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Staying Home Becoming More of a Reality for Older Americans

Staying Home Becoming More of a Reality for Older Americans

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — If given the choice, most senior citizens would prefer to remain in their own homes even if they become disabled than having to reside in assisted-living or long-term care facilities.That preference is becoming more feasible, according to the 2013 survey by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging.In a poll of 618 local service providers, 70 percent say they offer programs to help the elderly stay at home, which is also referred to as "aging in place." Just six years ago, fewer than a third of providers offered this service.The federal government is cognizant that the older population will grow dramatically as more Baby Boomers pass the 65-year-old threshold.One way to help seniors continue a normal, independent way of life is the creation of supportive communities that assist them in their daily needs.Meanwhile, when an older person returns home from a hospital stay, local providers partner with private health-care companies and managed-care providers to ensure a home is safe from hazards in an effort to reduce the chances of falls.

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Is Mexico the Real Happiest Place on Earth?

Is Mexico the Real Happiest Place on Earth?Photodisc/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — How does the U.S. measure on a happiness scale compared to 42 other countries?Pretty well, according to a new Pew Research Center report, but still behind six other nations with economies considered advanced, em...

Brittany Maynard, Who Had Incurable Brain Cancer, Ends Her Life

Brittany Maynard, Who Had Incurable Brain Cancer, Ends Her Life

Design Pics/Thinkstock(PORTLAND, Ore.) — Terminally ill Portland, Oregon, resident Brittany Maynard, who became a symbol for the right-to-die movement, has ended her own life. She was 29.Diagnosed with an incurable form of brain cancer and given less than six months to live, Maynard moved to Oregon to take advantage of the state's physician-assisted suicide law.Maynard took lethal medication prescribed by a doctor and died late Saturday, "as she intended -- peacefully in her bedroom, in the arms of her loved ones," Sean Crowley, a Compassion & Choices spokesman, said in a statement."We're sad to announce the passing of a dear and wonderful woman, Brittany Maynard. She passed peacefully in her bed surrounded by close family and loved ones," Compassion & Choices, a non-profit that works to improve care and expand the choices for people at the end of their lives, said on its Facebook page.Over the past few months, Maynard and her husband, Dan Diaz, have used the time to complete the sick woman's bucket list that included visiting the Grand Canyon.Maynard has also had to deal with criticism from those who believed she had no right to end her life. However, she told People magazine last month, "For people to argue against this choice for sick people really seems evil to me. They try to mix it up with suicide and that’s really unfair, because there’s not a single part of me that wants to die. But I am dying."Maynard's final message on Facebook was as follows, "Goodbye to all my dear friends and family that I love. Today is the day I have chosen to pass away with dignity in the face of my terminal illness, this terrible brain cancer that has taken so much from me…but would have taken so much more. The world is a beautiful place, travel has been my greatest teacher, my close friends and folks are the greatest givers. I even have a ring of support around my bed as I type. ...Goodbye world. Spread good energy. Pay it forward!”

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Tips to ‘Fall Back’ From Daylight Saving Time 2014

Tips to ‘Fall Back’ From Daylight Saving Time 2014

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  What's better than sleeping in on a Sunday? How about dodging the days-long consequences of rolling the clocks back this weekend?Daylight Saving Time ends this weekend, which means that most residents in the country returned to Standard Time at 2 a.m. Sunday. To do so, most people set the clocks back one hour Saturday night, before they hit the hay. This does not apply to you if you live in most of Arizona or Hawaii, where it’s always island time.Sure, you'll gain an hour when Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday. But spending said hour in bed after sunrise will do you few favors in the long run, sleep experts say.

"It will hit you Sunday evening," said Dr. Yosef Krespi, director of the New York Head and Neck Institute's Center for Sleep Disorders. "But if your body clock is tuned to waking up with sunlight, you're going to benefit."The body clock is a cluster of neurons deep inside the brain that generates the circadian rhythm, also known as the sleep-wake cycle. The cycle spans roughly 24 hours, but it's not precise."It needs a signal every day to reset it," said Dr. Alfred Lewy, director of Oregon Health and Science University's Sleep and Mood Disorders Laboratory in Portland.The signal is sunlight, which shines in through the eyes and "corrects the cycle from approximately 24 hours to precisely 24 hours," said Lewy. But when the sleep-wake and light-dark cycles don't line up, people can feel out-of-sync, tired and grumpy.With time, the body clock adjusts on its own. But here are a few ways to help it along.1. Wake Up at a Normal Time Sunday MorningMany people see the extra hour as an excuse to stay up later and sleep in longer. But sleeping through the Sunday morning sunlight can leave you feeling out of sorts for the start of the week, according to Krespi.Instead, try to get up at the same time. Use the extra hour to go for a morning walk or make a hearty breakfast.2. Eat Well and ExerciseSpeaking of morning walks and breakfast, an active lifestyle and a healthy diet can work wonders for your sleep, according to Krespi. So grab your partner, your dog or your favorite playlist and get outside some fresh air and exercise. And dig into a breakfast packed with whole grains and protein to keep you energized through the 25-hour day.3. Get a Good Night's Sleep Sunday NightStill have extra time to kill Sunday? Use it to turn your bedroom into a full-fledged sleep zone."It has to be quiet, it has to be cool and it has to be dark," said Krespi. "Shut down your gadgets and turn away that alarm clock so you don't watch it tick."Try to hit the sack at your usual bedtime, even though it will be dark one hour earlier.4. Try a Low Dose of MelatoninWhile light synchronizes the body clock in the morning, the hormone melatonin updates it at night. The exact function of the hormone, produced by the pea-size pineal gland in the middle of the brain, is unclear. But it can activate melatonin receptors on the neurons of the body clock, acting as a "chemical signal for darkness," Lewy said.Taking a low dose of melatonin in the evening can help sync the sleep-wake and light-dark cycles. But be careful: Although melatonin is sold as a dietary supplement, it can cause drowsiness and interfere with other drugs. Talk to your doctor about the dosage and timing that's right for you.5. Know That Your Body Will Adjust

It might take a few days to feel 100 percent normal, but fear not: Your body will adjust to the new light-dark cycle.

"Some people suffer more, some people less, it all depends," said Krespi, adding that falling back in November tends to be easier than springing forward in March. "On Monday morning, we'll appreciate that we're waking up for work or school with sunlight."

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Florida Football Coach Rallies Team After Player’s Devastating Amputation

Florida Football Coach Rallies Team After Player’s Devastating Amputation

iStock/Thinkstock(TAMPA BAY, Fla.) -- A Florida high school football coach delivered a rousing speech a week after one of his players had to have his leg amputated because of a football injury.

"The character that is in your heart. The blood that pumps through your veins," head coach Jeremy Frioud said in a speech to the Northeast Vikings before they played their first game since teammate Leshawn Williams was carried off the field with an injury that resulted in his leg being partially amputated.

"Make sure there's no chance that you ever take that road," Frioud said. "That you never are a coward. That you never step away from adversity.

As he spoke, Frious' new tattoo of Williams' jersey number could be seen in footage taken by ABC News affiliate WFTS-TV in Tampa Bay, Fla.

The Northeast Vikings played East Lake High School Friday night, and although the team lost 49-14, Frioud said he wouldn't have it any other way.

"I am so proud of you and how you have rebounded this week. How you have refused to make an excuse," he said.

After the game, East Lake High School gave Frioud a donation to help Williams with his medical costs.

Williams reportedly developed a blood clot as a result of the injury that forced doctors to amputate part of his leg.

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Dallas Ebola Survivor Reunited With Dog

Dallas Ebola Survivor Reunited With Dog

The Pham Family(DALLAS) -- Dallas nurse Nina Pham was reunited with her dog Bentley on Saturday, a week after she was declared Ebola-free and discharged from the National Institutes of Health's hospital in Maryland."I'm excited to take Bentley home," she said at a news conference, hugging and kissing the happy dog.The King Charles Cavalier Spaniel could not sit still during the news conference, barking and running across the green lawn, and once jumped into Phams' arms. The dog had been quarantined for the past 21 days out of fear that he too would contract Ebola.Bentley was presented with a basket full of toys and other gifts, donated by well-wishers from across the country.

Caregivers decided it was in Bentley's best interests for Pham not visit during his quarantine. If Bentley saw Pham and she left, he might become anxious or depressed, and have other health concerns, Dallas spokeswoman Sana Syed told ABC News.Bentley was held in isolation at Hensley Field in Dallas where he was treated by a team of veterinarians, according to Syed."They played with him and hugged him, really just gave him that attention he needed during this time," Syed told ABC News on Friday. "They dedicated so much time caring for Bentley to make sure he got loved during this isolation period."Pham was one of two nurses who contracted Ebola after treating Thomas Eric Duncan, a native of Liberia who was the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States and also the only person to die of the virus in the U.S.

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California Heart Surgeon’s Patient Is Doctor Who Delivered Him

California Heart Surgeon’s Patient Is Doctor Who Delivered Him

Dmitrii Kotin/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It was a near-full-circle moment for Dr. Jim Affleck, a retired obstetrician, when he went in for heart surgery last month at Sutter Memorial Hospital in Sacramento, California.One of the doctors in the operating room with Affleck was Dr. Robert Kincade, a heart surgeon whom Affleck delivered 45 years ago.Luckily for Affleck, he said, the uncanny coincidence was not a completely full-circle moment.“We didn’t have to come full circle on this delivery-death thing,” Affleck, 84, told ABC News Friday, adding that he “feels like a new person” after having his aortic valve replaced.Affleck spent 33 years as an obstetrician in the Sacramento area delivering thousands of babies -- so many that he says he lost count. So no one can blame him for not immediately recognizing that his patient was now his doctor.“I was surprised because, as an obstetrician, your patient is the mother,” he said. “You just hand the baby off to the pediatrician and never see it again.”Dr. Kincade is the medical director of the Sutter Transplant and Advanced Therapies Programs, located at Sutter Memorial Hospital, the same hospital where he was born and where Affleck practiced.When Kincade realized the coincidence, he called the best source possible to confirm who delivered him: his mom, according to Affleck and the hospital. The doctor, who could not be reached Friday by ABC News because he was in surgery, then confirmed again via his birth certificate that Affleck was his doctor.“I was surprised he would look at his birth certificate and remember that and his mother remembered it too,” Affleck said.Affleck, who lives just outside Sacramento with his wife, Dona, and has three kids of his own, called his recovery from the heart surgery “marvelous.”He had a chance to reunite with Kincade on Monday when he went back to the hospital for his final check-up.“We’ve stayed in touch,” Affleck said. “The day after the surgery I got up and I could just tell that everything was different.”

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Many High School Seniors in Favor of Marijuana Reform

Many High School Seniors in Favor of Marijuana Reform

CapturedNuance/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A survey of high school seniors found that most 18-year-olds want marijuana reform.According to the study, published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, nearly one-third of students surveyed felt marijuana should be entirely legal, and nearly that amount -- 28.5 percent -- felt that marijuana should be treated as a minor violation. The survey included 12,000 students between 2007 and 2011. Researchers did find that certain groups were more or less likely to support marijuana legalization. Among those more likely to be in favor of legalization were black, liberal and urban students, while women, conservatives, religious students and those with friends who disapprove of marijuana use were less likely to support legalization.Interestingly, the survey found, nearly 17 percent of those students who had never used marijuana before were in favor of legalization.

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Dallas Ebola Survivor Nina Pham to Reunite with Her Dog

Dallas Ebola Survivor Nina Pham to Reunite with Her Dog

Dallas Animal Services(DALLAS) -- Dallas nurse Nina Pham, who last week was declared Ebola-free and discharged from the National Institutes of Health's hospital in Maryland, will finally reunite with her dog, Bentley, who has been in quarantine for 21 days over fears that he, too, would develop the deadly virus."She's pretty excited," Dallas spokeswoman Sana Syed told ABC News. "We've been talking to her every day."Pham is expected to reunite with Bentley Saturday morning, give a short statement and accept a gift basket filled with donations from people around the country, Syed said.Pham, 26, contracted Ebola while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, a native of Libya who was the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States and also the only person to die of the disease in the U.S.Pham, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, was diagnosed with Ebola and isolated on Oct. 11. She was then transferred to the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, on Oct. 16 and discharged on Oct. 24.Bentley's quarantine won't be over until Nov. 1, so his veterinarians thought it best not to confuse Bentley with visits from Pham if he couldn't go home, Syed said. Caregivers feared if Bentley saw Pham and she left, he might become anxious or depressed, and have other health concerns."It's been a tough week for her, since she's been back and obviously wanted to see Bentley right away," Syed said, adding that Pham has maintained her distance.Over the last three weeks, the King Charles cavalier spaniel has been cared for by a crew of veterinarians in isolation at Hensley Field in Dallas, she said."They played with him and hugged him, really just gave him that attention he needed during this time," Syed said. "They dedicated so much time caring for Bentley to make sure he got loved during this isolation period."

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What Kaci Hickox Has to Say About Court’s Quarantine Decision

What Kaci Hickox Has to Say About Court’s Quarantine Decision

ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) -- A nurse who fought quarantine rules after returning from treating Ebola patients in West Africa said a court ruling in her favor will ensure that other health care workers returning from Africa are given "human treatment.""I am humbled today by the judge's decision and even more humbled by the support that we have received by the town of Fort Kent, the state of Maine, across the United States and even across the border," Hickox, 33, told reporters Friday from her home in Fort Kent.A judge in Maine ruled Friday that Hickox could leave her home and spend time in public spaces despite other state officials' attempts to force her into a mandatory quarantine until a 21-day potential Ebola incubation period ends.The judge noted in his ruling that although the state's fears may be irrational, they are real and Hickox should be mindful of them."I know Ebola is a scary disease," Hickox said Friday. "I have seen it face-to-face."Maine Gov. Paul LePage attempted to force Hickox to take a blood test for Ebola to prove she doesn't have the deadly virus. Hickox tested negative for Ebola twice in New Jersey after arriving at Newark International Airport, and experts have said a person must be symptomatic to test positive. Hickox has not shown any Ebola symptoms, she said.Hickox had been treating patients in Sierra Leone with Doctors Without Borders before she returned to the United States and landed New Jersey a week ago. Upon landing, she was questioned for six hours and quarantined in an isolation tent until she was allowed to drive up to Maine on Monday. In Maine, officials first suggested a voluntary quarantine and then sought to legally enforce it.But Hickox said she wouldn't comply because the quarantine rules weren't "scientifically valid." She said she fought the quarantine for all the other health workers expected to return from West Africa in the coming weeks.The Centers for Disease Control doesn't require quarantines for returning health workers who wear protective gear because they can't spread the virus unless they are symptomatic for Ebola and others come into contact with their bodily fluids.According to the judge's order, Hickox will need to agree to active monitoring and coordinate her travel with health authorities. She must also report any symptoms she experiences to public health authorities.Hickox said she plans to spend this evening eating her boyfriend’s cooking and watching a scary movie. She said she won’t be able to take trick-or-treaters because she hasn’t been able to buy candy.

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Look Inside Isolation Ward Where Nina Pham Was Treated for Ebola

Look Inside Isolation Ward Where Nina Pham Was Treated for Ebola

National Institutes of Health(BETHESDA, Md.) -- Simple beige walls and the Spartan furnishings is what Ebola patient Nina Pham lived with during the eight days she was treated at the isolation block of the National Institutes of Health.ABC News got a look inside the specially designed unit, one of only four facilities in the country specially designed to handle a contagion of Ebola’s level. This one was designed in 2010 to cope with the threat of outbreaks for diseases such as Influenza or SARS, and then adapted for Ebola.A small antechamber with negative air-pressure separates the corner room where Pham was treated from the rest of the block, known as the Special Clinical Studies Unit.NIH’s infectious disease director, Dr. Anthony Fauci, demonstrated the facility and complex biohazard suits used by its clinicians.It can take over 10 minutes to assemble the apparel known as PPE, for Personal Protective Equipment, and roughly a dozen separate pieces go into it. From multiple layers of the special repellant cloth known as Tyvek to wireless radio transmitters and a respirator, the dizzying process of donning and removing the gear -- known as doffing -- is designed to never expose the wearer to contaminated material.The procedure is so complex that a specially trained observer stands by to supervise with a lengthy checklist.“There are variations of this process,” Fauci said as two clinicians donned and doffed behind him. “So if some group doesn’t do it exactly like this it doesn’t mean it’s wrong. This is just best for us.”“This process is not an easy process. The one thing you want to be sure of is that you are at your most fatigued when taking off your material, when you are doffing. And that's when you are most vulnerable of being infected, so that's why you do it very, very carefully,” he said.Pham was released last week after eight days under supervision at the center. She was diagnosed on Oct. 11 after contracting the deadly virus in the process of treating Thomas Eric Duncan, the first to bring the disease to American soil, at a Dallas hospital. Duncan died from the virus.The disease, for which there is no proven antibiotic cure, has killed thousands since this year’s outbreak began in West Africa.

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Five Tips to ‘Fall Back’ from Daylight Saving Time 2014

Five Tips to ‘Fall Back’ from Daylight Saving Time 2014

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- What's better than sleeping in on a Sunday? How about dodging the days-long consequences of rolling the clocks back this weekend?Daylight Saving Time ends this weekend, which means that most residents in the country return to Standard Time at 2 a.m. Sunday. To do so, most people set the clocks back one hour Saturday night, before they hit the hay. This does not apply to you if you live in most of Arizona or Hawaii, where it’s always island time.Sure, you'll gain an hour when Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday. But spending said hour in bed after sunrise will do you few favors in the long run, sleep experts say."It will hit you Sunday evening," said Dr. Yosef Krespi, director of the New York Head and Neck Institute's Center for Sleep Disorders. "But if your body clock is tuned to waking up with sunlight, you're going to benefit."The body clock is a cluster of neurons deep inside the brain that generates the circadian rhythm, also known as the sleep-wake cycle. The cycle spans roughly 24 hours, but it's not precise."It needs a signal every day to reset it," said Dr. Alfred Lewy, director of Oregon Health and Science University's Sleep and Mood Disorders Laboratory in Portland.The signal is sunlight, which shines in through the eyes and "corrects the cycle from approximately 24 hours to precisely 24 hours," said Lewy. But when the sleep-wake and light-dark cycles don't line up, people can feel out-of-sync, tired and grumpy.With time, the body clock adjusts on its own. But here are a few ways to help it along:1. Wake Up at a Normal Time Sunday MorningMany people see the extra hour as an excuse to stay up later and sleep in longer. But sleeping through the Sunday morning sunlight can leave you feeling out of sorts for the start of the week, according to Krespi.Instead, try to get up at the same time. Use the extra hour to go for a morning walk or make a hearty breakfast.2. Eat Well and ExerciseSpeaking of morning walks and breakfast, an active lifestyle and a healthy diet can work wonders for your sleep, according to Krespi. So grab your partner, your dog or your favorite playlist and get outside some fresh air and exercise. And dig into a breakfast packed with whole grains and protein to keep you energized through the 25-hour day.3. Get a Good Night's Sleep Sunday NightStill have extra time to kill Sunday? Use it to turn your bedroom into a full-fledged sleep zone."It has to be quiet, it has to be cool and it has to be dark," said Krespi. "Shut down your gadgets and turn away that alarm clock so you don't watch it tick."Try to hit the sack at your usual bedtime, even though it will be dark one hour earlier.4. Try a Low Dose of MelatoninWhile light synchronizes the body clock in the morning, the hormone melatonin updates it at night. The exact function of the hormone, produced by the pea-size pineal gland in the middle of the brain, is unclear. But it can activate melatonin receptors on the neurons of the body clock, acting as a "chemical signal for darkness," Lewy said.Taking a low dose of melatonin in the evening can help sync the sleep-wake and light-dark cycles. But be careful: Although melatonin is sold as a dietary supplement, it can cause drowsiness and interfere with other drugs. Talk to your doctor about the dosage and timing that's right for you.5. Know That Your Body Will Adjust

It might take a few days to feel 100 percent normal, but fear not: Your body will adjust to the new light-dark cycle."Some people suffer more, some people less, it all depends," said Krespi, adding that falling back in November tends to be easier than springing forward in March. "On Monday morning, we'll appreciate that we're waking up for work or school with sunlight."

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Teal Pumpkins Indicate Food Allergy Awareness This Halloween

Teal Pumpkins Indicate Food Allergy Awareness This Halloween

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Of all the bizarre things kids and adults might see on Halloween are pumpkins painted the color of teal on people’s stoops.If that’s the case, the little ones expecting candy might be disappointed because it means that home is participating in “The Teal Pumpkin Project,” meaning no sweet treats.The project is described by a group calling itself Food Allergy Research and Education as promoting “safety, inclusion and respect of individuals managing food allergies -- and to keep Halloween a fun, positive experience for all.”While it’s certainly a very serious issue, the group isn’t out to ruin a festive occasion.Rather than hand out candy, FARE recommends that parents offer other fun stuff, including stickers, glow sticks or other knick-knacks that commemorate Halloween.

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How to Get College Credit for Wasting Time on the Internet

How to Get College Credit for Wasting Time on the Internet

iStock/Thinkstock(PITTSBURGH) — Wasting time on the Internet is an American obsession. It also happens to be the name of a course at the University of Pittsburgh taught by professor Kenneth Goldsmith.He says that the course is basically a rebuttal to the gloom- and doom-sayers who contend that all the time spent on the Internet doing basically nothing contributes to the dumbing-down of the nation.Yet, Goldsmith says nothing could be further from the truth and to prove his point, students who take “Wasting Time on the Internet,” which is required of creative writing majors, will have to spend three hours per class interacting through chat rooms, social media and other platforms.Their goal by the end of the session, according to the prof, is to find “substantial works of literature” online to show that it’s not such a waste of time after all.

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Working Moms Have It Tougher than You Think

Working Moms Have It Tougher than You Think

Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Many women who care for children while holding down a job are feeling overwhelmed by the stress of trying to balance both important responsibilities.In a survey of 1,000 working moms by care.com, which helps parents find and manage family care, women report working an average of 37 hours a week while spending another 80 hours on child care, household chores and other matters.According to the survey, more than a third say "they're always falling behind" while two-thirds "imagine that others are more together than they are."It's no wonder than that one in four working moms report that they cry alone at least once a week.  About 30 percent say they also get into a fight at least once a week with their partner or kids.In spite of these problems, three out ten working moms won't hire someone to help because they feel guilty about not being to handle things by themselves.

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Why Some Sports Fans Turn to Vandalism Even After a Win

Why Some Sports Fans Turn to Vandalism Even After a Win

Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Winners are generally more aggressive than the losers, according to at least one psychologist, so he was not surprised when celebrations turned violent in San Francisco after the Giants won the World Series Wednesday.“This is not uncommon after many major sporting events,” said Brad Bushman, a professor of communication and psychology at the Ohio State University School of Communication.People who feel they have “won” sometimes like to boast or celebrate that victory, he said, though the victory can end with their trying to diminish the loser in order to feel better.“Social identity theory shows that people like to take pride in the groups they belong to,” Bushman said. “But often people think to make themselves feel better they have to stomp down those who belong to other groups.”After the Giants won the World Series for the third time in five years, some of their fans took to the streets immediately after the game near the baseball stadium where the team plays to celebrate with cheers and in some cases property damage.Police in riot gear took to the streets and used tear gas to get fans to disperse.Forty people were arrested Wednesday night, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, which reported Thursday afternoon that police said three people were booked for alleged assault and two for illegal gun possession.Police said many of those arrested were from outside San Francisco.One local merchant, Kim Jung, 57, complained to the newspaper about the graffiti scrawled outside his diner. “I’m lucky there wasn’t any broken windows,” he said.Speaking of the vandalism, he asked, “Why is it like that?”Experts cite crowds as a contributing factor, saying anonymity allows people to feel like they can do something illegal or dangerous and not be caught."It’s a group contagion effect," said Stanley Teitelbaum, a psychologist and psychotherapist in New York. "When they’re part of a group, then they’re more prone and more likely to join in and let that aggressive side of themselves."Teitelbaum said an intense game, like the final game at the World Series, can result in people searching for a release through destructive behavior."Internally, people are psychologically and emotionally building up a lot of intensity and tension," he said. "It becomes an opportunity or an excuse to let all this out."Teitelbaum said people may start out thinking they're doing something minor, but that it can quickly spiral out of control."You start to rock a car and you don’t necessarily mean to get it turned over," Teitelbaum said. “You’re expressing an aggressive feeling."While a World Series win can lead to heightened emotions, they're not always positive, according to experts.Fredrick Koenig, former professor of social psychology at Tulane University in New Orleans, said for some people extreme happiness can turn into extreme aggression.“This is an aspect of crowd behavior and it’s called ‘excitation transfer’; one part of your brain gets excited and it transfers over to aggression,” Koenig told ABC News.Koenig said if the excitement transmits to aggression, being in a crowd with a lot of other like-minded people is not a good place to be."In crowds, the rules aren’t there anymore; [people] start doing things that are not normative," he said.

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How an Antifreeze Ingredient Led to a Whiskey Recall in Europe

How an Antifreeze Ingredient Led to a Whiskey Recall in EuropeJag_cz/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The overseas recall of a batch of U.S. whiskey imported to three Scandinavian countries has focused new attention on an ingredient that has long been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use i...

New York City ‘Actively Monitoring’ 117 People for Ebola

New York City ‘Actively Monitoring’ 117 People for Ebola

VILevi/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- New York City is monitoring 117 people for possible Ebola, most of them people who arrived on commercial flights from West Africa over the past 19 days.Those being monitored include people who cared for a New York doctor who tested positive for Ebola after treating patients in West Africa.The doctor, Craig Allen Spencer, was placed in an isolation unit last week at Bellevue Hospital after reporting Ebola-like symptoms."The list also includes Bellevue Hospital staff taking care of Dr. Spencer, FDNY EMS staff who transported Dr. Spencer to Bellevue, the lab workers who conducted Dr. Spencer’s blood test, and the three people who had direct contact with Dr. Spencer prior to his arrival at Bellevue and who are currently under city quarantine,” said Marti Adams, a spokesman for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said.Most of those monitored, however, were identified through stepped up screening protocols at John F. Kennedy International Airport, which began on Oct. 11."The vast majority of these individuals [being monitored] are travelers arriving in New York City since Oct. 11 from the three Ebola-affected countries who are being monitored post-arrival," Adams said.Spencer, 33, was treating Ebola patients in Guinea for Doctors Without Borders, according to the officials. Guinea is one of the West African countries currently battling an Ebola outbreak.Spencer is the fourth patient to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national, tested positive for the virus at the end of September in Dallas, where he infected two nurses who cared for him: Nina Pham and Amber Vinson.Duncan died on Oct. 8. Vinson and Pham have both been discharged and are Ebola-free.Spencer is the only remaining American Ebola patient still battling the virus in the United States. Bellevue Hospital released a statement on Thursday saying that he remains in serious but stable condition.

The hospital also noted that a 5-year-old child who tested negative for Ebola on Monday was discharged on Thursday.Spencer's diagnosis prompted several states to toughen their quarantine rules, leading to the controversy surrounding Ebola nurse Nancy Hickox, who is refusing to abide by voluntary quarantine rules in Maine.

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NY Program Would Encourage Health Care Workers to Travel to West Africa

NY Program Would Encourage Health Care Workers to Travel to West Africa

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As New York City hosts the nation's sole Ebola patient, city and state officials have announced a program to encourage health care professionals to travel to West Africa to treat Ebola patients.The initiative would be modeled on benefits and rights provided to military reservists.New York state and the city will work to ensure that health care workers who travel to West Africa would have their pay, health care and employment statuses continue seamlessly when they get back.“The depth of the challenge we face in containing Ebola requires us to meet this test in a comprehensive manner on multiple fronts, and part of that is encouraging and incentivizing medical personnel to go to West Africa," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement Friday.State officials would also provide necessary reimbursements to health care workers and their employers for any quarantine that are needed upon their return to New York.New York state is coordinating the program with New Jersey and the Greater New York Hospital Association.

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Maine Pizzeria Delivers Pie to Ebola Nurse

Maine Pizzeria Delivers Pie to Ebola Nurse

Creatas/Thinkstock(FORT KENT, Maine) -- An Ebola nurse fighting quarantine orders in Maine got a special delivery Thursday afternoon: a pizza from Moose Shack on Main Street.Nurse Kaci Hickox, told reporters Wednesday night that the one thing she missed while she was cooped up in her Fort Kent home was Moose Shack pizza. So on Thursday morning, the pizzeria contacted the police department to see whether they could deliver a pizza to her.Hickox, 33, returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa last week and on Thursday morning broke Maine's voluntary quarantine by going on a bike ride as officials waffled between whether to seek legal enforcement to the quarantine or let her off the hook with a blood test.April Hafford, whose father owns the pizzeria, delivered the pizza to Hickox's home Thursday afternoon. Earlier in the day, she told ABC News that the pizzeria's biggest concern was how their customers will feel about the special delivery."It's such a small place here, and it could go either way," Hafford said. "There’s a lot of people that maybe wouldn't come here because of it -- and who would come because of it. It could go either way."Hafford, who said she's seen Hickox and her boyfriend in the pizza shop three times since it opened in January, said Moose Shack has already received a lot of calls about Hickox Thursday morning, and that the quarantine is a controversial issue in the small town.And for those wondering, it was a pepperoni, black olive and mushroom pizza.

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