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Shooting Outside NC Courthouse Leaves Two Wounded

Shooting Outside NC Courthouse Leaves Two Wounded

iStock/Thinkstock(NASHVILLE, N.C.) -- A shooting outside a North Carolina courthouse on Tuesday left two people seriously wounded.According to the Nashville Police Department, the incident took place at the Nash County Courthouse just after 11 a.m. A manhunt is underway for two suspects."We've been able to identify the possible suspects and this is an active ongoing investigation," Nash County Sheriff Dick Jenkins said."We believe that it was not a random act," Jenkins added, without providing any further details.The two victims -- both adult males -- sustained multiple gunshot wounds. One was shot in the shoulder and the other has a wound in his right hand and two wounds in his left leg. "They are in stable condition. They have serious wounds, but they're apparently non-life threatening," said Nash Health Care Public Relations Director Jeff Hedgepeth.Both victims were airlifted to Greenville, North Carolina for further treatment.

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Details on One World Trade Center’s Observation Deck Released

Details on One World Trade Center’s Observation Deck Released

Port Authority New York/New Jersey(NEW YORK) -- The operators of the highly anticipated observation deck at the top of New York's One World Trade Center have released new details about pricing and what visitors will experience when it opens in the spring of 2015.One World Observatory will span 120,000 square feet over three floors, providing visitors with panoramic views of New York City and the surrounding region.After taking elevators to the building's 102nd floor, visitors will watch a two-minute video presentation combing bird's-eye imagery and time-lapse shots of New York City.The main observatory space on the 100th floor features an interactive skyline "concierge" to help find city landmarks and neighborhoods from 1,250 feet in the air. That level will also feature a Sky Portal, where visitors can step onto a 14-foot-wide circular disc in the floor for a live view in high-definition of city streets below.One World Observatory will also feature three unique dining areas, including a seated dining area, a café, and a bar.Admission tickets go on sale in early 2015, with tickets ranging in cost between $32 for adults, $30 for seniors over age 65, and $26 for children ages 6-12.The Observatory will offer complimentary admission tickets to 9/11 family members and 9/11 rescue and recovery workers. Special discounts will be also offered to active and retired members of the U.S. military.One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the U.S., opens on Monday, Nov. 3, when media giant Conde Nast formally moves in.

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Officials Comb Surveillance Video for Trace of Vanished Broncos Fan

Officials Comb Surveillance Video for Trace of Vanished Broncos Fan

Tia Bakke(DENVER) -- Authorities are combing through hours of surveillance footage from Thursday's Denver Broncos-San Diego Chargers game and seeking people who may have seen Paul Kitterman after the 53-year-old father went missing during halftime.Kitterman seemed to be happy and behaving normally, his companions said, and told them that the experience of going to his first Broncos home game was "awesome." Soon afterwards, he vanished."We searched the stadium we have been going to hospitals," said his stepson, Jarod Tonneson, who went with him to the game. "We have just been all over the place."Court records revealed that Kitterman had a history of relatively minor motor vehicle citations over more than a decade, though more recent legal troubles involved a bank and the Colorado Department of Revenue.His friend, Tia Bakke, who went with him to the Broncos game, said she knew he had money problems, but doubted that would have been reason for him to vanish at the game."If he wanted to leave town because of money problems, he would have come home, gotten all of his money and left," she told ABC News.Denver police said that they were still actively investigating the missing persons case. Foul play was not being considered because "there's nothing to suggest it at this point," police spokesperson Sonny Jackson told ABC News Tuesday."We're being open-minded about the investigation," he said."With 70,000 people and cameras all over the stadium, you would see something if a violent crime occurred," Jackson told ABC News on Monday.Kitterman was sitting with Tonneson after going to the game with Bakke and another friend, who were sitting in a different section. He was last seen when he left to go meet those friends during halftime.Kitterman, a construction worker and ranch hand from Kremmling, Colorado, did not have his cellphone or any credit cards -- and only had about $50 cash -- when he went to the game, Bakke told ABC News."He would never bail on his son, or anyone so by Friday night, we knew something was really, really, wrong," Bakke told ABC News.Police were not actively searching on foot for Kitterman because they were not sure if a crime occurred.Much of the search has been put in the hands of friends passing out fliers and officials at Sports Authority Field, who were digging through the game surveillance footage.

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Registered Sex Offender Emerges as Star College Football Player

Registered Sex Offender Emerges as Star College Football Player

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A registered sex offender has emerged as a star player on a top tier college football team, resuming his athletic career after being expelled from the Air Force Academy where he was court-martialed for sexual assault.No National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rule prevents a person with a criminal conviction from playing college athletics, a spokesperson told ABC News. It is left up to the individual college or conference to determine eligibility.Jamil Cooks, 23, enrolled at Alcorn State in Mississippi, a Division One NCAA school, after being found guilty in April 2013 of abusive sexual contact in a court martial proceeding at the Air Force Academy, which required him to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.Cooks' lawyer, Richard Stevens, says he is appealing the conviction.The ability of Cooks to continue his football career despite being a sexual predator is only the latest example of distorted priorities that involve sexual violence, said Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand, D-N.Y."I think it’s wrong that they’re allowed to continue to play," she told ABC News.Officials at the Air Force Academy said the court-martial and dismissal of Cooks was part of an effort to end a culture in which sexual assault had gone unreported or tolerated.“It’s disappointing,” said Air Force Academy Superintendent Lt. Gen. Michelle Johnson about the ability of Cooks to continue to play high-level college athletics. "That’s not what we tolerate here.”Cooks was one of two members of the Air Force Academy football team court-martialed for sexual assault as part of a sweeping, controversial investigation that also led to the resignations or dismissals of 15 other cadets. Johnson was appointed superintendent after the investigation.A smiling photo of Cooks appears on Mississippi’s Sex Offender Registry, with his home address listed as a dormitory at Alcorn State, a small historically black college.Cooks, a defensive end, was named Alcorn State Player of the Week after he "recorded six tackles, one sack, and three tackles for a loss in the Braves 55-7 victory over Virginia University of Lynchburg" in September.In October, Cooks was named “newcomer of the week” by the Southwest Athletic Conference following his performance in an Alcorn State victory over Texas Southern.A spokesperson said the school “had no issues with Cooks enrollment,” but declined to say whether female students had been notified of Cooks' presence, citing privacy concerns for Cooks. The president of Alcorn State, Dr. Alfred Rankins, Jr., did not return repeated requests for comment.A general statement from President Rankins on the school website boasts of Alcorn State “scoring gains in athletics.”“If you’ve been convicted of sexual assault or rape you shouldn't be allowed to play on the team,” said Sen. Gillibrand, who is calling on the National Football League, NCAA and the military to do more to protect victims from sexual predators.She said the NCAA rules that allow convicted sexual offenders to play should be changed.“It shows that there is not a value put on the person who the crime was committed against," she told ABC News.In a statement, Richard Stevens, Cooks’ lawyer, says "the reporting about Jamil’s case has not only been inaccurate, it has been, in my opinion, irresponsible journalism."Cooks was convicted of abusive sexual contact but found not guilty of aggravated sexual assault. A charge of attempted sodomy was dropped at the request of the victim, according to Stevens.Stevens said Cooks' accuser made her allegations because she "was upset and angry that he didn't want a more serious, committed, and public relationship with her."Stevens said it is getting more difficult to "ensure fair trials in the military" because politicians and others "are continuously trying to make the military justice system more about pre-determined and politically palatable outcomes than about a search for the truth or actual justice."

An ABC News report on the Air Force Academy investigation will air Wednesday on Good Morning America, World News With David Muir and Nightline.

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Kaci Hickox’s Quarantine Was Based on ‘Fear and Politics,’ Attorney Says

Kaci Hickox’s Quarantine Was Based on ‘Fear and Politics,’ Attorney Says

Handout(NEWARK, N.J.) — Kaci Hickox, the nurse who was placed in quarantine at a New Jersey hospital despite exhibiting no Ebola symptoms after arriving from West Africa, is “very pleased” about her release and looks forward to some rest and relaxation, her attorney told ABC News.Hickox left the hospital Monday afternoon to be taken to Maine, where she lives. Her attorney, Norman Siegel, said he plans to speak with Hickox Tuesday about their strategy for dealing with the courts of law and public opinion.“Her civil rights were violated,” Siegel told ABC News. “At a minimum, she could bring an action for damages. But I think her goal is to try to revise the current policies with regard to, for example, mandatory quarantines.”Siegel criticized New Jersey and New York governors Chris Christie and Andrew Cuomo for enacting quarantine policies, despite criticisms from the Obama administration and medical experts that the measures were unnecessary.Hickox, 29, was the first person forced into New Jersey’s mandatory quarantine after arriving at Newark Liberty International Airport Friday. She had previously treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, but never registered a fever, leaving no medical reason to keep her quarantined, Siegel said.She was held in a tent structure outside of University Hospital in Newark.“When you look at what happened and how it happened, you come away with the sense that this policy was based on fear and politics rather on medical fact, and we can’t have the politicians directing these kinds of important issues,” Siegel said.Health care workers such as Hickox who return to Maine from West Africa will remain under a 21-day home quarantine, with their condition actively monitored, Gov. Paul R. LePage said in a statement.“We will help make sure the health care worker has everything to make this time as comfortable as possible,” he said.

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Unstoppable Lava Flow Reaches Hawaiian Town

Unstoppable Lava Flow Reaches Hawaiian Town

ABC News(PAHOA, Hawaii) -- A stream of molten lava has oozed into a small Hawaiian town, covering the yard of the house closest to the volcano, Hawaii County officials reported Tuesday.The lava flow has been edging its way towards Pahoa on Hawaii’s Big Island for weeks with authorities and residents powerless to halt or divert it.The final number of Kilauea residents affected has not been released, but it is expected to be dozens.The lava is advancing at about 10 to 15 yards per hour, making it far slower than one might expect from a Hollywood version of the nightmare scenario, but it is moving at a steady pace. One major road has been closed to everyone except residents. Teams of scientists are among the few allowed close to the flow so that they can provide reports from the burning front line.The lava is blistering hot, burying streets and covering trees. Residents in the scenic town of Pahoa on Hawaii’s Big Island were forced to flee, powerless to stop the approaching river of lava.“We don’t know what we’re going to do,” resident Theresa Zendejas said. “It’s really scary.”The lava has been spewing from the Kilauea volcano since it erupted in June. The lava flow has traveled 12 miles since then, at times speeding up erratically, recently fanning out to cover more ground.Officials say there is no way to stop the lava, but they’re working to protect power poles from burning and to create detours in case the main road is affected -- which would cut off access for thousands of people. Hawaii officials are making arrangements for those living in the lava’s path.Beyond being buried by dozens of feet of hardened black rock, structures could also catch fire by being near the 2,000-degree lava.Since Kilauea’s current eruption began in 1983, unstoppable lava flows have added 500 new acres to the island and destroyed at least 181 homes, a visitor center, a church and a community center, according the National Park Service.

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Second Dallas Nurse Ebola-Free, Thanks Hospital, Family and God

Second Dallas Nurse Ebola-Free, Thanks Hospital, Family and God

Obtained by ABC News(ATLANTA) -- A second Dallas nurse undergoing treatment for Ebola was released Tuesday from Emory University Hospital after doctors said she had been cured from the deadly virus.Nurse Amber Vinson, 29, was discharged after spending the last two weeks in Atlanta undergoing treatment in its biocontainment unit."I’m so grateful to be well," Vinson said Tuesday. "First and foremost, I want to thank God," she said, adding that God gave her the “hope and strength to fight” Ebola.Vinson also thanked her mother, fiancé and extended family for visiting."Family played such an important role in my recovery," she said. "By being there every minute every day even though you couldn't be close."She also thanked health workers who cared for her and stressed the importance of not losing "focus" on the fight against Ebola in West Africa. Before she left, Vinson hugged more than a dozen staff members, as they smiled, laughed and wished her a safe trip home to Texas.

President Obama spoke to Vinson on the phone following her discharge, he said during brief remarks Tuesday afternoon.He, too, stressed the importance of continuing to fight Ebola in Liberia. Alluding to the mandatory quarantines several states said they would impose on health workers returning to the United States from West Africa, Obama said it was important to make judgments based on science and not put up any additional barriers for people who volunteer to fight Ebola."America, in the end, is not defined by fear," Obama said. "It's not who we are. Americans are defined by possibilities. And when we see a problem and we see a challenge, then we fix it."

Dr. Bruce Ribner, medical director of Emory University Hospital's Infectious Disease Unit, said Vinson is the hospital's fourth Ebola patient since the outbreak began."As fellow members of the health care community, we deeply admire Ms. Vinson’s courage and dedication in caring for a patient with a serious communicable disease," Ribner said. "Nurses are on the front lines 24 hours a day in treating our patients and it is their skill, their knowledge and their passion for healing that makes one of the critical diff in caring for our patients."Vinson had cared for Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, who became the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Duncan died on Oct. 8, and Vinson's colleague, Nina Pham, 26, was diagnosed with Ebola a few days later. She has since been treated and released.Vinson took a flight to Ohio and returned to Dallas in the days before she, too, was diagnosed with Ebola on Oct. 15. That evening, she was flown to Emory University Hospital. Passengers on both of Vinson's flights were notified about the ordeal."We are overjoyed to announce that, as of yesterday [Oct. 21] evening, officials at Emory University Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control are no longer able to detect virus in her body," the family said in the statement on Oct. 22, adding that Vinson should be able to leave the isolation unit.Meanwhile, Dr. Craig Allen Spencer, who tested positive for Ebola last week in New York City a week after traveling home from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, remains in serious but stable condition at Bellevue Hospital in New York City.Another little boy was tested for Ebola at the hospital Monday after recently traveling from Guinea, but the hospital confirmed that he has tested negative and will be removed from isolation, officials said.

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Wild Hogs May Force Florida County to Cancel Halloween Festivities

Wild Hogs May Force Florida County to Cancel Halloween Festivities

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Children in a Florida county may experience a cruel trick instead of sweet treats this Halloween thanks to a group of wild hogs that are wreaking havoc on homes, authorities said.Feral hogs have recently been running amok throughout neighborhoods in Brevard County, on the Atlantic coast near Orlando, having already destroyed up to 17 yards by ripping up the grass in search of food, authorities said.Law enforcement has hired licensed tracker James Dean, 52, for the month to capture the hogs in the hopes that they will not pose a danger to children trick-or-treating on Halloween. Dean told ABC News that he has already caught 11."There's really no telling how many hogs are out there," Dean said. "But there's a lot more than those 11 that are damaging yards."

It can be expensive to repair the damage, with costs sometimes reaching over $1,000, he noted.Feral hogs are common throughout Florida, and tend to forage wider in late fall in search of food such as grub worms and acorns, Dean said, adding that the population has been growing."They multiply like rabbits," said Dean. "It's just totally impossible to keep them under control."Dean, a tracker of 20 years, said he uses a cooked mixture of corn, swamp water, sugar and powered yeast to lure the hogs into cages. He has set up traps before for Brevard County around both homes and golf courses. But with Halloween just around the corner, he said he plans to use a pack of dogs to chase the rest of the hogs back into the woods.Hogs, though they do not commonly attack, can be provoked if confronted or if they feel someone may pose harm, Dean said. No attacks have been reported yet this year but Dean advises anyone who sees one to walk in the opposite direction as their attacks can be vicious and aggressive."I've had four of my ribs broken. I've had my finger re-attached," Dean said. "My buddy, he had his cap muscles torn out. He had to have surgery."As for cancelling Halloween festivities, the decision is still up in the air."Just talk right now," Dean said. "That's one of the reasons why I want to bring in the dogs ... so the kids can have their Halloween."

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Deepwater Horizon Spill Left ‘Bathtub Ring’ of Oil Residue on Deep Ocean Floor

Deepwater Horizon Spill Left ‘Bathtub Ring’ of Oil Residue on Deep Ocean Floor

Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Edit by Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The oil spill at B.P.'s Deepwater horizon in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 left a "bathtub ring" of oil-rich water about the size of Rhode Island.A study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, found that some of the oil that spilled in the incident was deposited on the deep ocean floor. Additional "fallout plume" allowed suspended oil particles to sink to underlying sediment. Researchers also said that oil may have been deposited outside the 3,200-square-kilometer region near the well, which may have gone undetected due to "heterogeneous spatial distribution."

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Virginia Plans to Remove Guardrails Blamed for Injuries, Deaths

Virginia Plans to Remove Guardrails Blamed for Injuries, Deaths

zebra3/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Virginia is the first state to announce it plans to physically remove from its highways a controversial guardrail system blamed by accident victims for injuries and deaths across the country. The move comes after Trinity Industries, the manufacturer of the ET-Plus system, failed to meet a deadline to submit a plan to conduct new crash tests for the system.“The Virginia Department of Transportation is currently putting together a plan for removal,” Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) spokesperson Marshall Herman told ABC News Monday.The company was notified of the action in a letter sent by VDOT on Friday, addressed to Trinity Highway Products president Gregory Mitchell. The letter states that if the ET-Plus is removed from its roadways, Virginia will also seek reimbursement of the cost to do so.Herman said there is no finalized timeline to remove the end terminals, and should Trinity provide data proving the ET-Plus meets safety criteria, it will reconsider the recall.

Trinity Industries told ABC News in a statement that it is “moving expeditiously to initiate” crash tests that had been previously requested by the state. VDOT had given Trinity until last Friday to submit plans for crash tests of the ET-Plus and had, in the meantime, removed the end terminal from the state’s purchasing list. The company had requested postponement of the deadline.“We do not believe it would be appropriate for any state to remove a product that has met all test previously requested by Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and continues to remain eligible for federal reimbursement,” Trinity’s statement read.Thirteen states, including Virginia, said they have decided to halt installation of the guardrail system. Most recently Trinity’s home state of Texas announced Monday it is “discontinuing the use of these systems for new installations until further notice." Virginia is the first to say it will pull existing guardrails from the roadside.Virginia’s announcement came a week after a jury in Texas found that guardrail maker Trinity Industries had defrauded the government by altering the guardrail end terminal design nearly a decade ago and failing to disclose all of the changes to federal officials as required. Trinity, which plans to appeal the decision, was ordered to pay $175 million in damages – an amount that is expected to triple by statutory mandate.The modified guardrail, dubbed by Trinity the ET-Plus system, was the subject of an ABC News 20/20 investigation in September that looked into allegations from crash victims that the guardrail can malfunction when struck from the front by their vehicles. Rather than ribboning out and absorbing the impact as designed, the guardrails “locked up” and speared straight through the cars, severing the motorists’ limbs in some cases.According to an internal email obtained by ABC News, a company official estimated one particular change – reducing a piece of metal in the guardrail end terminal from five inches to four – would save the company $2 per guardrail, or $50,000 per year.Late last week Trinity announced it would no longer sell the ET-Plus “until the additional testing has been completed.”“We have confidence in the ET-Plus system as designed and crash tested by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute,” Gregg Mitchell, president of Trinity Highway Products, said in a press release then. “It has met all tests previously requested by the FHWA [Federal Highway Administration]. We take the safety of the products we manufacture very seriously.”Trinity said it would work with the FHWA on further crash testing.

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Washington State High School Shooter Lured Victims to Cafeteria Using Text Message, Police Say

Washington State High School Shooter Lured Victims to Cafeteria Using Text Message, Police Say

Jaylen Fryberg/Facebook(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) -- The Washington state high school student who shot five students, killing two of them, had invited them via text message to sit at the same lunch table the day of the cafeteria shooting, authorities said Monday.Jaylen Fryberg, 15, used a .40-caliber gun to commit the shootings, investigators with the Snohomish County Multiple Agency Response Team said of last Friday’s shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School.In a statement, police said, "The only pre-planning of the event that detectives are able to confirm is that [Fryberg] had arranged for a meeting of friends during lunch in the cafeteria. A witness confirms that the five victims were seated at the table when the shooter opened fire, striking the victims before turning the gun on himself."Authorities also said the handgun had been purchased legally and registered and owned by a family member. Police did not specify which relative the handgun was registered to."It is still under investigation how the shooter obtained the weapon prior to Friday’s incident," police said in the statement.Two of the victims, Nate Hatch, 14, and Andrew Fryberg, 15, were relatives of the shooter and remain hospitalized, according to the boy's grandfather, Donald Hatch.In a tweet, Nate Hatch wrote, "I love you and I forgive you jaylen rest in peace."Two girls, Zoe Galasso and Gia Soriano, were killed in the shooting.

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Deer Crashes into Iowa Furniture Store, Shows Self Out Door

Deer Crashes into Iowa Furniture Store, Shows Self Out Door

iStock/Thinkstock(CEDAR FALLS, Iowa) -- Furniture store owner Deb Emmert was letting her usual, paying, human customers into her Cedar Falls, Iowa, store on Saturday morning when a four-legged animal suddenly showed himself in.“I had just opened the door and let two ladies [in] and as a gentleman and his son were coming in the window exploded,” Emmert told ABC News. “There’s no other word for it. The glass just broke into a million pieces.”The culprit of the shattered window was a deer who then proceeded to run through Emmert’s Simpson Furniture store.“He started to go south in the store, and then turned, jumped over two sofas back-to-back and then went into an office where I think he thought he was going to get out,” Emmert said. “He rammed into another window but he didn’t fit and just kind of repelled off of it.”Emmert believes the deer was trying to get to a creek that is outside the back of the store. She says deer are common in the 49,000-people-strong town of Cedar Falls, but they are not common in her store.“The only other time was in 2010 when a deer got into our warehouse,” Emmert said. “Maybe now we’re going to have put up deer signs or deer deterrents.”Though the deer made a grand entrance by shattering the window, he did not stay long in the store.Less than three minutes after he entered, the deer let himself out of the store by literally opening the back door.“He walked through the mattress section and walked right out the back door,” Emmert said. “He just pushed the door with his head and he just walked out.”The deer did not cause any damage in the store besides the shattered window, according to Emmert.The deer himself also did not appear to be injured, aside from shaking his antlers after he first entered to shake off the broken glass he brought in with him, Emmert said.

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Ebola Nurse Kaci Hickox Released from Quarantine

Ebola Nurse Kaci Hickox Released from Quarantine

Kena Betancur/Getty Images(NEWARK, N.J.) -- The nurse who was angrily battling her enforced quarantine at a New Jersey hospital after treating Ebola patients was released Monday, and Gov. Chris Christie said the nurse will understand "when she has time to reflect." "I know she didn’t want to be there," Christie said at an event in Florida earlier in the day. "No one ever wants to be in the hospital, I suspect. And, so, I understand that. But, the fact is I have a much greater, bigger responsibility to the people of the public." Kaci Hickox, who tested negative for the lethal virus after she returned to the United States from Sierra Leone, has been outspoken about being held in quarantine since her arrival at Newark International Airport Friday. She also hired a lawyer known for taking human rights cases and they announced their plan to file a federal lawsuit against her mandatory 21-day quarantine. "I’m so thankful for the immense attention and support I’ve received. I just hope this nightmare of mine and the fight that I’ve undertaken is not in vain!” she wrote in a text to ABC News' Chief Health and Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser. The New Jersey Department of Health issued a statement Monday morning that Hickox had been "symptom free for the last 24 hours," and that it decided to discharge her after consulting with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention released its own set of guidelines Monday saying that anyone who did come into direct contact with "Ebola-positive individuals" will require active monitoring and will be quarantined in their home. Her release appeared to be a reversal the tough stance Christie had taken on the issue this weekend. The Republican governor, who is widely seen as one of the party's top presidential hopefuls for 2016, says that he ordered the quarantine to protect the people of New Jersey. Hickox has asked that she be taken to Maine and the New Jersey Health Department said she would be taken there by car, and not by public transportation. "Health officials in Maine have been notified of her arrangements and will make a determination under their own laws on her treatment when she arrives," the New Jersey statement said.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention released their own set of guidelines today saying that anyone who did come into direct contact with "Ebola-positive individuals" will require active monitoring and will be quarantined in their home.

 

Nurse released from NJ Ebola tent be quarantined in this northern Maine town at her home. pic.twitter.com/QxYvlk2zeN

— Michele McPhee (@MicheleMcPhee) October 27, 2014

 

Hickox's release was viewed by some as a reversal of Christie's position, but the governor said, "I didn’t reverse any decision."The decision to move Hickox to her home state of Maine so that she can be quarantined in her own home is not a break in Christie's protocol, he said, since she will still be serving out the remainder of the 21-day quarantine.Christie maintained that if she lived in New Jersey, and she had no symptoms, she would have been allowed to be in her home. Christie said Hickox was initially quarantined because she didn't live in New Jersey and they didn't have immediate arrangements to get her to Maine. But while in New Jersey, she developed a fever, so she was kept quarantined in a Newark hospital through the weekend.Hickox's legal team still plans to move forward with a lawsuit arguing her human rights were violated by the mandated quarantine.The Republican governor, who is widely seen as one of the party's top presidential hopefuls for 2016, didn't back down from his policy or reach out to Hickox."I have no reason to talk to her," Christie said."The fact is I’m not going to step away for a minute from protecting the people of my state and our region," Christie said. "So I understand that she didn’t want to be there. She made that very clear from the beginning. but my obligation is to all the people of New Jersey and we’re just going to continue to do that."He added that "there’s confirmation that she’s being treated quite well in New Jersey." Hickox, 33, hired civil rights attorney Norman Siegel to fight her mandatory quarantine. The nurse has said she feels that her "basic human rights are being violated," kept in an isolation tent at University Hospital in Newark, despite showing no symptoms of the Ebola virus. Hickox never registered a fever, Siegel said, but the Health Department's statement Monday morning said she did briefly have a fever. It did not say what her temperature was. She was the first person quarantined under a new strict policy instituted by Christie on Friday. New York, Illinois and Florida also instituted mandatory quarantines for anyone exposed to people infected with Ebola health. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that the state will allow home quarantines for people showing no symptoms, rather than requiring isolation in hospitals. The policies have drawn the attention of the Obama administration, which told the governors of New Jersey and New York that there are "concerns" about the mandatory quarantines, a senior administration official said Monday. Medical experts say that there is no reason for mandatory quarantines, since unless a person is showing symptoms of Ebola, they are not contagious.

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Army Quarantines General, Soldiers Who Were Fighting Ebola

Army Quarantines General, Soldiers Who Were Fighting Ebola

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The Army has decided that troops returning from deployments to Liberia should be quarantined so they can be monitored for possible exposure to the Ebola virus.The order immediately affected up to a dozen soldiers who returned to their home base in Italy this weekend, including Maj. Gen. Darryl Williams, the former top U.S. commander in Liberia."Out of an abundance of caution the Army directed a small number of personnel, about a dozen, that recently returned to Italy to be monitored in a separate location at their home station of Vicenza," Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, said Monday. "None of these individuals have shown any symptoms of exposure."Williams transferred command of Operation Unified Assistance on Saturday to Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky, who commands the 101st Airborne Division. Williams and his staff returned to his command of U.S. Army Africa which is based in Vicenza, Italy. The order will also apply to several dozen more Army personnel returning to Vicenza later in the week.Warren said that the decision was made by the Department of the Army and that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is aware of their decision.There are 882 military personnel assigned to Operation Unified Assistance in Liberia and Senegal. They are being sent mainly to build Ebola treatment units and provide the infrastructure needed for additional treatment. They will not be providing health care to Ebola patients and will have minimal contacts with the general population.Warren said there was no one incident that triggered the Army's decision as the personnel in question did not have direct contact with Ebola patients. A Defense official said the Army made it's decision over the weekend.Ebola symptoms include fever, exhaustion, muscle ache, vomiting and diarrhea.According to the Department of Defense policy returning troops who have been exposed to the virus will be medically evacuated to the U.S. for treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta or the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Man Vanishes at Stadium During NFL Game

Man Vanishes at Stadium During NFL Game

Tia Bakke(DENVER) -- Paul Kitterman told his friend Tia Bakke that the experience of being at his first ever Denver Broncos game in person  with his son was “awesome” -- and that was the last she heard of him.The 53-year-old from Kremmling, Colorado, seemingly vanished into the crowd at the Broncos-Chargers game Thursday night in what Denver police now call a missing persons case.“He would never bail on his son, or anyone,” Bakke told ABC News, “so by Friday night, we knew something was really, really, wrong.”Bakke, who traveled with Kitterman and his son, Jarod, to the game, said they had plans to meet afterward at a stadium gate.“We go down to gate 8. No Paul. We wait an hour. No Paul,” she said.Bakke’s group contacted stadium security and searched around the grounds until 1 a.m. before finally heading back to Kremmling without Kitterman.Kitterman has few contacts in Denver and had no cell phone, credit card or vehicle with him, Bakke said. She added he had plans to go hunting with his son the next morning.Denver police have filed a missing persons report and are assisting the family, but are not actively investigating because they are not certain a crime was committed.“With 70,000 people and cameras all over the stadium, you would see something if a violent crime occurred,” Sonny Jackson, a police spokesman, told ABC News.Now, friends and family are posting signs around Denver and appealing to the public to help with the search, Bakke said. But as time goes on, they are growing more concerned they are running out of options.“Now we’re just sick about it, and we have no idea what to do,” Bakke said.

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Police Use Silent, Giant Balloon in Pennsylvania Manhunt for Eric Frein

Police Use Silent, Giant Balloon in Pennsylvania Manhunt for Eric FreinPennsylvania Department of Transportation(CANADENSIS, Pa.) -- Police are hoping they can finally outsmart the elusive suspect in the shooting death of a Pennsylvania state trooper with the use of a giant balloon.The balloon is an "experimental device" ...

5-Year-Old Boy Under Observation at NYC Hospital over Ebola Concerns

5-Year-Old Boy Under Observation at NYC Hospital over Ebola Concerns

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A 5-year-old boy is under observation at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital Monday morning after experiencing a 103-degree fever after returning home from Guinea Saturday, prompting Ebola concerns, officials told ABC News.The boy is in isolation, but has not been tested for Ebola and is not under quarantine, the city’s health department told ABC News.Dr. Craig Spencer, who tested positive for Ebola Thursday, is in an isolation unit at the Manhattan hospital.

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Lava Advance into Small Hawaii Town ‘Inevitable’

Lava Advance into Small Hawaii Town ‘Inevitable’

iStock/Thinkstock(PAHOA, Hawaii) — Hawaii emergency officials acknowledged Sunday that the steady advance of red-hot lava into the small town of Pahoa appears “inevitable.”The lava is now just a few hundred yards away from homes, close enough that residents can now see the reddish glow of molten lava at night, Hawaii County director of Civil Defense Daryl Oliveira said.“It’s visible from their home and they are prepared for their evacuation,” Oliveira said Sunday on a conference call with reporters.“Although this is not new or a surprise, it was definitely a disappointment and something maybe heartbreaking to hear that we’re moving closer to the point where it looks like it’s inevitable that the flow will be coming into the community,” he said.Officials say they are still compiling exact numbers, but believe evacuation notices were issued Saturday to roughly 50 families, or households, that are directly in the lava’s path. Those families were told to prepare to evacuate as early as Tuesday.“There are no less than 50 to 60 structures in there as far as residences,” Oliveira said. “The impact of this may be fairly significant depending on what starts to burn.”People may be forced to leave sooner than Tuesday if the lava increases speed, he said.Pahoa is a town of about 945 people, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News RadioLava Advance Into Small Hawaii Town ‘Inevitable’

Gia Soriano, Teen Wounded in Washington School Shooting, Dies

Gia Soriano, Teen Wounded in Washington School Shooting, Dies

David Ryder/Getty Images(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) — Gia Soriano, a victim in Friday’s shooting at a Washington high school, has died, officials at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett said at a Sunday press conference. She was 14.Soriano was critically injured in the shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. She is the third person to die in the shooting."We are devastated by this senseless tragedy," her family said in a statement. "Gia is our beautiful daughter and words cannot express how much we will miss her."Authorities have identified the shooter as Jaylen Fryberg, 14.

One other female student died Friday. Three other students remain hospitalized, two in critical condition and one in serious condition.Parents and students gathered in a gymnasium at the school Sunday afternoon for a community meeting, with speakers urging support and prayers.Fryberg -- who shot five people before killing himself inside the school -- was a member of a prominent family in the Tulalip Tribes, and according to tribe member state Sen. John McCoy, he was highly regarded there."A lot of folks were considering him that he would move up the culture ranks and become a leader," McCoy said. "He had that kind of charisma and raw talent."Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Lake Tahoe Hikers Taking Too Many Dangerous Bear Selfies

Lake Tahoe Hikers Taking Too Many Dangerous Bear Selfies

Manutsawee Buapet(SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif.) — When park rangers tell hikers to leave nothing but footprints and take nothing but pictures, they probably aren’t talking about selfies.At least that’s what visitors to Taylor Creek in South Lake Tahoe, California, are learning.Park officials say that too many people are trying to take selfies with wild bears.“We’ve had mobs of people that are actually rushing toward the bears trying to get a ‘selfie’ photo,” Lisa Herron, spokesperson for the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, told the Reno Gazette-Journal. “It is presenting a safety issue. We are afraid someone is going to get attacked.”Manut Buapet was at Taylor Creek last week. She said tourists flocked to the bears, which weren’t afraid to come close.“There were like 30 people taking pictures of themselves with the bears,” Buapet told ABC News. “I was concerned. You never know what’s going to happen with bears, but people just stuck around.”There were no park officials around to keep the people and bears at a safe distance, said Buapet.“They weren’t scared at all of the people,” she said, adding that “some parents were trying to keep the kids away.”One bear cub came as close as two feet to the tourists, Muapet said.

 

Mama bear and cub feeding #taylorcreek #southlaketahoe #bears #tahoe

A photo posted by @lindasmarley on Oct 10, 2014 at 11:20am PDT

 

If the problem persists, officials have threatened to close off the popular bear-sighting area, which runs along the south shore of Lake Tahoe, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal. Taylor Creek usually sees an increase in bears around this time of year because they feed on kokanee salmon, which make their annual swim through the creek.

 

Chose a good time to go see the #spawning #salmon at #taylorcreek got to see a #blackbear #feasting #bear

A photo posted by sssmayhem (@sssmayhem) on Oct 10, 2014 at 1:14pm PDT

 

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