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‘Stunning’ Fireball in the Sky Caught on Camera

‘Stunning’ Fireball in the Sky Caught on Camera

Dan Perjar(RALEIGH, N.C.) — A North Carolina man driving down a street Thursday night caught footage of a fireball in the sky that was apparently visible to people in at least six other states.Dan Perjar, a software developer at North Carolina State University, recorded the meteor on his dash cam while driving on I-440 from Cary, North Carolina, toward the Raleigh campus around 10:17 p.m. Thursday.”When it first appeared, it honestly looked like someone had shot some fireworks off in their backyard; it was that stunning,” the Raleigh resident told ABC News. “I quickly realized it was much larger and much further away when it exploded and lit up the clouds beneath it.””It streaked with a definite green and gold color as it broke up in its descent,” Perjar said. “It seemed to explode multiple times.”Perjar, who said he watched a documentary about the Chelyabinsk meteor just days before, knew the fireball was likely a meteor.More than 95 reports of the fireball came in between 10:12 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET from people across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, according to the American Meteor Society.Sightings were reported in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, D.C. and West Virginia.“There was a very bright light at the beginning of the event: looked like lightning, but then I turned and saw the fireball descending and fragmenting,” Matthew K. of Chesapeake, Virginia, reported to the meteor society.Amanda K. of Baily, North Carolina wrote, “It was crazy, I had no idea what I had seen,” describing the meteor as a “white ball with slight blue outline with white glowing trail.”Matt S. of Clayton, Delaware, reported that seeing the fireball was “truly an amazing sight. [A] once in a lifetime experience I’ll never forget.”Perjar agreed that it was quite the experience: “It’s definitely the most interesting thing I’ve caught on my dash cam yet.”

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Sisters Lost at Sea for Eight Hours While Paddleboarding

Sisters Lost at Sea for Eight Hours While Paddleboarding

iStock/Thinkstock(HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.) — Two vacationing sisters who took off from Tybee Island, Georgia, Tuesday on their first-ever paddleboarding experience ended up in Hilton Head, South Carolina, after spending a harrowing eight hours lost at sea.Cayci and Summer Underwood had just taken off around 12:30 p.m. Tuesday when they say the wind picked up and the choppy waters knocked them off their paddleboards.“The current got really bad and then we thought, you know, this is picking up and there’s no way we’re going to make it back,” Summer, 21, told ABC News.As the Tennessee sisters held onto their boards, and kept in sight of each other, the conditions worsened.“Eventually, the choppiness turned into waves, very big waves,” Cayci, 27, said.The sisters became separated at one point with the current pushing them, “further and further apart,” Summer said.The pair managed to find each other and then stuck together for the rest of their eight-hour ordeal, comforting each other through the pain of sunburn and chafing against their paddleboards.“We just came to realize that there was really nothing we could do,” Cayci said.The sisters say they saw several shrimping boats as they floated in the sea but none saw them. They ultimately made the lifesaving decision to ditch their paddleboards and swim to shore, even though they had no idea where that shore would be.”We couldn’t see any sight of land or anything,” Summer said.The Underwoods swam their way to what turned out to be Hilton Head Island’s South Beach, a destination eight miles from their original launch point of Tybee Island.”There were people on the shore, but we ended up swimming all the way to them,” Cayci recalled.The sisters were helped by people on shore and taken to a local hospital for treatment. They were treated for shock and exhaustion and the chafing from the paddleboards.Now back home in Tennessee, the Underwoods said they do not plan to ever paddleboard again but will always retain the bond they forged in the sea.”Nobody can compete with the bond that we have now,” Cayci said, ”and we’ve literally fought for our lives together.”
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FedEx Indicted in Prescription Drug Delivery Investigation

FedEx Indicted in Prescription Drug Delivery Investigation

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) — Delivery company FedEx faces charges for its role in distributing controlled substances and prescription drugs, officials announced Thursday. A federal grand jury in San Francisco, California indicted the company for its involvement with illegal Internet pharmacies. Such groups, beginning in 1998, don’t require a prescription before filling orders for drugs and instead provided products based on an online questionnaire. The practices violated federal and state laws on the distribution of controlled substances, according to U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag. As early as 2004, the Drug Enforcement Administration, Food and Drug Administration, and members of Congress reportedly informed FedEx that illegal pharmacies were using its shipping services, according to an indictment. The company subsequently established a policy requiring all online pharmacy shippers to be approved by the Credit Department, and also created a related sales policy. Officials allege, however, that FedEx knew it was “delivering drugs to dealers and addicts.” Couriers in Kentucky, Tennnessee, and Virginia expressed safety concerns to senior management, including claims that trucks were stopped on the road by online pharmacy customers demanding pills, or that delivery addresses were parking lots or vacant homes. In response, the company created a procedure where such packages were held for pickup at specific stations rather than dropped off. Still, the company knew of the dealings and continued its affiliations. “The advent of Internet pharmacies allowed the cheap and easy distribution of massive amounts of illegal prescription drugs to every corner of the United States, while allowing perpetrators to conceal their identities through the anonymity the Internet provides,” Haag said. “This indictment highlights the importance of holding corporations that knowingly enable illegal activity responsible for their role in aiding criminal behavior.”
In response to Thursday’s indictment, FedEx Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications Patrick Fitzgerald said the privacy of its customers is at risk based on the charges. “FedEx is innocent of the charges brought today by the Department of Justice,” Fitzgerald said. “We will plead not guilty.  We will defend against this attack on the integrity and good name of FedEx and its employees.”Company representatives are scheduled to appear in court on July 29.
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Family Friend Shocked Teen with ‘Potential, Morals’ Turned Murderer

Family Friend Shocked Teen with ‘Potential, Morals’ Turned Murderer

iStock/Thinkstock(STAR CITY, W. Va.) — A close family friend of Rachel Shoaf, one of two teens now in prison for stabbing 16-year-old Skylar Neese to death, said that she is still reeling from the fact that a young girl she helped raise, whom she described as having a lot of promise, is a convicted murderer.“There was never any sign. Not a mean kid, not a bully, didn’t torture animals, and it’s been a long two years trying to come to grips,” Kelly Kerns told ABC News’ 20/20. “With all of the potential and morals, I don’t even get where this came from.“This is just so bizarre,” she continued. “I don’t care how you look at it. How you spin it. We’re normal people.”Kerns said she is an aunt-like figure for Shoaf, who she said she has loved like a daughter for the past 18 years. Since first holding her moments after she was born, Kerns said she has played an active role in Shoaf’s life.“I’m not kidding, she was the only baby I was ever going to have,” Kerns said.She described the now 18-year-old as an adventurous, happy child who was blossoming into a young woman full of promise and potential.“She loved life and there was no reason for her not to,” she said. “People around her loved her.”But that future came to a screeching halt in early 2013, when then-16-year-old Shoaf admitted her role in a horrific crime that shook the close-knit Morgantown, West Virginia, community to its core. For six agonizing months, residents were shocked over the mysterious disappearance of another sociable teen, Skylar Neese.Neese, Shoaf and a third girl, Sheila Eddy, were all students at University High in Morgantown. The trio was inseparable. Kerns fondly recalled the excitement surrounding Shoaf’s 15th birthday when she had the opportunity to meet her two new best friends, Neese and Eddy.“They were two, adorable little girls smiling up at me,” Kerns said.But Kerns said she began noticing some changes in Shoaf’s behavior, including sneaking out, smoking marijuana and skipping class. At the time, Kerns said she thought they were just typical teenage antics, and despite her worrisome behavior, Kerns said Shoaf kept her grades up, stayed involved in the school theater program and continued to take singing, piano and acting lessons.By the summer of 2012, however, Kerns said she and Shoaf spent less “quality time” together. But on the morning of July 6, 2012, she said the teen made a last-minute decision to spend the day on her boat with her and Shoaf’s mother, Patricia. The young redhead grew up spending her summers on Kerns’ boat, learning how to watertube and swim.While on the boat, Kerns said Patricia Shoaf mentioned that her daughter’s friend, Skylar Neese, had been missing, but Kerns said she didn’t note anything strange in Rachel Shoaf’s demeanor.“I mean she was texting all the time. But you see so much of that it didn’t really faze us,” she said.The next day, Shoaf left for a scheduled away trip to a church camp.Days turned into weeks and weeks turned into months and Neese still has not been found. As her disappearance continued to consume the Morgantown area, Shoaf returned from camp and school was back in session.As a substitute teacher, Kerns said she started hearing countless rumors about what happened to Neese, who was caught on surveillance video climbing out of her bedroom window after midnight July 6, 2012, never to be seen again.The most alarming rumor, by far, Kerns said, was that Shoaf and Eddy were with Neese the night of her disappearance. Even more unnerving for Kerns was the realization that she had spent the day with Shoaf on her boat hours after Neese vanished.“The story starts unraveling, and we find out they were together,” she said. “It just keeps evolving from searches of the house, of the schools. The girls ended up having to be homeschooled because of all the talk. And the FBI, you know, searched their lockers and took computers. …We knew the girls knew something.”But nothing could prepare Kerns for what came next. Shortly after Christmas 2012, Shoaf suffered an apparent nervous breakdown and was briefly hospitalized. After her release, Shoaf confessed to police that she and Eddy were responsible for Neese’s disappearance, had brutally stabbed her to death and left her body in the woods in Pennsylvania.She also led authorities to the murder scene, located across state lines in Brave, Pennsylvania and recounted how she and Eddy meticulously planned to kill their best friend.Both were charged as adults. Shoaf pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to 30 years on Feb. 26, 2014, with the possibility of parole in 10 years. Eddy pleaded guilty to first-degree murder for her role in Neese’s death and was sentenced to life in prison on Jan. 24, 2014, with the possibility of parole in 15 years.Although Kerns said her relationship with Shoaf and her mother has been strained since the sentencing, she hopes to remain a part of their lives.“I still love this child,” Kerns said. “You can’t stop loving a child,” Kerns said.She said she has twice visited Shoaf since her incarceration but the two have never spoken of the murder. Shoaf lives lodged in a juvenile facility but will be transferred to an adult facility near the end of the month.“I’m absolutely freaking out about her going to an adult prison,” Kerns said. “I’m scared to death for her, but I understand Skylar was scared, too.”
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Dethroned Miss Delaware Amanda Longacre Files $3 Million Lawsuit

Dethroned Miss Delaware Amanda Longacre Files $3 Million Lawsuit

iStock/Thinkstock(DOVER, Del.) — The Delaware beauty queen who lost her pageant crown because she was deemed too old to compete reportedly has filed a $3 million lawsuit against state pageant officials and the Miss America organization.Amanda Longacre was stripped of the Miss Delaware title last month after officials with the national Miss America organization discovered she would turn 25 in October, a violation of the contract pageant officials say Longacre signed prior to the June 14 Miss Delaware pageant stipulating she would not turn 25 before Dec. 31, 2014.In a lawsuit filed this week in Delaware, Longacre is seeking to be reinstated as Miss Delaware and to be allowed to compete in the Miss America pageant in September, local media reported.Longacre, who had been pursuing a master’s degree at the University of Pennsylvania prior to her win, was also seeking $500,000 in damages for herself, claiming she lost potential career enhancements, spent over $4,500 on expenses like makeup and coaching and cut her work hours in order to make pageant appearances, the Delaware News Journal reported.She was also reportedly seeking $2.5 million for other contestants who she claimed were recruited to compete in pageants in order to boost participation and then disqualified for being too old, the newspaper added.ABC News was not immediately able to reach Longacre or her attorney, Mark Billion, for comment.A new Miss Delaware, Brittany Lewis, also 24 and the original first runner-up to Longacre, was crowned June 26, just days after Longacre was told she was disqualified.Officials with the national Miss America organization confirmed to ABC News that they plan to fight Longacre’s lawsuit but will still give her the full $9,000 in scholarship money they pledged to her after she was disqualified.”Although we are disappointed to learn of the legal actions, we will plan to defend our position on the basis that this case has no merit,” a Miss America spokeswoman told ABC News by email. “We also plan to provide the previously committed scholarship to Ms. Longacre as scholarship is core to our mission and we respect Ms. Longacre’s pursuit of her education.”Miss America officials last month blamed the error on state pageant officials who, they said, missed the age discrepancy in Longacre’s submitted paperwork.“When the contract arrived in the national office and her birth date arrived we realized a mistake had been made on behalf of the Delaware pageant,” Miss American Chairman and CEO Sam Haskell told ABC News. “I don’t know how they missed it and I don’t know how she missed it.”Miss Delaware Executive Director Debi Wilson also did not reply to ABC News’ request for comment.According to the Delaware News Journal, Longacre’s lawsuit claimed that after she was dethroned, Wilson, “offered to make it up to her by hosting a wine and cheese pajama party.””I’m being treated as if I did something morally and ethically wrong,” Longacre told the paper. “I’m just really heartbroken.”
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Emotional Warning From Father of Woman Killed in GM Car

Emotional Warning From Father of Woman Killed in GM Car

General Motors(WASHINGTON) — Lara Gass, 27, was headed to work in March when her 2004 Saturn Ion rear-ended a tractor-trailer on a Virginia highway. Her airbag failed to deploy.The third-year law student at Washington and Lee University was driving a car that was recalled due to a faulty ignition switch, which can shut off car power and airbags without warning.In February, General Motors recalled more than 2.6 million vehicles due to the problem. At least 13 people have died due to reasons linked to the problem.Jay Gass said he received the recall notice in the mail one month before his daughter’s death. In an emotional interview with ABC News, Jay Gass said, “GM is relying on a piece of paper through the United States Postal Service to make it to an address that they have on file for that car and maybe not even the driver of that car.”“I tried to get the car fixed, but I couldn’t. They didn’t have the parts,” he said.After his daughter was killed, Gass received another letter from the automaker saying they now had the parts.Jay Gass and his wife Gerri were among the families of victims of the GM crashes who were on Capitol Hill Thursday to hear GM CEO Mary Barra testify before Congress for the fourth time.On Wednesday, Barra declined to meet with victims’ families while she was in D.C., but Jay Gass still had some questions for her.“I would ask her what her definition of leadership is because I have about nine criteria of leadership and one of them is integrity and we know that GM at this point has zero integrity,” he said.Gass said he believes no one is safe while these cars are still on the road. “These cars on the road next to you. These cars are coming at you in the other lane. They are like Scud missiles. They could stop at any moment,” he warned.Disappointed with GM’s handling of the recall, Gass has resorted to warning drivers of recalled vehicles when he sees them at the gas pump.From the moment he heard about his daughter’s death, he and his family decided to celebrate their daughter’s life, albeit too short, Gass said Wednesday, ahead of the congressional hearing.Choking back tears, Gass said, “Parents’ job is to protect their children. GM is not allowing me to protect my child.”
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Feds Add Agents to Combat Gun Violence in Chicago

Feds Add Agents to Combat Gun Violence in Chicago

Alex Wong/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — Following a spike in gun violence in the Windy City, the Department of Justice will send seven additional agents to Chicago in an effort to curb crime, Attorney General Eric Holder announced Thursday.Representatives from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) will join 45 agents currently in the city. “The Department of Justice will continue to do everything in its power to help the city of Chicago combat gun violence,” Holder said. “These new agents are a sign of the federal government’s ongoing commitment to helping local leaders ensure Chicago’s streets are safe.”The decision comes after the Attorney General’s recent visit, where he attended a roundtable discussion with Mayor Rahm Emanuel to address youth crime rates.The addition of agents is the latest step from law enforcement to beef up the fight against illegal gun trafficking, preceded by the opening of Chicago’s Crime Gun Intelligence Center and joint efforts from Illinois State Police and ATF. Gun crime is the primary root of area homicides, according to officials, with 60 percent of weapons recovered in violent crimes originally sold in other states and trafficked in the city. Currently, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has 120 agents in the Chicago, with 20 focusing on gang violence.
“ATF’s commitment to targeting traffickers and trigger pullers in Chicago is bolstered by these additional resources,” said ATF Director B. Todd Jones.  “These resources, combined with ATF’s Crime Gun Intelligence Center, will strengthen and build on our outstanding partnership with the Chicago Police Department and other local, state and regional law enforcement to bring safety and justice back to the community.”
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Three Dead After California Bank Robbery Turns into Gun Battle

Three Dead After California Bank Robbery Turns into Gun Battle

iStock/Thinkstock(STOCKTON, Calif.) — Robbers fleeing a California bank took three women hostage and led police on a chase that reached speeds of 100 mph, ending when three people were shot dead, including one of the hostages, authorities said.During the 45-minute chase, two of the hostages were tossed out of the moving car, authorities said.The violence erupted in Stockton, a city in the northern part of the state. Authorities say three robbers at Bank of the West made off with money and the three female hostages.Police say the suspects stole a bank employee’s SUV and fired AK-47-type assault weapons at pursuing police. At least 14 cars and many homes were struck by stray bullets, Police Chief Eric Jones told a news conference late Wednesday. The chase ended in a bloody shootout that left the SUV riddled with bullet holes. All of the alleged bank robbers were shot, two of them dead. The surviving suspect was identified by police as Jaime Ramos, 19. He was charged with homicide, kidnapping, robbery, and attempted murder charges. Police did not identify the two dead suspects, but said they were 30 and 27 and were “documented gang members.”One hostage, identified by her family as Misty Holt-Singh, also died in the car, with police saying she appears to have been used by the suspects as a human shield during the shootout.The women who were thrown from the car both have bullet wounds and are hospitalized, police said.
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Rental Car or Marijuana Dumping Ground?

Rental Car or Marijuana Dumping Ground?

iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) — Denver International Airport rental cars appear to be increasingly used as a marijuana dumping ground for travelers. People who want to avoid illegally bringing pot into the airport simply leave it in the car or offer it to the car rental agencies, one Avis Rent A Car airport agent said Thursday.“We see quite a few cases,” the 18-year Avis employee in Denver, declining to give her name, told ABC News. “We basically don’t touch it. Usually, the manager will take it and flush it down the toilet.“We are a drug-free environment. We don’t take it or give it back; we just flush it.”Recreational marijuana use by adults 21 and older has been legal in Colorado since late 2012. Possession of up to 1 ounce is OK, but it’s illegal to take any amount out of the state.So some customers offer their leftovers to the rental agents.“I have had customers come up to the counter and give it to us, asking ‘Do you want it?’” the Avis rental agent said, adding that she immediately declines and offers to help the customer dispose of it.Denver International spokesman Heath Montgomery said the facility’s formal policy is that “marijuana is not allowed on airport property.”The airport has seen sixteen cases this year of individuals trying to get marijuana through security to take with them, which Montgomery cites as infinitesimally small when compared to the 25 million passengers to date who have passed through.“No one has been cited,” Montgomery said. “We usually just have them toss it in the trash.”Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Memorial for CIA’s Fallen Marks Somber 40-Year Anniversary

Memorial for CIA’s Fallen Marks Somber 40-Year Anniversary

The Central Intelligence Agency(WASHINGTON) — Last May, Kate Quigley sat in the lobby of the CIA headquarters and stared at a star freshly carved out of a marble slab on the wall.The star was hammered out of the stone of the Agency’s Memorial Wall in honor of Quigley’s brother, former Navy SEAL and CIA contractor Glen Doherty, who died alongside fellow ex-SEAL and agency contractor Tyrone Woods as they protected Americans at a CIA outpost in Benghazi, Libya on Sept. 11, 2012.The stars for Doherty and Woods joined a solemn, growing constellation. One is etched for each of the dozens of people who have died in the service of the agency over the years. Their names are recorded in the CIA’s Book of Honor, except for many whose identities are kept secret to this day. For instance, the CIA officially has still not publicly acknowledged that Doherty and Woods were working for the agency when they died.Still, Quigley said that seeing the star on the wall for her brother, even in a closed ceremony, was “extremely powerful.”“While no one wants to have a family member represented on the wall, it is one of the traditions and ceremonies that make this country so amazing,” Quigley told ABC News by email. “Our family remains humbled by the sacrifice of all these great men and our pride and sadness for Glen is something we carry with us each day.”This month marks the Memorial Wall’s 40th anniversary. The CIA says it was originally carved to little fanfare in 1974 with 31 stars for those who had died since the CIA’s establishment in 1947. The name associated with the first star, Douglas Mackiernan, died back in 1950, though his name was only revealed in 2006, according to a CIA report.Today there are 111 stars on the Memorial Wall, 31 of which are there for men and women whose names are still classified. Four were added before this May’s annual CIA memorial ceremony.Jack Devine, who served in CIA clandestine operations for more than 30 years, said he personally  knows several people represented on the wall, “all of [whom] perished under extraordinary circumstances,” and said he personally conducted a ceremony to honor a CIA pilot who crashed during the Bay of Pigs operation.“There is a purity and simplicity about [the CIA lobby] and as you walk through the door, the most stunning impression is of the stars etched in the wall honoring CIA’s fallen warriors,” Devine told ABC News. “I have watched those stars increase over my years in the Agency and afterwards…It’s hard to walk by those stars and not have a sense of pride and loss.”
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Actress Who Sent Ricin to Obama Sentenced to 18 Years

Actress Who Sent Ricin to Obama Sentenced to 18 Years

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Shannon Guess Richardson, the Texas woman who pleaded guilty to sending ricin-laced letters to President Obama and then-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg in the spring of 2013, was sentenced Wednesday to 18 years in prison.Richardson will also have to pay $367,000 in restitution for ordering the components to make the ricin and mailing the letters.When news of the ricin letters first came to light, Richardson, 36, falsely implicated her estranged husband, Nathan Richardson, who was never charged in the case.Richardson, an actress, has had small roles in TV shows and films, including The Vampire Diaries, Franklin & Bash, The Change-Up and The Walking Dead.At the sentencing, Richardson told the judge, “I never intended for anybody to be hurt. I’m not a bad person. I don’t have it in me to hurt anyone.”She added, “I do love my country, and I respect my president.”Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Judge Declares California’s Death Penalty Is Unconstitutional

Judge Declares California’s Death Penalty Is Unconstitutional

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(SANTA ANA, Calif.) — California’s death penalty was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge Wednesday, who blamed the “dysfunctional administration” of the system for indefinite delays in executing death row inmates.Judge Cormac J. Carney of the U.S. District Court concluded that these death sentences wind up being “life in prison, with the remote possibility of death.”Although more than 900 people have been sentenced to die in California since 1975, there have been just 13 executions.While the ruling by Carney vacates the 1995 death sentence of Ernest Dewayne Jones, who was convicted of raping and murdering his girlfriend’s mother, it doesn’t bind other judges or other courts in the state to do the same.According to the judge, the delay in execution amounts to a violation of “the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.”
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At Least Three Dead in California Bank Robbery and Police Chase

At Least Three Dead in California Bank Robbery and Police Chase

iStock/Thinkstock(STOCKTON, Calif.) — At least three people are dead following a violent bank robbery and high-speed police chase in Stockton, California. Two suspects and a hostage lost their lives in Wednesday’s incident. Three Latino men took three women hostage following the robbery at Bank of the West. During the chase, which took law enforcement through the areas of Lodi and Stockton, the suspects continually shot at officers with AK-47 style rifles, according to police. “Both communities were at huge risk and top concerns were the hostages, but also the suspects taking more hostages or killing uninvolved people,” Stockton Police said in a statement. During the pursuit, one woman was thrown from the car and another hostage was later shot and tossed from the vehicle. The chase ended following a “large exchange of gunfire.” An investigation is underway.
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Passenger Arrested After Bomb Threat on British Airways Flight

Passenger Arrested After Bomb Threat on British Airways Flight

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) — A Hawaii man could face up to 20 years in federal prison after authorities said he threatened to kill several flight attendants and claimed to have a bomb while on board a British Airways flight from London to Los Angeles.FBI agents arrested Kevin Mosele, of Kihei, Hawaii, at Los Angeles International Airport on Monday and charged him with interference with a flight crew, which carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.According to the arrest affidavit, Mosele, 20, told FBI agents he had several drinks during a nine-hour layover in London before boarding his Los Angeles-bound flight. After he was approached about his behavior about two hours into the flight, Mosele threatened several flight attendants, saying, “I am going to f****** kill you,” “I am going to open this door,” and “I am going to set off a bomb.”A flight attendant who tried calming Mosele said his eyes were bloodshot and he “seemed to be intoxicated,” according to the affidavit. Another flight attendant found two small wine bottles and two small whiskey bottles near Mosele’s seat. Neither bottle was sold on the flight, the flight attendant told FBI agents.When the plane’s captain warned Mosele about his behavior, he mocked him, saying, “Ooo, El Capitan, can I pretend to be a stewardess?” a passenger told the FBI, according to the affidavit. The passenger added that Mosele dared the captain to divert the flight, saying, “You won’t land for just one person.”Four flight attendants later handcuffed and restrained Mosele. He struggled despite being handcuffed and spit on two of the flight attendants, saying, “You better let me out or I am going to kill you and open the aircraft door,” and, “I will find you on Facebook and kill you,” according to the affidavit.He admitted to threatening the flight attendants and cursing at them, saying he just went “crazy” when he was restrained, according to the affidavit.Mosele allegedly apologized while speaking with FBI agents, saying, “It’s all my fault,” and, “I’m mad at myself.”He also told FBI agents he had been talking and joking with the female flight attendants before he was approached about his behavior, according to the affidavit.Mosele appeared in federal court Tuesday, where he was freed on $10,000 bond. His arraignment was scheduled for Aug. 4.ABC News could not immediately reach Mosele for comment Wednesday evening.
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From Best Friends to Killers: Teens Murder Friend Because They ‘Didn’t Like Her’

From Best Friends to Killers: Teens Murder Friend Because They ‘Didn’t Like Her’

iStock/Thinkstock(STAR CITY, W. Va.) — When 16-year-old Skylar Neese snuck out of her Star City, West Virginia, home after midnight on July 6, 2012, she never returned.Six months after her disappearance, one of Neese’s best friends from high school, Rachel Shoaf confessed to authorities that she had stabbed Neese to death with their other friend, Sheila Eddy, and then led police to Neese’s remains in a wooded area over the Pennsylvania state line.On Jan. 24, 2014, Eddy pleaded guilty to first-degree murder for her role in Skylar’s death and was sentenced to life in prison. Shoaf was sentenced to 30 years the following month. Both were charged as adults.Prior to Shoaf’s confession, Neese’s parents and the police had frantically searched for answers in her disappearance. Up until that point, Shoaf and Eddy, the last people to see Neese alive, had denied knowing what had happened to their friend.The three high school sophomores had been inseparable, but in the days leading up to her death, Neese’s Twitter account showed that something had gone awry. On July 4, 2012, two days before she was murdered, Neese tweeted “it really doesn’t take much to p*** me off” and “sick of being at f****** home. Thanks “friends,” love hanging out with you all too.” The day before she was killed, Neese tweeted, “you doing s*** like that is why I can NEVER completely trust you.”Neese’s last tweet, sent out hours before she snuck out of her bedroom window after midnight on July 6, 2012, was a retweet from a friend who had posted, “All I do is hope.”Before the truth about Neese’s disappearance was revealed, Sheila Eddy remained active on social media, tweeting regularly about her thoughts and day-to-day activities as authorities searched for her “missing” friend. In hindsight of Neese’s murder, several of the posts from Eddy seem disturbing.Eddy’s first tweet on July 7, 2012, the day after she and Shoaf killed Neese, was message to a friend wishing her a happy birthday.
 

happpy birthdayy @young_muffintop!
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) July 7, 2012

 
In the months that followed, Eddy regularly tweeted about watching TV, school, hating homework and other typical teenage things. She even tweeted about her and Shoaf’s close friendship:
 

#tweetapicturethatdescribesyourfriendship @_racchh pic.twitter.com/oiqn6r7Q
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) October 31, 2012

 
 
 

no one on this earth can handle me and rachel if you think you can you’re wrong
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) November 5, 2012

 
Then, on January 3, 2013, Shoaf confessed to stabbing Neese to death with Eddy and told authorities where they had left her body. Meanwhile, Eddy kept up appearances that everything was normal, tweeting about watching her favorite TV shows:
 

staying home on tuesday is the best cause law and order svu is on all day
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) January 8, 2013

 
On the morning of March 13, 2013, the U.S. Attorney’s Office publicly announced the human remains found in the wooded area in Brave, Pennsylvania, belonged to Skylar Neese. Eddy, still keeping up appearances, pretended to be devastated over the news that her friend had been found dead, tweeting “Rest easy Skylar, you’ll ALWAYS be my best friend,” with a photo montage of her and Neese together, and “worst day of my whole life.”
 

rest easy skylar, you’ll ALWAYS be my bestfriend. i miss you more than you could ever know. pic.twitter.com/g6UaDf9Vfb
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) March 13, 2013

 
 
 

worst day of my whole life
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) March 13, 2013

 
During her confession in January 2013, Shoaf had told authorities she and Eddy had planned Neese’s murder while in science class together. The plan was to pick Neese up from her house at night and drive to a remote area to smoke marijuana together. Once they were in the woods, Shoaf said the plan was to count to three, then stab Neese to death.
On March 30, 2013, about a month before she was arrested for Neese’s murder, Eddy tweeted “we really did go on three.”
 

we really did go on three
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) April 1, 2013

 
The following day, she tweeted:
 
 

we really did go on three
— shelia eddy (@_sheliiaa) April 1, 2013

 
Watch the full story on ABC News’ 20/20 on Friday, July 18 at 10 P.M. ET
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Drivers Try to Put Brakes on Cities’ Speed Traps

Drivers Try to Put Brakes on Cities’ Speed Traps

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Across America, tourists and drivers are fighting back against speed traps, something that one retired police officer called “a dirty, little secret” among cities and counties.“I said to myself that when I got a chance to speak out about it, I would,” said Kurt Skarjune, a retired Detroit-area officer. “It’s like a dirty, little secret but it’s really not a secret, but it certainly is dirty.”Skarjune said that local governments made big money from speed traps, which he described as shooting fish in a barrel. The average ticket: about $150.Drivers have reported more than 82,000 speed traps since 2000 to the National Speed Trap Exchange, warning other families on the roads.Houston, Texas, ranks No. 1 in reported speed traps, with nearly 500 since 2000, but the police lights are flashing all over the country.On a five-mile stretch of US 69 in Oklahoma, police in the community of Stringtown, population about 400, wrote so many speeding tickets that a few months ago, the state prohibited the department from writing any more.In Linndale, Ohio, the tiny town of less than 200 collected $800,000 in speeding tickets before a court stepped in.Along Interstate 10, in the middle of Cajun country, 80 percent of the budget for Henderson, Louisiana, was covered by speeding tickets handed out at the bottom of the bridge.A class-action suit, brought by drivers, was filed last year, alleging that the police had been paid extra for writing tickets.“The law of this state clearly states that one may not be paid based on the number of tickets that are issued,” said St. Martin Parish Assistant District Attorney Chester Cedars.
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California Residents Face Fines as State Seeks to Reduce Water Use

California Residents Face Fines as State Seeks to Reduce Water Use

iStock/Thinkstock(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Across the West, an historic drought — the worst in more than a century — has sparked a water crisis that for the first time has forced California officials to impose mandatory statewide water restrictions.“We need water,” Gov. Gerry Brown said Wednesday. “We’re gonna have to get water.”There have no been no fewer than a dozen raging wildfires, from Idaho and Oregon to Arizona, Washington and Nevada.The Bully Fire in Northern California chewed through 10-square miles and destroyed eight homes. The landscape has become a tinderbox and water reservoirs are now bone dry. About 2,200 firefighters have been working hard to keep the flames away.Nevada’s Lake Mead is now at its lowest point since the Hoover Dam was built, officials said.In Wedneday’s announcement, officials in California announced that it was illegal to let sprinkler systems flow into the street, hose down sidewalks and driveways or use an open hose to wash your car.“I think my husband has been guilty of coming out late at night and doing a little secretive watering underneath the trees,” resident Pam Ferko said.Violators face fines of up to $500 a day.Previously, residents had ignored the governor’s pleas to cutback — statewide, water usage actually went up — so now Californians are being encouraged to rat out their neighbors.“Our water complaint calls have gone up exponentially from the last two years,” said Terrance Davis of the state’s Department of Utilities.Lawn sprinklers and car washes aren’t the only culprits though.Agriculture uses 80 percent of the state’s water. The drought is projected to cost $2 billion in crop losses this year, which will mean higher food prices nationwide.
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Casino Boat Passengers Evacuated After Being Stranded All Night

Casino Boat Passengers Evacuated After Being Stranded All Night

U.S. Coast Guard(NEW YORK) — Coast Guard crews on Wednesday evacuated people from the maiden voyage of a nighttime casino cruise after they were forced to spend the night when the ship got stuck on rocks near the coast of Georgia, the U.S. Coast Guard said.Tradewinds Casino Cruise’s Escapade ship, with 96 passengers and 27 crew members, has been stranded since around midnight in South Carolina’s Calibogue Sound. The Coast Guard members removed people from the ship after towlines broke in their initial attempts to free the ship and get it back into the water.Cady Clark, 23, spoke to ABC News from the cruise line’s dock in Savannah, Georgia, where she waited for her dad, who was a passenger aboard the ship.”They’re still taking all of the passengers from the ship to the Coast Guard station at Tybee Island and then they’re supposed to be, I’m guessing, busing them back to the docks because all of their vehicles are here,” she said at the time.Clark said her father, Mark Eaton, had been looking forward to taking the Escapade’s first cruise, but she isn’t sure whether he’ll venture out on the ship again.She added that her dad is an Afghanistan veteran who suffered a back injury during a hard helicopter landing and needs pain medication. She and her mother rushed to the dock with the meds when he called them Wednesday morning from another passenger’s cellphone. Two other families were waiting there, too, she said.”The mood with the families here, everyone has kind of got the sigh of relief right now, now that we’ve heard from the families,” Clark said. “Everything’s lightened up.”The cruise was supposed to run from 7 p.m. until 12:30 a.m., according to the company’s website. It’s still stranded, about two miles from Tybee Island in Georgia.There are no reports of injuries.Crews first attempted to move the boat around noon once water levels reached high tide, but the towlines broke, Petty Officer First Class Lauren Jorgensen said.More than 12 hours later, passengers were finally being ferried from the ship to smaller boats, and then taken to a large Coast Guard Cutter. Once all the passengers were aboard the cutter, they were taken to the U.S. Coast Guard base on Tybee Island.It’s not clear what conditions were on the boat overnight, but passengers probably weren’t gambling, Clark said.Gambling is only allowed in international waters, which start 3 nautical miles offshore, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ship was stranded 1.8 miles from shore, the U.S. Coast Guard said.
 

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Alleged Mexican Drug Cartel Thugs Kidnap American ‘Courier’ in SC

Alleged Mexican Drug Cartel Thugs Kidnap American ‘Courier’ in SC

FBI(WASHINGTON) — A kidnapping and ransom case in the Carolinas suggests just how active Mexican drug cartels have become in the U.S.On Wednesday, authorities identified three purported members of a Mexican drug cartel as the alleged kidnappers of a South Carolina man last week, according to a criminal complaint filed in U.S. District of Court of South Carolina.The American hostage, who authorities said was a drug courier for the cartel, apparently was kidnapped on July 9 and held for ransom, with demands for as much as $400,000 coming from unknown cartel members in Mexico.After nearly a week in captivity, the hostage was found chained and blindfolded, but alive, in a Roseboro, North Carolina, home.The criminal complaint alleged the kidnapping and ransom demands were triggered by the American courier’s loss of 200 pounds of marijuana.
The suspected courier, identified only as “ES” in the criminal complaint, “delivered 200 pounds [$200,000 worth] of marijuana to an unidentified customer. ES ‘fronted’ the marijuana to the customer, expecting payment at a later date; however the customer absconded with the with the marijuana and never made payment,” according to the complaint.In the days before the kidnapping, the FBI said, the purported cartel operatives demanded repayment for the missing marijuana from ES and his father, “SG” who also was allegedly working as a drug courier.When the father could not come up with the money, ES was pulled out of his truck at gunpoint the morning of July 9 in St. Matthews, South Carolina, and went missing, officials said.The truck was found still running with its doors open in a neighbor’s yard.Later in the day, ES’ fiance got a call saying that ES had been kidnapped and the caller demanded to talk to SG about a ransom.Police and federal agents were eventually able to trace the origin of that call to a number in Mexico and soon found that a Mexican-based phone had also placed calls to another number in the South Carolina area, officials said. It turned out that local number could be tracked to a man named Juan Manuel Fuentes-Morales, they added.Fuentes-Morales was allegedly using that phone to communicate with cartel leadership in Mexico, which was making decisions concerning what ransom demands would be made.The criminal complaint charged that between July 10 and July 15, the hostage-takers placed 13 calls to ES’ fiance and father.
The hostage takers “demanded ransom in amounts varying between $100,000 and $400,000,” according to the criminal complaint. In addition to the ransom money, according to officials, the kidnappers demanded the return of the “200,” referring to the 200 pounds of marijuana that had disappeared.Local law enforcement and the FBI were able to listen in on those calls and advised the fiance and father to demand “proof of life” from the kidnappers.It was the “proof of life” demand that helped break the case and find the hostage. The family asked the kidnappers to provide them with family information that only ES would know.Law enforcement agents listened in as the caller, allegedly Fuentes-Morales, called his purported bosses in Mexico and told them it would take at least 30 minutes to obtain the information from ES.Police were able to track the caller’s cellphone location as he drove to the home in Roseboro, North Carolina, where ES was being held, and then listened again as he called the family back with the answer to the “proof of life” question.Now, law enforcement closed the net. They obtained warrants for the locations in South and North Carolina and, at 5 a.m. Tuesday morning, the FBI’s elite hostage rescue team stormed a home in Roseboro, North Carolina, where they found ES and arrested Fuentes-Morales and two alleged accomplices, Ruben Ceja-Rangel and Luis Castro Villeda.The complex, international case ended up drawing a massive law enforcement response.“The cooperation among federal, local and state law enforcement agencies and across state lines was nothing short of incredible throughout this investigation,” David Thomas, the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Columbia, South Carolina, field office, said in a statement after the arrests. “The attention and resources contributed to this investigation should send a strong message that the FBI and its partners will not tolerate the kidnapping of American citizens.”Extensive resources were sent to the Charlotte and Columbia FBI field offices by FBI headquarters, including the Hostage Rescue Team, a highly trained group of special agents often called upon to respond to an extraordinary crisis. Crisis negotiators, multiple FBI SWAT teams, evidence response teams, analysts, technical specialists and other personnel were also sent to assist.The suspects made an initial appearance Wednesday morning at the federal courthouse in Raleigh, North Carolina, and will be transferred to South Carolina to stand trial.The only mystery left in this case was what really happened to that 200 pounds of marijuana: If ES was involved, was he ripped off or did he steal the grass himself? The FBI said the investigation into that aspect of the case was “ongoing.”
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Ex-Taliban POW Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl Has Hired a Lawyer

Ex-Taliban POW Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl Has Hired a Lawyer

U.S. Army via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the former Taliban POW who has just returned to active duty, has lawyered up, asking prominent military affairs attorney Eugene Fidell to take his case.Fidell, who teaches military justice at Yale Law School, told ABC News Wednesday that he has been representing Bergdahl for about a week and is working pro bono.“I think it’s important that people, particularly people who have been vilified have proper representation, and every lawyer has a responsibility to represent even unpopular clients and that’s why I’m involved in this,” Fidell told ABC News.
Bergdahl also has an Army lawyer who will be representing him, but he approached Fidell for additional help, Fidell said.The Army said when it put Bergdahl back on regular duty this week that it would continue to investigate the details of his capture by the Taliban in 2009. He was freed in a controversial swap of Taliban prisoners being held in Guantanamo earlier this year.Defense officials say an initial investigation completed in 2009 determined that Bergdahl had voluntarily left his outpost, though it could not determine his intent.Fidell met with Bergdahl last week, but won’t comment on his condition. Fidell also would not discuss whether he has spoken with Bergdahl’s parents. Since his return to the U.S., Bergdahl has declined to speak with his parents, defense officials said.The lawyer said that Bergdahl has not yet been interviewed by Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl who is heading the investigation into the circumstances surrounding Bergdahl’s disappearance from his Afghanistan outpost. Fidell said he spoke with Dahl Tuesday and they had a “cordial and professional” conversation and he looks forward to meeting him. He doesn’t anticipate Dahl will conduct substantive interviews with Bergdahl for a couple of weeks, and he’ll be present for the interviews.Bergdahl, 28, recently completed a lengthy reintegration process with the Army. He has been assigned a desk job at the headquarters of U.S. Army North at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. He has not been charged with any crimes and not been read his rights in anticipation of any charges, defense officials said this week.
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