author Alireza Mirshahi says the lesson here is not to give up the pursuit of a higher education or stop reading, but to take a break and get outside more often.That also pertains to people in the U.S., where nearsightedness affects 42 percent of the population.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Smartphones Are Indispensable to Many Americans

Smartphones Are Indispensable to Many Americans

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) — Smartphones haven’t been around all that long, but they’re almost as important to people as an arm or a leg. Maybe even more so if the findings of a new poll are to be believed.On behalf of Bank of America, researchers at the Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California-Annenberg and Bovitz Inc. asked 1,000 adults in the U.S. if they could last a day without their smartphone and 47 percent replied no, they could not. Overall, 91 percent of respondents said their cellphone is as important to them as their car and a toothbrush.Millennials are clearly the most devoted, with most saying they’d just as soon do without a toothbrush or deodorant than be deprived of their digital device.And what would Americans be willing to do if they lost access to their smartphones? Four out of five say they’d give up alcohol or chocolate if that’s what it took to stay connected. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

It’s Not Rude to Sleep in the Nude

It’s Not Rude to Sleep in the Nude

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Take it off, take it all off before you go to bed. Your partner will probably thank you for it.At least that’s the finding of a Cotton USA survey to learn what people wore under the sheets and how it affects their relationships.In the survey of 1,000 British adults, 55 percent of those who slept in the nude reported feeling happy in their relationships. That’s compared to 48 percent of people who don pajamas and 43 percent who like to put on nighties.What’s more, it’s folks ages 55 and older who are more likely to strip down to nothing before bedtime.Meanwhile, the survey also measured what irritates people in the bedroom. The most popular answers were stealing the covers, eating in bed, letting pets on the bed, leaving the bed unmade and tossing clothes on the floor.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

How to Hide Dreaded Garlic Breath

How to Hide Dreaded Garlic Breath

Hemera/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — An apple a day keeps garlic breath away. Or at the very least, it will help to neutralize the odor that comes from eating garlicky foods, according to Ohio State University researchers.They sought to determine what works best at tamping down dreaded garlic breath, which is created by sulfides contained in garlic.Participants were first fed raw garlic and then given various foods and liquids. Apples worked well because of oxidating enzymes that cover up the smell of sulfides.Meanwhile, lemon juice, milk and green tea also proved effective in reducing garlic breath. The researchers added that the best way to reduce the odor is to consume the various neutralizers while eating a dish with garlic.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Study: Sexting Linked to Early Sexual Activity in Young Children

Study: Sexting Linked to Early Sexual Activity in Young Children

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Parents of children as young as 10 may need to be concerned about their kids texting habits, after a new study found that students in the Los Angeles School District (LASD) — even those years away from being teenagers — may be getting into “sexting.”According to the study, published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers surveyed nearly 1,300 students in the LASD and found that not only were younger students involved in sexting, but that those who were were also significantly more likely to be sexually active than those not engaged in sexting.
Early sexual behavior has previously been linked to higher risk of sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, and other health risks.While many parents are giving their children cellphones to help maintain contact in case of an emergency, researchers say all parents should be sure to talk to their children about the right way to use the devices. Researchers also say that pediatricians should counsel teens on early sexual activity during office visits, and schools should consider the inclusion of the risks of sexting in their curricula.
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CDC: Opioid Prescription Painkiller Deaths Down

CDC: Opioid Prescription Painkiller Deaths Down

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A report issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday found the overall number of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. dropped by nearly 17 percent from 2010 to 2012 — from 3,201 deaths to 2,666. The rate of death per 100,000 persons also dropped from 17 to 14.
Even more stark is the drop in death rates caused by prescription drugs, falling 23.2 percent from 14.5 deaths per 100,000 persons to 11.1 deaths per 100,000.
The agency’s report was based on prescribing data from retail pharmacies across the country.CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden attributed the improved numbers to tougher regulations on pain clinics and health care providers, saying that the higher figures seen just a few years back were caused by “poor prescribing practices.”
The CDC also found noticeably higher rates of opioid painkiller prescriptions in southern states like Alabama, Tennessee and West Virginia than in most of the rest of the country.It appears that prescriptions for such painkillers is largely dependant on where you live, as there was a wide gap between the highest prescribing state, Alabama, and the lowest, Hawaii. nearly three times as many such prescriptions were written in Alabama in 2012 as there were in Hawaii.
Despite the drop in painkiller deaths, the CDC says more can be done. Namely, states should consider ways to increase monitoring programs for prescription drugs, potential legislation to reduce risky prescribing practices, state self-evaluation and expansion of first responder access to naloxone, the heroin overdose drug that was made available to emergency personnel in New York City earlier this year.
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Serena Williams Blames ‘Bug’ for Strange Symptoms

Serena Williams Blames ‘Bug’ for Strange Symptoms

Andy Lyons/Getty Images(LONDON) — Serena Williams said she’s “heartbroken” to leave Wimbledon and blamed a “bug” for the strange symptoms that caused her to forfeit her doubles match on Tuesday.The 32-year-old tennis star, who won the U.S. Open last fall, was forced to forfeit the match after struggling to bounce, catch and serve the ball.Wimbledon tweeted that Williams was “suffering from a viral illness” as she left the court hand-in-hand with her sister, Venus.“I thought I could rally this morning, because I really wanted to compete, but this bug just got the best of me,” Serena Williams said in a statement.Experts called the behavior “very unusual.”“I’ve seen her play before,” said Dr. Dr. George Kikano, who practices family medicine at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland and has not treated Williams. “She is a master on the court. She does not miss a ball. She does not miss a beat. She does not miss a serve. This is very unusual for her.”Kikano said Williams appeared to be confused, which could be a sign of dehydration caused by a virus, bacteria or the environment. She could also have been experiencing side effects from some kind of medication or she might have just been exhausted.Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, said Williams didn’t appear to be suffering from a neurological virus because she was still able to walk on her own. He echoed Kikano’s theory that dehydration could have been to blame.“That could be a consequence of any number of viral illnesses,” he said. “It’s still too vague to comment on unless they give us more details.”Williams had another health scare in 2011 when she suffered a blood clot in her lungs following a foot injury and surgery.
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How Ramadan Fasting Could Affect World Cup Players

How Ramadan Fasting Could Affect World Cup Players

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Tuesday’s World Cup match between the U.S. and Belgium could be particularly grueling for players who are fasting from dawn until dusk for the holy month of Ramadan.There a four Muslim players on the Belgian team. And while starter Marouane Fellaini has said he’s not fasting during the tournament, it’s unclear whether his three Muslim teammates will be playing the afternoon game after eight hours with no food or water.Asma Aloui, a researcher in exercise physiology with the National Center of Medicine and Science in Sport at the Tunisian Research Laboratory, said there are six ways fasting could influence their game:It Can Impact Sleep
Studies on fasting and sleeping during Ramadan are rare, but Aloui’s research suggests eating only after sundown may cause players to toss and turn in bed by disrupting their internal clocks. Although the study didn’t make any conclusions about the effect of these sleep changes on sports performance, it did demonstrate that during the holy month, players went to bed later and slept less overall. Naps would help make up any sleep deficits, Aloui said.It Can Slow Thinking
Aloui’s group found that people who fast during Ramadan experience less anxiety and depression. However, the same study found that fasting slows cognitive ability, which means players might have some trouble thinking quickly on their feet. Brain fog tends to increase towards the late afternoon, Aloui’s studies found, which does not bode well for the Belgian players on Tuesday.It Can Cause Dehydration
Aloui’s research suggests that Brazil’s blazing heat may be a problem for players who aren’t able to guzzle water to replace fluids lost from sweat. Parched players are at increased risk of muscle cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Sweating off just 2 percent of your body weight leads to decreased blood volume, rapid heart rate and difficulty regulating body temperature, Aloui has found. It can also cause an electrolyte imbalance, further impairing performance.It Can Affect Overall Performance
The combination of hunger and dehydration could affect multiple aspects of a player’s game, Aloui said. Her research has found that some players experienced diminished hand-eye coordination, quicker muscle fatigue and reduced power, speed and agility under the strain of fasting.Timing Matters
When Ramadan occurs during the summer, it presents a real challenge for players who might be fasting for as long as 18 hours, Aloui said. And the effects of fasting accumulate over the course of the day, so players slotted for evening games could have it tougher than those who play first thing in the morning, she said.Gradual Adjustment Is Best
The longer a player remains in the tournament, the more his body will adapt, Aloui said. One study of 85 professional Tanzanian soccer players showed that over the course of the month, athletic performance gradually improved to pre-Ramadan levels for athletes who continued training at high levels.
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Always Redefines What It Means to Run ‘Like a Girl’

Always Redefines What It Means to Run ‘Like a Girl’

Always(NEW YORK) — If you tell Lauren Greenfield that she runs or fights or talks “like a girl,” she’ll probably say thank you. After all, she is responsible for the fact that over 13 million people are now reconsidering what that phrase really means.Commissioned by Always to investigate society’s negative connotations with the expression, the director, who brought audiences 2012′s Queen of Versailles, produced an ad campaign that has sparked a national conversation on female empowerment and self-esteem.The result is a social media movement that aims to redefine what it means to do something “like a girl.”The campaign finds Greenfield on set and asking men, women and boys to act out running, fighting and hitting “like a girl.” The caricatured responses reinforce a stereotype that says girls are weaker and less determined than boys are.When Greenfield prompts young girls to demonstrate the same actions, reactions are breathtaking.Greenfield told ABC News that she was “really proud to be part of” the project.”One of the things that Always was interested in looking into is how girls deal with the confidence crisis that happens around puberty. Everyone knows that ‘crying like a girl’ or ‘running like a girl’ isn’t a compliment, but no one takes the off-the-cuff remark too seriously or considers its damage,” she said.Reflecting on the emotional impact the video has had on men and women across the country, Greenfield emphasized her own reaction to the video.”We had no idea what people would do when asked these questions,” Greenfield said. “It was amazing and moving and surprising to hear their responses. …It made us realize how deep and ingrained the stereotypes were, but also people’s desire to change them. Consciousness about what we take for granted is the first step to change and I hope this spotlight on what is thought of as a trivial remark will create a more empowering conversation for the next generation.”Always hopes to keep the conversation going and reclaim the maligned expression in the process. The Proctor and Gamble brand is inviting girls and women around the world to share what they do #LikeaGirl.”‘Like a Girl’ should never be used as an insult,” Greenfield said. “It means being strong, talented and downright amazing.”

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Migraine Headaches Are Painful for All Family Members

Migraine Headaches Are Painful for All Family Members

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Migraine headaches are not just debilitating to sufferers but to the people around them as well, according to research from New York City’s Montefiore Headache Center.Study author Dawn Buse was already familiar with the toll migraines take within a family through first-hand accounts but decided to quantify just how devastating the effects can be.With help from a survey company, Buse and her team did research on 1,000 people, about 80 percent of them women, who complained of chronic migraines that last at least 15 days a month.After migraine sufferers, their spouses and children filled out a questionnaire, three quarters of those with headaches said they would be better spouses and six in ten believe they’d be better parents if they were migraine-free in both instances.Another major finding: people with chronic migraines admit they are more easily annoyed and miss out on families activities, including vacations, because of the condition.Buse says the study shows that migraines, “are burdensome and difficult, not only for the people who live with it but also for the people they love.”Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Possible Signs of Autism Show Up in Fetus

Possible Signs of Autism Show Up in Fetus

Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(EDINBURGH, Scotland) — In what appears to be a major breakthrough in the early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, researchers at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland have found certain fetal defects in ultrasound scans that may help lead to better education about ASD.Specifically, children with brains and bodies that seemed to be growing more rapidly than their peers during the start of the second trimester went on to develop autism at about the 20th week.Lead researcher Lois Salter says that typically symptoms turn up at age three or four, although newer studies show it can be detected during infancy.However, Salter and her colleagues have been searching for fetal defects since late 2008 in an attempt to link larger brains and bodies with the likelihood of developing ASD.More research will be necessary since the study has only 160 children, about a fourth of whom were later diagnosed with autism.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Heart Monitors May Prevent Future Strokes

Heart Monitors May Prevent Future Strokes

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — Strokes are both frightening and frustrating, often resulting in problems with speech and cognition and sometimes, paralysis.Adding to the frustration is that about 40 percent of stroke victims never find out what exactly caused the stroke and after leaving the hospital, they’re often unsure about what therapy to pursue.However, Dr. Rod Passman, a cardiologist at Northwestern University, says more physicians have been equipping stroke patients with heart monitors that can detect one potential cause, that is, atrial fibrillation, which is a fast and irregular heartbeat.If a monitor discovers that atrial fibrillation is occurring, doctors can change prescriptions to put stroke victims on a better blood thinning medication in order to prevent blockages.This is especially important since those who’ve suffered strokes have a 500 percent chance of having another one if diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Dancing Can Help Seniors with Bad Knees and Hips

Dancing Can Help Seniors with Bad Knees and Hips

Photodisc/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) — To paraphrase an old Bee Gees song, “You should be dancing, yeah, if you’re a senior citizen.”Hitting the dance floor, albeit gently and slowly, will help to alleviate chronic knee and hip pain, according to a Saint Louis University study.What’s more, lead author Jean Krampe says that dancing also improves everyday walking of the elderly.Krampe conducted her study with three dozen seniors, average age of 80. who danced in two 45-minutes sessions weekly for 12 weeks. Virtually all the seniors were women and complained about arthritis that made their knees and hips stiff.Compared to a control group that did not participate, the dancers said they felt less pain in their knees and hips after the 12 weeks and found they were walking better as well.Perhaps even more significantly is that the control group increased their pain medications by 21 percent while those who took part in dance-based therapy reduced their meds by 39 percent.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Study Confirms Childhood Vaccines Are Safe

Study Confirms Childhood Vaccines Are Safe

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The latest study on the subject found, once again, that childhood vaccines are safe for children and are not linked to autism or other major health issues.According to the study, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, was part of a federally commissioned report which looked at previous research to determine that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) was not associated with onset of autism and that the vaccines for MMR, diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP), Tetanus diphtheria, Haemophilus influenza type b and hepatitis B were not associated with childhood leukemia. The study also went one step further than the 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine by filtering data for children under the age of six and adding findings related to additional vaccinations. In some cases, the latest study found that vaccination could result in non-serious side effects.
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