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Woman in Lawyers’ Attack on Ex-Boss Claims She Was Forced

Woman in Lawyers’ Attack on Ex-Boss Claims She Was Forced

Fairfax County Police Department(FAIRFAX, Va.) -- One of the married lawyers accused of storming the wife's former employer's home was the unwitting accomplice of her controlling husband, her defense argued in court Friday.The attorney for Alecia Schmuhl said she didn't know what was going on when her husband, Andrew Schmuhl, drove them to the home of her former boss and posed as a law enforcement officer to gain entry.Once the door was open, prosecutors said, Andrew Schmuhl tasered the terrified victim, then fired a handgun at the victim's wife, though he missed.Andrew Schmuhl then bound the victim with flex cuffs and engaged in what state prosecutor Ray Morrogh described in the Fairfax, Virginia, court as "torture."Friday's hearing in Fairfax County General District Court was held to evaluate Alecia Schmuhl's bond prospects. The judge ruled against her, saying she posed "extreme danger" to the state."There's a whole lot more about this case to come out in the weeks ahead," Judge David Schell said.Police have not named the victims, but the male victim is the head of a prominent law firm that reportedly fired Alecia Schmuhl for poor job performance, according to prosecutors, who said the firm "bent over backwards" to accommodate her but, in the end, let her go.The partner of the firm, the male victim in the attack, can barely speak after being stabbed multiple times in the head and is conversing with investigators via handwritten notes, Morrogh said.Prosecutors on Friday said Andrew Schmuhl is a former military intelligence officer and member of the JAG Corps who has been out of work for two years.Schmuhl had his wife wait outside during the alleged attack, they added, flickering the lights at some point, perhaps as a signal to her.It was not clear how long the alleged attack lasted but, at some point, Andrew Schmuhl left the victims, telling them he was "going to come back to finish this job," prosecutors said.Fairfax County Police earlier reported that one of the two victims was able to set off a home security alarm, which prompted the assailant to flee. When police arrived, the victims gave officers a description of their attacker, which included enough information about the getaway car to help police find the vehicle "a short time later."Upon approaching the vehicle, police found Andrew Schmuhl wearing nothing but a diaper, with his bloody clothes and weapons in the trunk, prosecutors said on Friday.Alecia Schmuhl's defense attorney said that her husband forced her to drive and it was not a high-speed chase.Both suspects are charged with two counts each of malicious wounding and abduction by force or intimidation, but Alecia Schmuhl also faces a charge of obstruction of justice without force and a felony count of eluding or disregarding police.

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Former Coal Mine Chief Executive Indicted for Conditions Causing Deadly Blast

Former Coal Mine Chief Executive Indicted for Conditions Causing Deadly Blast

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Don Blankenship, the former chief executive of the company responsible for the April 2010 coal mine explosion in West Virginia that killed 29 workers, now faces federal charges that he allegedly help create conditions leading to the blast by pressuring mine managers to violate safety regulations.The indictment was the result of a four-year investigation. 

Blankenship quit as CEO of Massey Energy Co. eight months after the coal mine explosion, the deadliest in the U.S. in 40 years.Among the counts, Blankenship is charged with conspiracy to violate safety laws at the Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, West Virginia.Prosecutors maintain that the former CEO micro-managed operations at the mine, often putting profits ahead of safety. If found guilty on all counts, Blankenship could wind up in prison for up to 31 years.Claiming his client was a tireless advocate for mine safety, attorney William W. Taylor III said Blankenship "is entirely innocent of these charges. He will fight them and he will be acquitted."

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Officers Injured While Confronting Knife-Wielding Man at Connecticut Navy Base

Officers Injured While Confronting Knife-Wielding Man at Connecticut Navy Base

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW LONDON, Conn.) -- A police officer guarding a Connecticut Navy base fired shots at a knife-wielding man who had allegedly tried to enter through a pedestrian gate, authorities said.

The suspect, who has not been identified, accosted a security officer at 7 p.m. near the entrance of the Naval Submarine Base in New London, prompting an officer to fire his gun.

One Navy Civilian Police Officer was injured by ricochet bullets and another officer suffered injuries from the knife.

Both officers were hospitalized and then released.

"The suspect was not apparently injured," according to a news release issued by the Naval Submarine Base New London.

The suspect was taken into custody and turned over to Groton Town Police.

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Eric Frein ‘Mom and Dad’ Letter Brings More Terrorism Charges

Eric Frein ‘Mom and Dad’ Letter Brings More Terrorism Charges

PA Dept of Transporation(CANADENSIS, Pa.) -- Suspected Pennsylvania cop killer Eric Frein has been charged with two additional counts of terrorism, stemming from a letter officials say he addressed to “Mom and Dad” that was found during a search of his computer.“I am sorry,” the letter read, in part. “You guys are great parents, I am just not a good son. I squandered so much opportunity and support and rarely tried my best at anything.”The letter appears to have been written in December of last year and amended in October of this year during the 48-day manhunt for the suspect, officials said.“Our nation is far from what it was and what it should be,” it read. “I have seen so many depressing changes made in my time that I cannot imagine what it must be like for you. There is so much wrong and on so many levels only passing through the crucible of another revolution can get us back the liberties we once had. I do not pretend to know what the revolution will look like or even if it would be successful.“Tension is high at the moment and the time seems right for a spark to ignite a fire in the hearts of men. What I have done has not been done before and it felt like it was worth a try.”Based on the letter calling for revolution, prosecutors said his alleged shooting of two state troopers was “intending to influence the policy of government."The letter ends, “I love you. Please forgive me of my many faults. And thanks for putting up with me for so long.”

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Philadelphia Kidnapping Victim Says She Befriended Abductor

Philadelphia Kidnapping Victim Says She Befriended Abductor

iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) -- The father of the Philadelphia woman who was plucked off the street earlier this month said his 22-year-old daughter befriended her captor in order to survive.

"I'm glad that my daughter was a friendly person and got him into being a friendly guy so he wouldn't harm her," Carl Freeland said. "I give all the praise to my daughter. She's the hero."

Carlesha Freeland-Gaither, 22, was found inside a parked car in Jessup, Maryland, days after she was kidnapped. Her alleged abductor, Delvin Barnes, 37, was arrested at the scene, authorities said.

Freeland said his daughter is still "a little distraught" but is doing well. He spoke after the City Council honored those who took part in finding Freeland-Gaither.

Also at the event were her grandfather Derek Alston and Dwayne Fletcher, who called police when he witnessed the abduction.

Alston said that his granddaughter "more or less convinced him to be her friend."

He went on to say his granddaughter had hit Barnes over the head with a hammer at one point during her capture, according to ABC affiliate WPVI.

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Fired Attorney Charged in Ex-Boss’ Home Invasion and Stabbing

Fired Attorney Charged in Ex-Boss’ Home Invasion and Stabbing

iStock/Thinkstock(FAIRFAX COUNTY, Va.) -- A woman who was reportedly fired from her law firm and her husband are charged with attacking an executive of the firm and his wife in their home.

Alecia and Andrew Schmuhl, who are both lawyers, have been charged with malicious wounding and abduction by force or intimidation after an attack in a home in northern Virginia on Sunday, according to Fairfax County Police.

Officers responded to a home invasion and robbery call just before 10 p.m. and found the married 61-year-old homeowners, whose names have not been released publicly, "suffering from apparent stab wounds to the upper body," police said in a statement.

Police determined that the male homeowner, who is listed as the managing shareholder at an Arlington law firm on the company’s website, answered the front door and the male assailant "made his way into the home and assaulted the male homeowner," the police release states.

The victim's wife heard the disturbance and went towards the front door, only to be attacked by the same assailant, police said. One of the two victims was able to set off a home security alarm which prompted the assailant to flee.

When police arrived, the victims gave officers a description of their attacker which included enough information about the getaway car that helped police find the vehicle "a short time later." Inside the car was Andrew Schmuhl, 31, and Alecia Schmuhl, 30, and both were arrested, police said.

Both suspects are charged with two counts each of malicious wounding and abduction by force or intimidation, but Alecia Schmuhl also faces a charge of obstruction of justice without force and a felony count of eluding or disregarding police. They are being held without bond after appearing in Fairfax County General District Court on Wednesday.

Alecia Schmuhl was dismissed from the firm of Bean Kinney & Korman late last week, according to ABC News affiliate WJLA.

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According to their LinkedIn profiles, the two suspects both have law degrees from the same university and had worked as lawyers in northern Virginia since graduation.

The investigation is still under way, but police said they believe it was not a random act. Because the police have not formally released the names or conditions of the victims, ABC News has chosen to withhold their names, but the law firm Bean Kinney & Korman released a statement.

"We are very affected by the event and very concerned for everyone involved and hope that there is full recovery for our partner and his wife," David Canfield, a spokesperson for Bean Kinney & Korman, told ABC News.

The violence of the attack stunned the victims’ neighbor Dave Tivel, who told ABC News, "It’s a pretty quiet neighborhood" where the only crime they experience is when "somebody will leave a bicycle out in front by the street and some yard guys will grab it."

Tivel said that the victims lived in the area for more than a decade and he regularly saw the husband go on daily walks around the neighborhood for exercise.

"I just can’t believe that a couple of lawyers -- you'd think they'd have more sense than to do something like that," Tivel said of the attackers.

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Gun Sales Boom Ahead of Ferguson Ruling

Gun Sales Boom Ahead of Ferguson Ruling

iStock/Thinkstock(FERGUSON, Mo.) -- Gun stores near the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson have seen sales zoom as the area awaits a grand jury decision on whether to indict a police officer for shooting unarmed teenager Michael Brown.John Stephenson of Metro Shooting Supplies in nearby Bridgeton said he normally sells 10 to 15 guns a day. But for the last three weeks, he said he has been selling between 30 and 50 guns daily, a nearly 300-percent increase.The grand jury's decision was initially expected by mid-November, and law enforcement authorities have been training in case the jury's ruling triggers another spasm of violent protests.

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The biggest sellers have been "home defense shotguns" and "high capacity semi-automatic pistols," particularly the Smith & Wesson M&P9, Stephenson said. He's sold about 250 of the pistols in the last few weeks."As fast as we get them in, we sell them," he said.The gun sales have been fueled by the looming grand jury ruling and the memory of the violent protests following the shooting of Brown on Aug. 9. Lawyers for the family said Officer Darren Wilson should have been arrested immediately, but the police claim that Wilson fired in self-defense after he and Brown struggled for his gun through a police car window and later when Brown allegedly advanced on the officer.Stephenson said people are afraid of what could happen following the grand jury's decision."There are people in fear of their lives and property, and other people who are concerned," he said.It's a reaction that isn't confined to Ferguson, Stephenson said."There was a protest in St. Louis and outside the Rams football game. It's gone beyond Ferguson," he said.

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Parents Ordered to Pay Estranged Daughter’s College Tuition

Parents Ordered to Pay Estranged Daughter’s College Tuition

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A New Jersey woman has successfully sued her estranged parents to pay for her college tuition.A judge in Camden County, New Jersey, ruled that Caitlyn Ricci's biological parents will have to cough up $16,000 each year so that Ricci, 21, can continue classes across the Delaware River at Temple University in Pennsylvania, ABC News station WPVI in Philadelphia reported.The parents' attorney is appealing the judge's decision, her mother, Maura McGarvey, told ABC News. She said she's shocked her own daughter would sue her."Of course, it's not anything you ever imagine," she said between tears. "I feel like I tried very hard to raise my child right."McGarvey said she learned Ricci was suing her and her ex-husband when the court papers arrived on the Friday before Mother's Day 2013.The parents had already filed a motion to emancipate their daughter.Ricci's parents' marriage only lasted two-and-a-half years. Ricci lived with her mother but also saw her father, the couple said."She comes from two loving families and she was given what she wanted when she was growing up," her father, Michael Ricci, told WPVI.McGarvey described her daughter as a rebellious teenager who left home and moved in with her grandparents last February because she didn't want to follow her mother's rules, putting stress on the family's relationship. She said the only time she has seen her daughter since she started at Temple University was in a courtroom."She packed her stuff and moved in with my ex-in-laws," McGarvey said.Caitlyn Ricci’s attorney, Andrew Rochester, told ABC News she was unavailable for comment. He told WPVI her parents were to blame for the separation."Caitlyn did not voluntarily leave the home. She was thrown out by her mother," Rochester told WPVI."Caitlyn really is a good girl. She is the nicest, sweetest girl," he added. "All she wants is to go to college."A judge said divorced parents may be required to contribute to their children's education, according to WPVI.Ricci's grandparents are paying her legal fees, according to WPVI.

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The Absurd Reason US Marshals Spend Millions on Charter Flights

The Absurd Reason US Marshals Spend Millions on Charter Flights

Greg Kahn/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A new review of the U.S. Marshal Service said that the cost of bringing international fugitives to justice in the U.S. is getting out of control, partly because the service is spending millions of taxpayer dollars on charter flights for criminal transport. But what is normally thought to be a luxury, the service says, is actually a necessity due to some obscure lines in U.S. legal code.Last year alone the service spent some $5.3 million to remove 875 international fugitives from a third country and bring them to the U.S., according to a Department of Justice Inspector General report released on Thursday. The Marshals had requested the review, hoping to curb the “spiraling cost” of the removals.Many trips cost next to nothing as “some removal events from Mexico may involve simply walking or driving the fugitive across the U.S. border.” Others, however, can run up a tab north of $200,000 each -- usually on the relatively rare occasion when the USMS springs for taking their quarry home on chartered flights.In fiscal year 2013, the service took 29 chartered flights, costing approximately $2.3 million, the IG report says. The difference in cost from chartered to commercial can be striking, as noted in a section of the IG report that said a 2012 chartered transport for a fugitive from Scotland to Arizona was approximately $130,000, compared to a similar removal the next year done commercially for just under $6,000.But while the IG criticized the Marshals for sometimes not explaining why some chartered fights were necessary, in the report the Marshals do explain one curious problem with what’s known as “959” cases.The “959” refers to a section in the U.S. legal code that says when a person is apprehended on certain drug charges outside the U.S., they “shall be tried in the United States district court at the point of entry where such person enters the United States...” By the USMS’s interpretation, this means “where the aircraft first touches down” -- no connecting domestic flights allowed, even just for refueling.“As a result, the USMS must ensure that a '959' fugitive is taken directly to the federal judicial district where the original charge was brought so that prosecutors responsible for the case can handle the prosecution,” the IG report says. “This can be problematic when commercial airlines do not offer direct flights to a particular federal district.”For example, the IG report says that the Southern District of New York doesn’t have a major international airport, “yet many narcotics and high-profile cases are charged in this district.” So, the USMS has to charter a plane that can fly into a smaller airport in Westchester County, which is in the right judicial district, even though major hubs like JFK, LaGuardia and Newark International Airport are just miles away.The IG conceded that there was little to be done about the “959” cases, short of telling the Marshals to “seek legislative change” to the U.S. code to remedy the problem.

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Ferguson Braces for Grand Jury’s Michael Brown Decision

Ferguson Braces for Grand Jury’s Michael Brown Decision

Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(FERGUSON, Mo.) -- Stores have boarded up their windows and civil rights groups are holding non-violence training sessions as the jittery town of Ferguson, Missouri, prepares for the grand jury verdict in the shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by a police officer.Anthony Gray, one of the attorneys for Brown's family, said on Thursday that he believes that Thursday's testimony before the grand jury by pathologist Dr. Michael Baden suggests that "we're probably getting to the end of the witness list." Baden conducted a private autopsy on Brown on behalf of the family.The grand jury must decide whether to bring criminal charges against Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson for fatally shooting Brown last August. The case has been racially charged because Wilson is white and Brown was black.

The grand jury's decision has the potential for public outbursts no matter which way the jury rules, but officials are particularly concerned that no indictment could trigger a renewal of the violent protests that wracked Ferguson during the summer.Benjamin Crump, another Brown family attorney, appealed to the protesters to remain non-violent, but he also asked for police restraint.“To law enforcement officers who will be patrolling the streets, we would like to thank you in advance for not having a repeat" of the tactics that critics said were heavy handed, he said. The folks of Ferguson are wary."We're hearing some rather specific threats through law enforcement and customers coming in the store," John Stephenson, the general manager of Metro Shooting Supplies, told ABC News. "I can't take them as cast in concrete, but word is on the street they're going to be hitting gun stores."Metro Shooting Supplies has experienced a roughly 300 percent jump in gun sales in recent weeks, Stephenson said, noting that rather than the typical 10 to 15 gun sales per day they've been selling between 30 and 50 every day for the past three weeks.

He said that gun stores are reportedly targets because "very small segment of our society, the people that choose to misbehave," will try to rob the stores for ammunition."More and more people have gotten to the point where they're going to take matters into their hands," Stephenson said.The store has added extra private gun lessons and state-mandated conceal carry tutorials that gun carriers must take before applying for concealed weapons licenses."I'm concerned for my own personal safety and I've got a wife and two daughters," Stephenson said.Violent protests and criticism of the forceful police response kept Ferguson in turmoil for weeks after the Aug. 9 shooting. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said this week he is determined to make sure, whatever the outcome, problems do not arise again."Violence will not be tolerated," Nixon said. "The residents and businesses of this region will be protected."Gray said on Thursday that Nixon's comments were one-sided. “Law enforcement should have been equally condemned by the governor,” the lawyer said.The St. Louis County Police, St. Louis Metropolitan Police and the State Highway Patrol are the three law enforcement agencies tasked with keeping the peace, but the National Guard will be available, Nixon said.More than 1,000 law enforcement officers have been given more than 5,000 hours of additional training. The specifics of the training have not been revealed, but one focus was on better ways to communicate and coordinate with fire and medical response units."They're doing what they're supposed to be doing, as far as I can tell," said Steve Gomez, a former FBI executive and ABC News security consultant."They're anticipating that if there are protests and rioting, it's not going to take place in Ferguson, but in the higher end areas," Gomez said, noting that sporting venues are also areas of specific concern for law enforcement officials.

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FBI, NYPD Seeking Two Suspects in January Jewelry Store Robbery

FBI, NYPD Seeking Two Suspects in January Jewelry Store Robbery

FBI/NYPD(NEW YORK) -- The FBI and the New York Police Department are investigating a pair of men who were allegedly involved in a smash-and-grab robbery at a New York City jewelry store in January.Courtney Hardin and Jamal Dehoyos are believed to be members of a robbery crew responsible for the January robbery at a Manhattan Cartier store. During the robbery, more than $700,000 worth of watches were taken.The robbery crew has also been linked to multiple similar robberies in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Virginia.Police described Hardin as a 6-foot-2 inch tall black man weighing about 200 pounds. He is 25 years old and is known to spend time in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Crown Heights areas of Brooklyn. Police say he is often called "Mazie" or "Mozie."Dehoyos was described as a black man, standing about 6-feet-1 inch tall and weighing 200 pounds. He's in his late 30s. He often spends time in the East New York area of Brooklyn or the Springfield Gardens and Flushing neighborhoods in Queens.Authorities say the two men should be considered armed and dangerous. Anyone with information is urged to call (212) 384-1000.

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Driver Reportedly Blames Truck Stuck in Milwaukee Park on GPS

Driver Reportedly Blames Truck Stuck in Milwaukee Park on GPS

iStock/Thinkstock(MILWAUKEE) -- The driver of a tractor-trailer that ended up in the middle of a Milwaukee park reportedly told police his GPS navigation system led him there.The driver, who was not identified, drove his trailer onto a walkway in Milwaukee’s Lake Park on Tuesday afternoon. The driver steered the truck over two bridges, striking a tree and damaging a railway in the process, according to ABC News affiliate WISN.The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported the driver was a 50-year-old man from Indiana. He was fined $579.80 for reckless driving and failure to obey signs, police said, according to the newspaper.Milwaukee County Sheriff’s officials did not immediately reply to a request for comment.Crews arrived on Wednesday to remove the truck from the park.

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Hammerhead Shark Stalks Florida Kayakers for Two Miles

Hammerhead Shark Stalks Florida Kayakers for Two Miles

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Mark Naumovitz and a fellow kayaker off of Florida’s coast encountered a surprising guest this week -- a hammerhead shark.Underwater video shows the shark trailing the group for two miles.“He hit my rudder and jarred my whole kayak,” Naumovitz said. The shark followed along, “steadily and creepily,” he added.The kayakers believe the shark was about 13 feet long, about as big as their kayaks.“With a big shark following you, it got a little hairy -- just a little hairy I think,” Naumovitz said.Hammerheads are not considered as aggressive as great whites, with fewer than 30 attacks in recorded history. But they can be territorial -- a lesson learned by a spearfishing duo in California who were circled by an 8-foot hammerhead. The duo clung to each other and jabbed at the shark with spears before deciding to get back on their boat.Experts believe warm waters from El Nino could be responsible for increases in shark encounters, with the warm waters attracting fish -- as well as the bigger fish that eat them.

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Exclusive: Surveillance Video Shows the Chilling Moments After NJ Mall Shooting

Exclusive: Surveillance Video Shows the Chilling Moments After NJ Mall Shooting

Courtesy of Bruce Nagel/The Mall at Short Hills(SHORT HILLS, N.J.) — Like hunters, they stalked their prey.Slowly, brazenly, they rode around one of New Jersey’s toniest shopping malls staking out cars and shoppers. They’d drive and then wait. Deliberate. Hidden in plain sight. Prepared to strike on their own schedule.When carjackers gunned down a 30-year-old lawyer after a night of Christmas shopping 11 months ago, the reaction across the country was horror. Dustin Friedland, 10 days before Christmas, had done nothing more than choose to drive an expensive Ranger Rover -- a theft target, police said. For that, his young wife would be widowed.As shocking as the story was, the actual images from that night at the Mall at Short Hills near Newark Airport are simply chilling. Security-camera footage obtained by ABC News this week shows Friedland’s killers were perfectly calm and calculated as they trolled the lots during two separate nights in a large SUV. And then, once the dying Friedland was waiting in vain for an ambulance, the video shows the suspects racing away -- followed by Friedland’s own Range Rover that they wanted to snatch.“It is incredible,” said Bruce Nagel, the lawyer representing Friedland’s widow. “You see both the perpetrators’ vehicle and my clients’ vehicle, speeding out of the mall. There is nobody there. There is no policeman to stop them.”“The surveillance videos are chilling,” he said. “On December the 12th, the same car with apparently the same individuals was apparently casing the mall. They actually had a dry run...On December the 15th, the night in question -- the videos are even more chilling. It shows that these individuals in the same exact car as three days earlier were on the property.”Four men were later arrested and indicted on a list of charges, including murder and carjacking. They’re all in jail awaiting trial and each faces the possibility of life in prison if convicted.Jamie Schare Friedland, who was there when her husband was killed, is suing the mall’s operators and the local ambulance corps for wrongful death. As part of that case, Nagel obtained the mall’s security-camera video, and he shared the footage with ABC News just days after a judge denied the mall’s request to keep the recordings under wraps.Mrs. Friedland has never spoken publicly about what happened that night.Mall lawyer Christopher McIntyre, citing the ongoing litigation, declined to discuss any aspect of the case or of security at the shopping center.In speaking out for the first time, Nagel said the devastation the Friedland family has suffered needs to be “a wakeup call…the holiday season is coming up. It’s going to be one year on Dec. 15th that this tragic incident occurred, and I want the public to realize that the mall has not changed its ways.”“If the malls want people to come and spend their money at stores that are located there, they’ve got to make it safe and this case says to them go out and take the steps to make sure your patrons are going to be safe,” Nagel said.

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Industrial Accident Triggers Large Explosions at Arizona Mine

Industrial Accident Triggers Large Explosions at Arizona Mine

iStock/Thinkstock(GLOBE, Ariz.) — An industrial accident triggered large explosions at an Arizona mine early Thursday, but no injuries were reported, the facility’s general manager said.Derek Cooke, general manager at the Freeport-McMoRan smelter in Globe, said the incident involved molten copper breaching a processing vessel and flowing onto the ground.The molten copper came into contact with infrastructure, causing fires to break out, Cooke told ABC News.Local fire crews are working to contain the flames, Cooke said, and the molten material is contained and cooling.Personnel at the facility -- which is located about 90 miles east of Phoenix -- have all been accounted for, Cooke said.

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Pair Sought in Daring Midday Armed Jewelry Heist in NYC

Pair Sought in Daring Midday Armed Jewelry Heist in NYC

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- New York investigators are pouring over surveillance tapes looking for clues that will help them identify two heavily armed men who allegedly robbed a jewelry store in the city’s busy Diamond District, escaping with more than half a million dollars in jewelry and $6,000, according to authorities.

The heist occurred around 2:30 p.m. Tuesday as the Veterans Day Parade passed by less than a block away.

“They had a great knowledge of the situation,” said Nick Casale, an ABC News consultant and former member of the NYPD. “They cased this place prior. They came in boldly. They came in comfortably.”

Police said one man posed as a delivery man Tuesday and was let into the eighth-floor Standard Jewelry Shop. Four workers were inside at the time, including owner Daniel Mikhaylov.

“Suspect No. 1 pulls out a gun and demands the jewelry in the safe to be placed into a bag that he was carrying,” said Deputy Chief William Aubrey. “A fifth employee returned during this time and was struck by suspect No. 1 in the head with a gun.”

Police said the second man involved in the robbery waited outside as a lookout. The worker who was struck in the head — Mikhaylov’s father — was in stable condition.

Mikhaylov told ABC News on Wednesday that 90% of the shop’s inventory — including Rolex watches, some diamonds, and Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry pieces — had been stolen.

He said that the pieces were not insured because the shop did “business among friends.”

He said he did not recognize either man.

He said the two men claimed they had more accomplices downstairs.

Police took their search to the rooftops on Wednesday with its K9 unit, hoping the dogs would catch a scent.

Sources, however, told ABC News that the pair likely didn’t exit from the roof and that they ran out the front of the building, going in two different directions and vanishing into the parade crowds.

Police said that one of the two had used the subway after leaving the building and that cameras had caught him entering the station.

They were reportedly running surveillance images through a mug shot database as well as fingerprints found at the scene.

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EDITED Abigail Hernandez Waited to Reveal Her Kidnapper’s Name

EDITED Abigail Hernandez Waited to Reveal Her Kidnapper’s Name

(NEW YORK) -- The New Hampshire teen who was kidnapped last fall knew who her captor was, but did not reveal the name until a week after her release from captivity, court papers reveal.A week after she mysteriously returned home this summer, Abigail Hernandez told her mother she knew who had been holding her captive for nine months because she found his name in a cookbook he handed to her when she was being held captive, according to the newly-released documents.

The documents were released on Wednesday in response to a motion filed by The Associated Press to unseal the arrest warrant affidavit against Nathaniel Kibby.Hernandez, 15, has denied she ever had contact with Kibby before the kidnapping.Kibby was arrested on July 28, a week after Hernandez reappeared. He has been charged with kidnapping and remains in custody.

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Earthquake Hits Kansas

Earthquake Hits Kansas

Photodisc/Thinkstock(CONWAY, Kan.) -- A 4.8-magnitude earthquake hit Kansas Wednesday afternoon near the city of Conway Springs, according to the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center.

A spokesman for the Sumner County Emergency Management in Kansas told ABC News that he received no reports of major damage.

People in Conway Springs and Derby, near Wichita, noted that they felt shaking for 10 to 20 seconds, but added that the shaking was “not intense.”

A fire truck is headed to a location eight miles south of Conway Springs, which is believed to be the earthquake's epicenter, to check on one location that might have received damage.

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Suspect Charged in Wife’s 2012 Murder Enters Not-Guilty Plea

Suspect Charged in Wife’s 2012 Murder Enters Not-Guilty Plea

Harold Henthorn /FacebookA Colorado man accused of killing his wife after she fell off a cliff while hiking with him in a national park in 2012 pleaded not guilty in federal court Wednesday afternoon.Harold Henthorn did not speak in the Denver federal court during the first session of the day, but sat beside his attorney while wearing a khaki jumpsuit and his wedding ring.

Authorities confirmed last week that they had also launched an investigation into the 1995 death of his first wife, Sandra Henthorn. Sandra, then 38, died when a jack slipped while she and her husband were changing a flat tire and their car crushed her to death.Henthorn was not charged with his second wife Toni's 2012 death until last week, after police said they determined that they have enough evidence to argue that it was not an accident."Mr. Henthorn was the only person in deserted areas in both of his wives' deaths," U.S. Attorney Blair Spencer said in court Wednesday.

When asked by the judge if he had enough money to pay for bond, Henthorn's attorney, Craig Truman, said that he would be getting financial help from family and friends because he has not had "steady employment" for years.Concerns about Henthorn's financial standing were raised by Dana Chamberlain, an auditor in the economic crime section of the U.S. Attorney's office who reviewed his tax returns and bank accounts for the case. She said that Henthorn had told friends that he worked as a fundraiser for nonprofits, but there was no money trail to support that claim.Toni Henthorn had three $1.5 million life insurance policies in her name at the time of the accident, authorities said. Though the Special Administrator of the Estate noted that a claim was made for one of those policies just two days after she fell 140 feet to her death -- on the same morning that her autopsy was being performed -- that money was never paid.

Chamberlain noted that Harold Henthorn has not received any payments as a result of Toni's life insurance policies, but he did get $495,000 from his first wife's policy following her 1995 death.Truman reminded the court that "claims on Sandra's death were paid after the Douglas County Sheriff investigation was over," but did not mention anything about the sheriff’s office decision to reopen the investigation following Toni’s death."I'm sure when all the facts are known in this difficult and complex case, justice will be done," Truman told ABC News after his client's arrest Thursday.

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People Call 911 After Getting Lost in World’s Biggest Corn Maze

People Call 911 After Getting Lost in World’s Biggest Corn Maze

iStock/Thinkstock(DIXON, Calif.) -- Some people daring enough to enter the largest corn maze in the world were getting so lost they had to call 911 for help, police said.The Solano County Sheriff's Office released those 911 calls to ABC News, revealing how frantic visitors to Cool Patch Pumpkins in Dixon, California, became when they couldn't find the edge of the 60-acre maze."I don't know what to do anymore. We've been in here like four hours," one caller said.

Another woman told the dispatcher she had been stuck with her two kids for hours.Yet another caller worried that the maze would close and leave him stranded."We're stuck and they close at 10," he said in a 911 call. "We're very worried and we can't find a way out."Deputy Daryl Snedeker, a spokesman for the Solano County Sheriff's Office, said such calls come every year, and people shouldn't be concerned."We have a good working relationship with the owner of the corn maze, so our dispatch finds him and he goes out and finds them," Snedeker said, noting that deputies never had to visit the maze this year to find someone.The sheriff's office got four or five calls this year, he said. The maze was mowed over this week as the season ended, Cool Patch Pumpkins wrote on its Facebook page.It's not uncommon for people to panic when they can't find their way out of a maze: A family called 911 when they got stuck in another corn maze in Massachusetts.At Cool Patch Pumpkins, Snedeker suggests that visitors next year remember to grab a map.

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