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Measles Outbreak Swells to 121 Cases this Year, CDC Says

Measles Outbreak Swells to 121 Cases this Year, CDC Says

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- The measles outbreak continues to grow with an additional 19 confirmed cases in the last week, bringing the total number of measles cases to 121 since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began tracking the outbreak on Jan. 1.The outbreak is believed to have begun with a group of unvaccinated people visiting Disneyland in California in December, but it has now spread to 17 states -- the latest being Delaware, Michigan and Nevada -- according to the CDC. Last week, five babies at an Illinois daycare center were diagnosed with measles, prompting national daycare center chain KinderCare to require all staff members working with newborns to be vaccinated.Of the first 34 people with measles for whom the California Department of Public Health had vaccination records, only five had received both doses of the measles vaccine, according to the agency. One received just the first dose.

Nationally, officials are seeing the same trend, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, who directs the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said during a news conference Thursday. Some of those 34 cases tracked by California may not be included in the 121 tally by the CDC because they were reported before Jan. 1."This is not a problem with the measles vaccine not working," she said. "This is a problem of the measles vaccine not being used."The CDC is seeing more adult cases of measles than usual during this outbreak, Schuchat said, adding that children are getting the virus, too.Cases have now been reported in Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington, according to the CDC. The agency issued a health advisory on Jan. 23, at which point the virus had only spread to six states beyond California and Mexico.The United States last year reported its highest number of measles cases in two decades, with 644 cases as part of 20 separate outbreaks. Health officials attribute the spike to a measles outbreak in the Philippines and overseas travelers.The 121 cases in the U.S. reported since Jan. 1 of this year are considered part of one outbreak.The measles virus is contagious long before symptoms appear, and it is airborne, according to the CDC. One infected person with the measles can spread it to an average of 18 other people, and it can linger in the air and live on surfaces to spread after an infected person has left a room.Complications include hearing loss, pneumonia and swelling of the brain, according to the CDC. About one or two people out of every 1,000 people infected with the measles die of the virus.

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Group Treadmill Classes Give SoulCycle a Run for Its Money

Group Treadmill Classes Give SoulCycle a Run for Its Money

YanLev/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Every Saturday morning, a pack of ten runners blasts through 45 minutes worth of sprints and hills. But rather than training on a track or the road, they take the Precision Running class held on a bank of treadmills at an Equinox Fitness Club in lower Manhattan, New York.Gyms all across the country are adding similar treadmill classes to their group fitness schedules in hopes they will do for the treadmill what SoulCycle has done for the stationary bike.Most exercisers approach treadmill workouts as a necessary yet mind-numbing evil for burning calories and improving fitness, said David Siik, who created the Precision Running class concept for Equinox. By building a class around the machines, you establish a group dynamic and add a motivational push, he said.“Creating complex and mathematical runs and presenting them in an exciting and easy-to-follow format creates a very inspired and engaging experience,” Siik said. “You will never be bored again on the treadmill -- that is a promise I make to everyone who takes this class.”A typical treadmill workout starts with a few minutes of warm up, followed by a series of intervals choreographed with changes in pace and incline. It ends with a cool down, some stretching and work on the core muscles of the abs and back, an area where many runners are notoriously weak. Most workouts last between 30 and 90 minutes.“Runners of all levels can do essentially the same routine and train together,” said Debora Warner, founder of Mile High Run Club, a treadmill class studio in Manhattan. “We have people who are training for their first race and some people training for ultra-marathons all in the same group.”Because they follow the same basic set of instructions but adjust the machine’s controls to suit their own personal ability, a 10-minute miler can run alongside a 6-minute miler and get a similar workout, Warner said.The classes have proven so popular that Equinox has added half a dozen to the weekly schedule. Mile High’s prime time workouts in the mornings, evenings and weekends are often sold out and they’ve recently added six additional treadmills. Clubs like Barry’s Boot Camp in Nashville, Tennessee and Miami, and Tread in Dallas are also filling up their classes.Considering the modern treadmill started out as a punishment for prisoners and spent decades in the lab as a tool for medical research -- according to scholars at Houston University -- the classes aren’t as tough a sell as you might think, Siik noted.“[People] often just walk by a class, observe, and decide on their own, they want in on that,” he said.

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Baby Girl Born with Possible Absorbed Twins Inside Her

Baby Girl Born with Possible Absorbed Twins Inside Her

Vernon Wiley/iStock/Thinkstock(HONG KONG) -- A baby girl born in Hong Kong appeared to have a growth of some kind in her left side, but doctors soon discovered the growth contained what could be "absorbed" siblings.The nearly 9-pound baby girl had a rare condition called fetus-in-fetu, which happens when a partially developed fetus becomes incorporated into a normally developing fetus (it's twin) in the womb. This condition affects about 1 in 500,000 births, according to the case study published in the Hong Kong Medical Journal this month.The mass was between the girl's liver and left kidney, and it included two partially formed fetus-like structures, one weighing half an ounce and the other weighing a third of an ounce.Each structure included a spine, intestines, bones with bone marrow, "primitive" brain matter, a rib cage and an umbilical cord, according to the study. The study authors said the partially formed fetuses and the baby girl shared the same DNA, fitting a popular theory that the woman was initially pregnant with identical triplets, but researchers aren't sure this is what happened.Judging by the body parts they found in the baby girl, the doctors determined that the absorbed twins could have been up to 10 weeks old before their growth stopped and they were absorbed. But the mechanism for this "absorption" is not fully understood, the study authors wrote, so it's also possible the extra fetuses were absorbed earlier and grew with the baby girl in the womb.The authors also suggested these structures may have been a teratoma, a kind of tumor containing different types of tissue, rather than absorbed identical siblings.

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HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase Likelihood of Unsafe Sex for Girls: Study

HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase Likelihood of Unsafe Sex for Girls: Study

Jeffrey Hamilton/Digital Vision/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) -- The vaccine used to guard against the human papillomavirus does not lead young people and teens to engage in more unsafe sex, according to a study released on Monday.The HPV vaccine has been on the market since 2006, but is not as widely used as other recommended vaccines, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The vaccine, given in three doses, is recommended for both boys and girls between the ages of 11 and 12. Just one dose of the vaccine cut down the risk of contracting HPV by 82 percent, according to a 2010 CDC study.In spite of its success, just 57 percent of female teens received at least one dose and 38 percent of male teens had received all three doses in 2013, according to the CDC.Dr. Anupam Jena, lead author of the study and a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, said one likely cause for the low use of vaccine is that many parents and physicians are apprehensive about the possibility that the vaccine could lead to an increase in unsafe sex among teens and young adults.“I’d like to emphasize that it’s a real concern. It’s not something to automatically dismiss but that’s why we need some scientific evidence to show we’re on the right path,” said Jena, an assistant professor of Health Care Policy and Medicine at the Harvard Medical School.In the study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Jena and his colleagues combed an insurance database to figure out whether people who had the vaccine had higher rates of sexually transmitted infections than those who did not get the vaccine.The researchers looked at the medical history between 2005 and 2010 of 21,000 girls between the ages of 12 to 18, who had been given the vaccine, and compared them with 180,000 women who did not have the vaccine. The study found that the vaccinated women did not have higher rates of sexually transmitted infections, suggesting that they did not have increased rates of unsafe sex.Jena said U.S. HPV vaccination rates pale in comparison to similar countries such as Australia, where around 80 to 90 percent of eligible young people are vaccinated. He said he hoped the research would encourage parents and physicians to get their children vaccinated."This is a reasonable concern to have had, but the evidence suggests that it’s not important," Jena said. "[Physicians] can be reassured by these findings and use them to talk to their patients."Robert Bednarczyk, assistant professor in the Hubert Department of Global health at Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta, wrote a commentary on the study for the Journal of the American Medical Association and said physicians have not recommended the vaccine as much as other recommended vaccines given to teens such as shots for meningitis.Because HPV is a sexually transmitted virus, Bednarczyk said some doctors are uncomfortable talking about potential sexual activity with their patients and their parents.“Some of them even said, ‘I think 11 is too young to have this discussion with patient,” Bednarczyk said.But Bednarczyk points out the vaccine is supposed to be given well before an adolescent is exposed to the virus through possible sexual activity and that the way the virus is transmitted does not need to be discussed in detail."Do you go into a detailed discussion about why it can spread and how it can spread?" said Bednarczyk, who pointed out doctors don't often go into great detail about how bacterial meningitis is spread before they suggest their patients get vaccinated. "This is a vaccine that’s recommended for you and it’s going to keep you from getting sick."Bednarczyk also pointed out another reason the shot is recommended at a young age is because younger patients tend to have a stronger immune response than older teens.

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College-Educated Cops Only Have Some Degree of Success

College-Educated Cops Only Have Some Degree of Success

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(EAST LANSING, Mich.) -- A new study suggests that a college degree may be a help and a hindrance for today’s police officers.Michigan State University criminologist William Terrill says that on the one hand, college-educated cops are less likely to use force than their peers who didn’t earn a degree.This choice to handle possibly volatile matters in a more controlled-way is seen as an important way of fostering better community relations.Yet, the study of 2,100 police officers from seven departments across the U.S. finds that those who went to college expressed more frustration with their jobs and their supervisors.Much of this has to do with getting assigned to patrolling high-crime areas, which often goes to the newer recruits.Another problem is that cops who majored in criminal justice or other fields such as sociology or psychology often have to resort to older and more established ways of policing that aren’t as effective as what they learned in college. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Older Baby Boomers More Health Conscious

Older Baby Boomers More Health Conscious

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Baby Boomers might have thought they'd live forever when they were young but now that a growing number of them are 65 and older, many are focusing on just staying healthy.That's the finding of a consumer survey by the consulting firm AlixPartners, which reveals that 45 percent of senior Boomers are spending at least 20 percent of their grocery budget on health and wellness products.Meanwhile, nearly two in ten of those 65 and older spend over 40 percent of their bill at the market on food and beverages considered good for their health.Among other things, senior Boomers say they look for labeling on products that indicates foods are low carb, trans-fat free and sugar free.They're also eschewing old favorites like red meat and processed food for seafood and fiber.However, one old habit that seems to die hard is flavor, with "taste" deemed an important attribute for 44 percent of Boomers 65 and older.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Equal Finances Put One- and Two-Parent Homes on Equal Footing

Equal Finances Put One- and Two-Parent Homes on Equal Footing

iStock/Thinkstock(COLLEGE PARK, Md.) -- No one doubts that a lot of single parents have a tougher job raising kids than when a household has two parents.However, a new study by the Council on Contemporary Families says that quality of parenting has much less to do with whether there are one or two adults in the home than how well they’re doing financially.Overall, Sandra Hofferth of the University of Maryland says the further away families are from the poverty line is a better predictor of parenting style.For instance, kids whose parents are at least 200 percent above the poverty line are far more likely to engage in after-school sports than those in poverty. Although more children of two-parent homes take part in sports, the difference is negligible if single parents are also more financially secure.Meanwhile, one- and two-parent households are also on equal footing when neither are financially disadvantaged when it comes to reading to their kids, limiting TV and even sharing meals five nights a week where single parents show a slight edge.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

More than 20 Cases of Mumps Reported in Idaho

More than 20 Cases of Mumps Reported in Idaho

shironosov/iStock/Thinkstock(BOISE, Idaho) -- Idaho is reporting more than 20 cases of mumps linked to an outbreak that started at the University of Idaho's Moscow campus.According to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, there were 21 cases of mumps confirmed or probable within the state, including six in the Boise area as of Friday. Two additional cases in Washington state were also believed to be linked to the same outbreak.Mumps can be prevented with the MMR vaccine that also prevents measles. The vaccine has been in the news in recent weeks as the measles has spread through at least 14 states and over 100 people.

In December, players on four National Hockey League teams contracted the mumps.The IDHW names fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, loss of appetite and swollen or tender salivary glands as the most common symptoms of mumps. The disease is contagious and can be spread through person-to-person contact via droplets of salia or mucus.

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See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

Stock Photo: moodboard/Thinkstock(TACOMA, Wash.) -- Turns out even polar bears can get a toothache.Boris, an elderly polar bear at the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium in Tacoma, Washington, is recovering after having a large tooth pulled.The bear had to undergo a three-hour procedure to remove the fractured and abscessed canine tooth, the zoo said in a post to its Facebook page. After getting the painful tooth removed, the bear was placed on a strict diet of soft foods.This is not Boris' first trip to the dentist. At 29 years old, the polar bear is one of the oldest in captivity and has already undergone a few root canals, according to ABC News affiliate KOMO-TV in Seattle.Boris has been a resident at the zoo since 2002, according to KOMO-TV.

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See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

Stock Photo: moodboard/Thinkstock(TACOMA, Wash.) -- Turns out even polar bears can get a toothache.Boris, an elderly polar bear at the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium in Tacoma, Washington, is recovering after having a large tooth pulled.The bear had to undergo a three-hour procedure to remove the fractured and abscessed canine tooth, the zoo said in a post to its Facebook page. After getting the painful tooth removed, the bear was placed on a strict diet of soft foods.This is not Boris' first trip to the dentist. At 29 years old, the polar bear is one of the oldest in captivity and has already undergone a few root canals, according to ABC News affiliate KOMO-TV in Seattle.Boris has been a resident at the zoo since 2002, according to KOMO-TV.

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See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

See How a Polar Bear Visits the Dentist

Stock Photo: moodboard/Thinkstock(TACOMA, Wash.) -- Turns out even polar bears can get a toothache.Boris, an elderly polar bear at the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium in Tacoma, Washington, is recovering after having a large tooth pulled.The bear had to undergo a three-hour procedure to remove the fractured and abscessed canine tooth, the zoo said in a post to its Facebook page. After getting the painful tooth removed, the bear was placed on a strict diet of soft foods.This is not Boris' first trip to the dentist. At 29 years old, the polar bear is one of the oldest in captivity and has already undergone a few root canals, according to ABC News affiliate KOMO-TV in Seattle.Boris has been a resident at the zoo since 2002, according to KOMO-TV.

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Woman Defends Herself After Husband Says She Gave up Newborn With Down Syndrome

Woman Defends Herself After Husband Says She Gave up Newborn With Down Syndrome

Courtesy Samuel Forrest(NEW YORK) --  A woman accused by her husband of divorcing him and giving up their newborn son after learning he was born with Down syndrome called the decision the "hardest moment" of her life.Ruzan Badalyan gave birth to Leo while in Armenia. Her husband, Samuel Forrest, told ABC News this week that she divorced him shortly after the boy's birth."I remember the sad faces of my relatives and the doctors and the diagnosis that sounded like a verdict: 'Your child was born with a Down syndrome.' One can never imagine my feelings at that moment," Badalyan wrote in a Facebook post. "Hardly had I recovered from the first shock, when the doctor approached me and told me to voice my decision whether I was going to keep Leo or not. I had to make the most ruthless decision in my life within several hours."Badalyan wrote that she spent several hours after her son's birth trying to decide on his "best destiny." She said that Forrest accepted that their son's interest should be first and that "only his move to another country could remedy the situation."

Calls to Badalyan and Forrest have not yet been returned.While Forrest said that his wife gave him an ultimatum after learning their son had Down syndrome, Badalyan said her husband did not support her while she weighed the decision."In the hardest moment of my life when my husband should be next to me and support and help to take the right decision, I could not find any support from his side," she wrote. "After that incident, he left the hospital notifying me hours later that he was taking the kid with him, that he is going to leave the country for New Zealand and I do not have anything to do with the situation. Without giving me any option and trying to find with me any solution in this hardest situation, he started to circulate the story on every possible platform without even trying to give me a voice accusing that I put him an ultimatum marriage or the baby, which is absolutely not true. I tried several times to communicate but he never tried to listen me and to find common solutions. The only response was the accusation from his part.Forrest, who plans to take Leo to his native New Zealand, said Badalyan filed for divorce one week after Leo's birth."Sam has never suggested joining him and bringing up the child together in his country," wrote Badalyan. "Neither did he tell me anything on the day we filed for divorce. The only thing he kept saying was that he didn't want us to separate, whereas my question what we should do always remained unanswered.""As a mother who has faced this severe situation, being in the hospital under stress and depression, experiencing enormous pressure from every side, not finding any support from my husband’s part on any possibilities of giving a child decent life in Armenia, I faced two options: to take care of the child on my own in Armenia, or to abandon my maternal instincts and extend the baby an opportunity to enjoy a decent life with his father in New Zealand. I went for the second option," she continued.

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Sixteen Test Positive for Tuberculosis at California High School

Sixteen Test Positive for Tuberculosis at California High School

Creatas/Thinkstock(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- Sixteen people tested positive for Tuberculosis at a California high school, the Sacramento County  Department of Health and Human Services said Friday night.The testing was done as part of an investigation launched after one student was diagnosed with the active tuberculosis disease. The first case was announced on Feb. 1.Of the 155 students and staff at Florin High School, 16 tested positive for exposure to tuberculosis. Those individuals will be evaluated further using chest X-rays and will be given preventative treatment. Further testing will be conducted in eight to 10 weeks, as it may take that long to develop a reaction to the test.The SCDHHS informed residents that the latent form of tuberculosis is not infectious, but that preventative treatment is necessary to stop the disease from progressing to its active form.

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Why the Vaccine Debate Is Unlikely to Land in the Courtroom

Why the Vaccine Debate Is Unlikely to Land in the Courtroom

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As the measles virus spreads, along with the tension over whether parents should vaccinate their children, it’s unlikely any confrontations will extend beyond the playground and into the courtroom, lawyers say.The parent of a child who caught measles from a purposefully unvaccinated child could sue, but it would be hard to win, George Annas, who chairs the department of health law and bioethics at Boston University, said."I think you could make an argument that you have a moral responsibility, but it would be extremely difficult to argue this as a tort case," he said."As long as you're following state law, it's almost inconceivable that any court would say you're responsible for something that has been sanctioned by your state."Sara Rosenbaum, a health law and policy professor at George Washington University, said a prosecutor would have to show the child was injured by measles, prove that the nonvaccinating parents caused the other child's measles, and show that they had a duty to protect other children from their unvaccinated child but breached that duty.Both cause and duty would be most difficult to prove, she said. The measles is so contagious -- spreading to an average of 18 people for every one infected person -- that it would be hard to say who got the virus from whom.Also, Annas said, the parents of the child too young or unable to get the measles vaccine for medical reasons may have more of a duty to keep their child away from unvaccinated children, putting some of the blame on them.Rosenbaum said, "It doesn't work because once you allow individuals to make choices on all sides -- whether to immunize or not immunize, take your child to school or not -- you get into the murky world of tort litigation. "That's why this issue is really a public health issue."But bioethicist Arthur Caplan said parents who choose not to vaccinate their children should be held responsible for the consequences of their actions.Most states allow vaccine exemptions for medical and religious reasons, but 19 of them allow vaccine exemptions for philosophical reasons, meaning parents can simply choose not to vaccinate their children because they don't want to do it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported 102 confirmed measles cases in 14 states at last count on Monday, but several babies have since been diagnosed, including five on Thursday at a Chicago-area day care."Even if the government says you can opt out, if a kid who's got the measles brings it to a day care center and sickens or kills my newborn baby, of course I have the right to sue you, and I should," Caplan said.He likened the situation to an accidental gun death. If a person has the right to own a gun and leaves it on a table, and a neighboring child picks it up and shoots himself, Caplan said, the gun owner is responsible for what happened.

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NHTSA: Drunk Driving Declining, Drugged Driving on Rise

NHTSA: Drunk Driving Declining, Drugged Driving on Rise

Feverpitched/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released a report on Friday showing that while drunk driving is on the decline, drugged driving has risen in recent years.According to a pair of studies released by NHTSA Friday, the number of drivers with alcohol in their system has declined by nearly one-third since 2007. That same figure is down more than 75 percent from the first such survey conducted by the agency in 1973. Nonetheless, nearly 25 percent of drivers had marijuana or other illegal drugs in their system."America made drunk driving a national issue," NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said. "And while there is no victory as long as a single American dies in an alcohol-related crash, a one-third reduction in alcohol use over just seven years shows how a focused effort and cooperation among the federal government, states and communities, law enforcement, safety advocates and industry can make an enormous difference.""At the same time, the latest Roadside Survey raises significant questions about drug use and highway safety," Rosekind noted. "The rising prevalence of marijuana and other drugs is a challenge to everyone who is dedicated to saving lives and reducing crashes."A second study was also conducted to determine whether marijuana use by drivers is linked to greater risk of crashes. The findings showed that while marijuana users were more likely to be involved in accidents, that risk may be in part due to other groups that marijuana users tend to be a part of. which, in and of themselves, place those individuals at increased risk.

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Why Are People Wearing Red Today?

Why Are People Wearing Red Today?

Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- People are wearing a lot of red on Friday for the 12th annual National Wear Red Day, which takes place the first Friday in February to raise awareness for women's heart health.

Since 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke every year, the American Heart Association started the day to help spread the word that heart disease is 80 percent preventable."It's not just a man's disease," the American Heart Association says on its Go Red For Women page.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease kills 422,000 people a year, but it can be prevented by making healthy lifestyle choices such as not smoking, exercising and eating right.Recognizing heart attack symptoms can also help -- especially considering the symptoms are a little different for women. Not all women experience the chest pain they've come to expect from a heart attack. Instead, they may feel fatigued, nauseous and have jaw pain.National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark of the federal department of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association.

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Medical Mystery: Woman Becomes Obese After Fecal Transplant

Medical Mystery: Woman Becomes Obese After Fecal Transplant

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A woman became obese after a fecal transplant -- hinting at the complexity of how obesity works in the body, experts say.The unnamed woman weighed 136 pounds -- but gained 34 pounds over the next 16 months -- going from a healthy body mass index to an obese one, according to a case study published in an Oxford journal called Open Forum for Infectious Diseases."The patient actually said this: 'From the moment I had the fecal transplant, I felt like a switch flipped in my body,'" said Dr. Colleen Kelly, a gastroenterologist at the Warren Alpert School of Brown University. "She felt like prior to the fecal transplant, she had never had to worry about weight."The woman, who never struggled with weight before the transplant, underwent the transplant in 2011 to cure C. difficile, a serious bacterial infection that can lead to diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon, Kelly wrote in the case study she co-authored. The transplant donor was the patient's 16-year-old daughter, who was normal weight at the time but later weighed 170 pounds, according to the study.Kelly said obesity is a complex problem, and many factors could have contributed to her patient's weight gain, including genetics and a return to normal health after being sick with C. difficile, which causes patients to lose weight because they are so sick.She said she usually sees patients gain five to 10 pounds following a fecal transplant to treat C. difficile, and this case was different."It was really dramatic," Kelly said. "Despite her best efforts she not been able to take off that weight."As a result, Kelly said she doesn't use obese donors anymore or donors with large waists in fecal transplants.Sean Davies, an obesity researcher at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, said it was an interesting case study but he would be "leery" about making to much of it.Still, he said, this case study is "in-line" with mouse studies comparing fecal transplant outcomes from normal weight or obese donors."Taking the fecal content from obese mice and transferring it to germ-free mice causes greater weight gain than transplanting the bacteria from lean animals," he said. "But in this single case study, there's a lot that could have happened besides just transplant bacteria."

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Dad Refuses to Give Up Newborn Son with Down Syndrome

Dad Refuses to Give Up Newborn Son with Down Syndrome

Courtesy Samuel Forrest(NEW YORK) -- When Samuel Forrest of Armenia heard a baby crying from outside his wife's hospital room, he knew his life would change forever.Not only had he become a father, but he would soon receive some unexpected news about his newborn son."This pediatrician walks out of the room with a little bundle -- that was Leo," Forrest said. "She had his face covered up and hospital authorities wouldn't let me see him or my wife. When the doctor came out, he said 'there’s a real problem with your son.'"Forrest followed doctors and nurses into a room where he'd finally get to meet his baby."When I walked into the room they all turned to me and said 'Leo has Down syndrome,'" he told ABC News. "I had a few moments of shock."After the news had sunk in, Forrest held Leo for the very first time."They took me in see him and I looked at this guy and I said, he's beautiful -- he's perfect and I'm absolutely keeping him," he said.Soon, Forrest walked into his wife's hospital room with Leo in his arms.Her reaction was unlike one he ever expected."I got the ultimatum right then," he said. "She told me if I kept him then we would get a divorce."Attempts to reach the hospital for comment weren't immediately successful. The baby's mother, Ruzan Badalyan, told ABC News that she did have a child with Down syndrome and she has left her husband, who has the child, but she declined to elaborate.Forrest, who's from Auckland, New Zealand, said he was completely unaware of the hospital practices in Armenia when it came to children."What happens when a baby like this is born here, they will tell you that you don’t have to keep them," he said. "My wife had already decided, so all of this was done behind my back."Despite his wife's warnings, Forrest said he never had a doubt in his mind that he would hold onto his son.One week after his birth, Leo's mom filed for divorce."It's not what I want," Forrest said. "I didn’t even have a chance to speak with her privately about it."Forrest, who works as a freelance business contractor, has plans for he and Leo to move to his native country of New Zealand where he said they'll receive support from loved ones.In the meantime, he's enlisted for some help on his GoFundMe page titled "Bring Leo Home.""This really came out of the blue for me," he said. "I don’t have a lot, I have very little in fact. The goal is to raise enough for a year so I can get a part-time job so Leo doesn't have to be in daycare and I can help care for him. He's lost a lot in two weeks. It'd be different if he had his mommy."Forrest has recently been working with disability awareness groups to share his story in the hopes that parents will become better educated on children with special needs."After what I've been through with Leo, I'm not going to sit back and watch babies be sent to orphanages," he said. "As a child with Down syndrome, that becomes somewhat of a label. If we can get around this label, we’ll see that they’re normal. They’re a little different from us, but they’re still normal.""They all have niches and I want to work hard to find out where Leo's special. This little guy is great," he added.

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The Wall Street Wrinkle: It’s How Men Like Their Botox

The Wall Street Wrinkle: It’s How Men Like Their Botox

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- There are many ways in which it seems men and women couldn't be more different, and Botox is no exception. While women are looking to be wrinkle-free, men are not."About three-quarters of the women that come to see me [for Botox] are looking to be 'frozen,'" said Dr. Norman Rowe, a New York City board certified plastic surgeon.It's a look that Rowe has dubbed the "Wall Street Wrinkle." The name, he said, comes from the high percentage of male patients who work in finance. "They really want to avoid looking overdone."These left-behind lines, Rowe said, are seen by his patients as a "badge of honor." Rowe said that while the national average of men seeking non-invasive procedures is about 7 percent, his is nearly double that. "But they really want to avoid looking overdone," he said, adding that men fear too much Botox may make them look irresponsible.Joseph Mancuso went to Dr. Rowe for his very first go at Botox. Though he was mostly nervous about the needles, he also wanted to avoid looking like he got too much Botox. "I just want to look a little younger, like I'm well-rested," he said."Sure you can grow old gracefully," Rowe said. "But what's gracefully? A few grey hairs and wrinkles are good. The men, they just want to look refreshed."But the women -- even women in the workforce -- strive to appear as young as possible, often getting fillers in addition to Botox to remove the lines completely.He called Wall Street an "extension of society. There's still a gender gap."

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The Goal of Getting into College Taking Its Toll on Teens

The Goal of Getting into College Taking Its Toll on Teens

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- Oh, these high school seniors today…they all seem to be acting more responsibly than their counterparts from more than a quarter century ago.But there’s a catch and it’s a big one, according to the UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute survey of more than 150,000 freshman at over 225 college and universities. Seniors in high school are so preoccupied with trying to get into a college that socializing with peers is falling by the wayside.While that might not seem all that important to adults, teens are feeling the effects of all the extra pressure they’re putting on themselves so by the time they start college, they’re aren’t feeling as great about it as they had long anticipated.How bad have things become? Back in 1987, 18 percent of high school seniors said they hung out with peers five hours or less per week. By 2014, 39 percent of seniors said the same thing.Meanwhile, “partying” six or more hours each week dropped from 35 percent to just nine percent over that same time span.As for their emotional well-being, 50 percent of the survey respondents put it at above their peers while almost 12 percent said it was lower. That’s compared to 3.5 percent in 1985.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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