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NM Environment Dept. Levies Fines Against US Dept. of Energy Related to Violations at Nuclear Facility

NM Environment Dept. Levies Fines Against US Dept. of Energy Related to Violations at Nuclear Facility

JulyVelchev/iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA FE, N.M.) -- The New Mexico Environment Department issued compliance orders penalizing the U.S. Department of Energy over $50 million on Saturday related to violations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Los Alamos National Laboratory."New Mexico is proud of our national labs and cutting-edge scientific facilities, and we have important rules in place to protect those facilities, the people who work there, and all New Mexicans," Gov. Susana Martinez said in a statement. In total, 37 violations were identified, including 13 at WIPP, the facility that was shut down earlier this year due to an underground fire and radiological release.The NMED says that the violations including improper handling of transuranic waste by the Department of Energy.

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16 Fall Ill on Philadelphia-Bound Flight from Israel

16 Fall Ill on Philadelphia-Bound Flight from Israel

US Airways(PHILADELPHIA) – A flight from Israel bound for Pennsylvania’s largest city had to be diverted after several people on-board fell ill.US Airways Flight 797 from Tel Aviv bound for Philadelphia made an emergency landing at 1:38 a.m. on Saturday in Rome, according to ABC News affiliate WPVI-TV. Two passengers and 14 crew members complained of an odor. They were treated and released from a Rome Hospital, WPVI-TV reports.The Airbus A-330 had 129 passengers and 14 crew members on-board at the time. Those passengers were transferred onto different flights.

The cause of the odor has yet to be determined.

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Kansas City Man Charged With Murder in Hit-And-Run Death of Teen

Kansas City Man Charged With Murder in Hit-And-Run Death of Teen

Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) –- A Kansas City man has been charged with first-degree murder for a crash that killed a 15-year-old boy. Abdisamad Sheikh-Hussein, 34, who went by the name Adam, was struck by a SUV driven by Admed Aden, outside a Kansas City mosque on Thursday.The 15-year-old later died at the hospital. Court documents obtained by ABC News affiliate KMBC-TV say Aden fled from the scene after the accident, and then waved a machete and what appeared to be a gun at people in the area before he was arrested.  Members of the Solmali mosque have said, Aden, who is also a Somali and Muslim, had threatened the mosque in the past:“He made it clear that he has a strong hatred towards Muslims. In general, the Somali community,” said Baker Abdalla, a member of the mosque.Aden was also charged with armed criminal action, and leaving a scene of an accident.

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Women Gets Mother’s Wedding Ring 55 Years after Fatal Plane Crash

Women Gets Mother’s Wedding Ring 55 Years after Fatal Plane Crash

David Philips/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -– Joyce Wharton, who lost her parents when their small plane crashed in a forest in Washington state 55 years ago, never thought she would see her mother's wedding ring again. The plane disappeared in 1959, and the wreckage wasn't found for 14 years, but even then the ring was not recovered and was thought to be lost. However, just this week Wharton, who lives in New Jersey, received a phone call from Nick Buchanan, a logger in Centralia, Wash., who had stumbled onto the ring in 1997 and connected it to the 1959 crash, according to ABC News affiliate WABC-TV. For years Buchanan had been looking for a family member so he could properly deliver the ring. "He was determined that he was going to give it back to a daughter or family member to give it back to," Wharton said after she spoke with him earlier this week. Wharton said Buchanan finally contacted her after he and his nephew searched the Internet. After a few conversations to ensure that Wharton was the right recipient, Buchanan mailed the ring and Wharton got it back on Wednesday. "It was almost like reaching out to touch my mom," Wharton told ABC News. "It was like reaching out to the past because the last time I saw the ring it was a couple of weeks before they left" on their flight. Wharton's parents Hazel and Hugh Armstrong, from San Antonio, Texas, had been on their way to see family when the plane crashed. Wharton was just 23 at the time and newly married. "Just in your heart you'd like to have your mother's wedding ring," Wharton said. "Something so special to your mom and dad. After all those years you don't think it's ever going to be possible." Wharton said she found it especially touching that she was able to get the ring back during the holiday season. "To get that phone call out of the blue... It's hard to find adjectives, because you're so full emotionally," she said. "It renews all those thoughts of my mom and my dad. It was just wonderful."

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Social Media Manhunt Finds Mystery Couple in Proposal Photo

Social Media Manhunt Finds Mystery Couple in Proposal Photo

HyperionPixels/iStock/Thinkstock(PORTLAND, Ore.) -- A newly-engaged Oregon couple was stunned to learn they had become the subject of a viral manhunt after an amateur photographer snapped a photo of their proposal. Alex Gensitskiy and his fiancee Katie Verkovod were hiking at Mt. Hood National Forest in Oregon on Thanksgiving day when he dropped to one knee and proposed, according to ABC News affiliate KATU-TV. When Paul Wolfe, who was hiking nearby, saw Gensitskiy on one knee offering up a ring, he snapped a photo on his phone while keeping a distance. The picture of the couple atop the hill in front of a foggy backdrop quickly went viral after Wolfe posted it to his Instagram and on Reddit in the hopes he could give the photo to the couple.

 

Happened upon a marriage proposal at Munra Point. If they make it down the slippery rocks okay, they might just have a chance. #thegorge #pnw #truelove

A photo posted by Paul Wolfe (@needsmorewolves) on Nov 11, 2014 at 4:53pm PST

Eventually, a friend called Gensitskiy after stumbling across the photo online. “He was like, 'Dude, this is crazy, there was a picture and it wen viral and people are looking for you,'” Gensitskiy told KATU-TV. “I was like, 'Whoa.'” Verkovod said the picture brought back some of the emotions she felt that day. “It was just beautiful,” she told KATU-TV. “It brought back so many good memories.” Gensitskiy said he remembered seeing people on the trail, but was nervous about getting through the proposal. “I hope they don’t come up to us,” Gensitskiy recalled thinking to KATU-TV. “I’m...about to propose. I don’t want people around.” The couple is now busy planning their wedding.

 

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Mystery Solved: Pony Found Wandering CA Street Reunited With Girl

Mystery Solved: Pony Found Wandering CA Street Reunited With Girl

KalSyer/iStock/Thinkstock(JURUPA VALLEY, Calif.) -- It's not every day that you see a Shetland pony with a braided mane wandering down the street -- so when one was corralled by a sheriff's deputy one morning on Galena Street in Jurupa Valley, California, it touched off a week-long mystery aimed at finding the owner. On Friday, the owner was found. Jorge Rodriguez, Olga Martin and their daughter, Jolette, 9, could not be happier to be reunited with their 16-year-old pony, Blossom. "My daughter, she was crying the whole week," Martin told ABC News. "She is with her [Blossom] right now. We're very, very happy not to see her crying anymore." Blossom was found wandering alone down Galena Street in Jurupa Valley around 6 a.m. on Nov. 25, officials said. “I was asleep and was wondering what was going on, then I discovered the horse in our yard,” said Edith Hernandez, whose mother allowed the sheriff's deputy to hold the pony in the family's property, according to a release by the Riverside County Department of Animal Services. "That's a relatively busy street on a midweek morning," Riverside County Department of Animal Services spokesperson John Welsh told ABC News. "[The deputy] was probably making sure the pony wasn't hit by a car or causing an accident." Rodriguez and his daughter said Blossom likely escaped that same morning after her gate was accidentally left open, ABC News station KABC-TV reported. Finding abandoned ponies and horses actually is not uncommon in Jurupa Valley. But Blossom was described in "beautiful" condition. Besides the braided mane, Blossom had a new halter and a healthy weight, estimated to be between 400 and 500 pounds. "Usually, when we impound a horse, it's skin and bone," Welsh told ABC News. "Someone has usually abandoned it in a field or riverbank. Not a beautiful Shetland." The Western Riverside County/City Animal Shelter assumed the pony to be someone's pet. But even after officials struck up a storm of interest on social media sites, and after numerous media outlets covered the slate-black beauty's story, no one came forward, the shelter said -- though the Rodriguez family said they called the shelter the day Blossom disappeared and was told she wasn't there. It was not immediately clear what caused the apparent mix-up.

 

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Four Stabbed, Including Conductor, on Amtrak Train

Four Stabbed, Including Conductor, on Amtrak Train

iStock/Thinkstock(NILES, Mich.) -- Four people were stabbed, including a conductor, on an Amtrak train Friday night and a suspect was taken into custody, police said.

The stabbing occurred about 7 p.m. in Niles, Mich.

Niles police said four people were stabbed in the attack. One of the victims was a train conductor, police said.

ABC News station WLS TV reported that two people were taken to Lakeland Healthcare Hospital in Niles. The hospital refused comment to ABC News.

The condition of the victims wasn't immediately known.

Amtrak said the train was the Blue Water service en route from Chicago to Port Huron. Alternative transportation was being arranged for the passengers.

The Berrien County Sheriff's Department said that Michael Darnell Williams, 44, was in custody in connection with the stabbing.

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Cleveland Cops ‘Recklessly’ Shot Boy, 12, Over Toy Gun, Suit Claims

Cleveland Cops ‘Recklessly’ Shot Boy, 12, Over Toy Gun, Suit Claims

iStock/Thinkstock(CLEVELAND) -- The family of a 12-year-old boy who was fatally shot by a Cleveland police officer over a toy gun have filed a federal lawsuit claiming the officers "recklessly" shot the boy and then failed to give him immediate medical care.The civil rights and wrongful death lawsuit was filed by a lawyer for the relatives of the boy, Tamir Rice.Officer Timothy Loehmann, who fired the fatal shots, Loehmann's partner Officer Frank Garmback and the City of Cleveland are all named as defendants in the suit.The suit accuses Loehmann and Garmback of acting "unreasonably, negligently, recklessly, wantonly, willfully, knowingly, intentionally, and with deliberate indifference to the safety and rights of Tamir Rice."It also accuses the officers of failing "to secure timely medical assistance."The suit does not specify how much money Rice’s relatives are asking for in compensation and damages but ask that the issue be brought before a jury.The lawsuit also attacks the policies of the City of Cleveland as a whole."Defendant City of Cleveland has a policy, practice and custom of using excessive force on African American citizens and that policy practice and custom was the moving force behind the excessive force used on Tamir Rice and proximately caused his suffering and death," the suit states.A U.S. Department of Justice settlement with Cleveland earlier this week concluded that the city's police department was poorly trained in the use of force and in need of sweeping reforms.Surveillance footage from the Nov. 22 shooting shows that the boy was shot within two seconds of the police patrol car arriving at the scene, near a recreational center."Defendants Loehmann and Garmback confronted him in a surprise fashion and fired multiple shots at him without any adequate investigation," the lawsuit states. "Four minutes passed without any medical care being provided to Tamir, who lay on the ground alive."The police were responding to a call from someone who said that there was an individual waving what appeared to be a gun at the playground. The lawsuit argues that the officers should have made more of an effort to investigate the matter before shooting the boy."Young boys playing with replica guns are commonplace in America and police are expected to approach them safely if an investigation is warranted, not shoot them dead within two seconds," the suit states.The suit comes one day after Loehmann's personnel file was released showing that his supervisors at a previous job determined he had emotional maturity issues, an inability to manage stress and “dismal” performance in firearms training.Loehmann spent five months in 2012 working for the Independence, Ohio, police department before moving to the Cleveland department, though the newly released review shows that his time on the Independence force was marred with problems. He resigned from that position after it was recommended that he be terminated.

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New Grand Jury on Another New York Police Shooting

New Grand Jury on Another New York Police Shooting

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A New York City grand jury will be empaneled to determine whether a rookie cop who shot and killed an unarmed man in a Brooklyn stairwell will face criminal charges.The grand jury was announced Friday by Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson as anger still simmers over a Staten Island grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner. Garner, who died this summer, was black. The officer was white.The Brooklyn shooting involves the death of Akai Gurley, 28, a black who was killed last month. The officer who shot him is Asian-American.

The timetable for the grand jury to convene was not immediately clear.“I pledge to conduct a full and fair investigation and to give the grand jury all of the information necessary to do its job,” Thompson said in a statement. “That information is still being gathered.”The NYPD has said it appears Gurley died from an accidental discharge of Probationary Officer Peter Liang’s gun. Liang and a partner were on so-called vertical patrol in an East New York housing project’s darkened stairwell at the time.A statement from Congressman Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., who represents the section of Brooklyn where the shooting took place, called the decision to take the case to a grand jury “a meaningful step.”“Akai Gurley did not deserve to die, and the evidence of a kill shot that penetrated his chest and struck him in the heart suggests something more than a non-criminal accident,” Jeffries said.The relations between blacks and the police have also been roiled in recent months by the police shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, and Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old who was playing with a toy gun when he was shot and killed by a Cleveland police officer.

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“Rolling Stone” Backtracks on Explosive UVA Rape Story, Issues Apology

“Rolling Stone” Backtracks on Explosive UVA Rape Story, Issues Apology

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- A stunning report about how rape is handled at UVA that sparked national outcry and prompted the university to suspend all fraternal group activity for the year is now being called into question.

Rolling Stone magazine on Friday began distancing themselves from the shocking story published last month about a student the publication identified as "Jackie," who said that she was the victim of a gang rape by seven men at a fraternity party.

"In the face of new information, there now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account, and we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced," the magazine's managing editor Will Dana wrote in a letter published on their site.

Dana said the author of the lengthy feature, Sabrina Rubin Erdely, did not talk to any of the students involved in the alleged rape before publishing the story out of respect for Jackie.

“We were trying to be sensitive to the unfair shame and humiliation many women feel after a sexual assault and now regret the decision to not contact the alleged assaulters to get their account," Dana wrote in the letter. "We are taking this seriously and apologize to anyone who was affected by the story."

In a series of tweets on Friday, Dana further noted that the fault lay with the magazine.

"We made a judgment – the kind of judgement reporters and editors make every day. And in this case, our judgement was wrong," Dana said in one tweet.

"We should have either not made this agreement with Jackie ... or worked harder to convince her that the truth would have been better served by getting the other side of the story," Dana continued. "That failure is on us -- not on her."

The fraternity where the rape allegedly occurred has released a statement Friday denying the article's allegations.

"We have no knowledge of these alleged acts being committed at our house or by our members," the statement from the Virginia branch of Phi Kappa Psi reads.

The fraternity where the rape allegedly occurred has released a statement pointing out three problems that its own investigation in conjunction with the Charlottesville Police Department has found in Jackie's story.

In the Rolling Stone article, Erdely used a pseudonym to describe the student that Jackie said invited her to a date function at the Phi Kappa Psi house in mid-September 2012 and later facilitated the gang rape. Jackie said that she met her date, "Drew," a junior, while working together as lifeguards at the university pool.

Psi Kappa Phi said in its statement that no member of their fraternity worked as a lifeguard in the fall semester of 2012. It also said that it did not have a date function or social event on the last weekend in September, though the article never specified exactly which weekend the alleged attack occurred.

The final point that they took issue with was the article's assertion that the alleged gang rape was part of a pledging task for prospective members. They said that their pledging activities do not occur in the fall semester.

"Moreover, no ritualized sexual assault is part of our pledging or initiation process," according to the statement. "This notion is vile, and we vehemently refute this claim."

In a tweet, Dana said: "I can't explain the discrepancies between Jackie's account and the counter statements made by Phi Psi."

"The fact that there is a story that appears in Rolling Stone in which I don't have complete confidence is deeply unsettling to me," Dana added in another tweet.

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Diamond Ring Lost in Salvation Army Kettle Returned to Owner

Diamond Ring Lost in Salvation Army Kettle Returned to Owner

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(MURRYSVILLE, Pa.) -- A Pennsylvania woman will not have to buy herself a new diamond ring this Christmas thanks to the sharp eyes of two Salvation Army workers who spotted the woman’s ring in a pile of money thrown in the organization’s famed red kettle.

Lisa Hawkins, of Murrysville, Pennsylvania, was walking into a Macy’s department store Tuesday evening when she scooped a batch of loose change from the bottom of her pocketbook and tossed it into the red kettle outside the store, telling the kettle worker, "Every little bit helps.”

When Hawkins was getting ready for work the next morning, she reached into her same pocketbook to pull out two rings she had been keeping in there to take to be sized and noticed one, a diamond-and-gold ring her husband gave her more than 20 years ago for their 10th wedding anniversary, was missing.

"I knew immediately where my ring was,” Hawkins told ABC News. “When I was scooping up the loose change I scooped up my ring too.”Hawkins, a neurology and neurosurgeon clinician at UPMC Mercy Hospital, did not tell her husband what happened but just began to call all The Salvation Army offices she could find.With no one answering, Hawkins said she turned to local TV stations for help, thinking her lost ring saga might be a “human interest story” they could help her solve.“A reporter from the local CBS affiliate responded around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, while I was at work,” Hawkins said.That reporter, KDKA’s John Shumway, began making calls himself and discovered that Hawkins’ ring had been found in the donation pile counted by Salvation Army Captains Christopher and Jennifer Blessing at the organization’s Braddock, Pennsylvania, chapter.“It definitely stood out,” Jennifer Blessing told ABC News of seeing Hawkins’ ring among piles of cash and change. “It was a beautiful diamond-and-gold ring, so it stuck out like a sore thumb.”Blessing said she and her husband were not sure if the ring was a donation or an accident, so they kept it safely aside.When they got the call from Shumway, the Blessings made the trip to Mercy Hospital themselves that same day, Wednesday, to deliver the ring back to Hawkins in person.“She was very grateful,” Blessing said of Hawkins.Hawkins, meanwhile, had to explain the lost ring story to her husband, an ER physician, and their daughter, a veterinary student, who both saw the story first on the local news.“My daughter said, ‘Mom, what you did was really stupid, but how you solved it was brilliant,’” Hawkins said.There were moments of panic for Hawkins, she said, when she thought she had lost the sentimental ring for good, but she thought of her greater blessings.“I kind of pulled myself in and said, ‘You have to look at what really matters in your life,’” Hawkins said. “It is a ring, and it’s a really expensive ring, but when I look at my life I have my mother, who is still alive. I have my husband, my daughter.”Instead of putting the ring away so she does not lose it again, Hawkins is doing quite the opposite, wearing it proudly for a good cause.“I’m keeping the ring on because as people come up to me and see it and ask about it, I tell them to go to a Salvation Army kettle and make a donation,” Hawkins said.She is also, with her family, making a second, larger donation to The Salvation Army this year.

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Washington Town Overrun with Crows Resorts to ‘Bird Bombs’

Washington Town Overrun with Crows Resorts to ‘Bird Bombs’

iStock/Thinkstock(SUNNYSIDE, Wash.) -- Police in Sunnyside, Washington, are stepping up their battle against a swarm of crows aggravating citizens and disrupting city services.

Commander Scott Bailey of the Sunnyside Police Department said his cops have recently begun using pyrotechnics as a way to scare off the crows that have multiplied dramatically in the last five years.

“Basically, it’s a firework inside a pistol shell,” he told ABC News, noting that the shells, sometimes called “bird bombs,” offer a non-lethal option for the police to combat the booming population.

“We’re simply trying to scare them off. We’re dealing with up to 10,000 crows every day,” he said.

The crows are causing numerous issues for townspeople, including health risks from feces, noise pollution, and even attacks during nesting season, Bailey said, adding that the birds pose a constant risk to the city’s electricity services because they sit in large numbers on power lines.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife notes on its website that crows are among the “most adaptable and intelligent birds.” They say harassment techniques are usually only effective for a short time.

But the pyrotechnics are part of a long-term strategy to move the crows into areas away from the city, Bailey said, noting his department is hoping to establish a “tree line” for birds to congregate away from the city within the next five years.

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Golden Retriever Rescued from Frozen Maine Lake

Golden Retriever Rescued from Frozen Maine Lake

iStock/Thinkstock(WATERBORO, Maine) -- A golden retriever in Maine had a cold and early start to his Wednesday morning after falling through the ice on a lake and getting stuck.

Fire officials in Waterboro, Maine, received a 911 call around 7:50 a.m., reporting a dog stuck nearly 100 feet offshore of Little Ossipee Lake, right in front of his owner’s house.

The dog, a five-year-old named Dakota, had been running outside after going for a morning walk with his owner, Linda Park.

"I couldn't believe it, I was worried about how in the world am I going to get him out of there," Park told local ABC affiliate WMTW of her reaction when her neighbor knocked on her door with the news.

Waterboro Fire Capt. Tom Langevin, a 20-year firefighter/EMS veteran, led the rescue. He strapped on an ice rescue suit and walked, attached to a rope, on the ice to bring Dakota to safety.

“He was able to go out on the ice and then broke through just when he got to the dog,” Waterboro Fire Chief Matt Bors told ABC News. “He helped the dog get up on the ice.”

Dakota arrived back onshore with no injuries, according to Bors.

“The dog got out, shook off and went home and spent about an hour in front of the wood stove heater,” he said. “And apparently consumed a bowl of ice cream after as a treat.”

According to Bors, the area of the lake where Dakota was found is a cove that had completely frozen over, while the rest of the lake had not.

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Little Boys Call 911 Because They Want to Talk to Santa

Little Boys Call 911 Because They Want to Talk to Santa

iStock/Thinkstock(MAYVILLE, Wis.) -- Two little boys who have a long wish list for Santa are going to see him in person, which is what a police officer advised the Becker brothers to do after they called 911 hoping to talk to Saint Nick.

The boys -- 6-year-old Blake and 3-year-old Brody -- of Mayville, Wisconsin, were sitting with their parents, Jennifer and Shawn Blake, on the couch in front of the TV. Blake had a tablet and Brody was playing with his father’s cellphone.

“They were just sitting there, just talking and stuff and all of a sudden Blake said, ‘Brody, let’s call Santa,’” Jennifer Becker told ABC News in a Thursday interview. “Well, Brody ended up hitting the emergency call button on the cellphone and it dialed 911.”

The Beckers didn’t know what their son had done until local emergency services called the cellphone to ask if everything was alright. Jennifer Becker, who told ABC that her sons have also dialed her co-workers accidentally, said she assured authorities there was nothing wrong.

Nevertheless, there was a knock at her door a short while later.

“The kids, they looked scared and I don’t know if it was because they thought it was, like, Santa Claus, but when we opened it, it was a police officer,” she said.

The Mayville Police officer who responded to the 911 hang-up on the afternoon of Nov. 23 explained to the Becker brothers that 911 was for emergencies only, Mayville Police Chief Christopher MacNeill told ABC News.

“The children were counseled as far as the proper use of 911 and they were told that the best way to contact Santa Claus was in person,” MacNeill said.

MacNeill said he had never heard of another such case in his more than 20 years in law enforcement.

“I kind of chuckled a little bit,” he said, describing his reaction to the call. “It’s good to know that there was no emergency but to hear that, you know, the two kids wanted to call Santa Claus, you know, was kind of humorous. But what we said is, basically, that the North Pole is out of our jurisdiction.”

Becker said she bears some of the blame for the accidental 911 call, adding that she and the boys had called an actual Santa Claus hotline -- (951) 262-3062 -- a few days earlier to leave a message about what they wanted for Christmas.

Callers to the hotline are greeted by a recording of a booming male voice purporting to be Santa. Callers are invited to leave a message with their Christmas wishes and cheer and "Santa" further ads that he knows who has been naughty or nice.

On their call to the hotline, “Brody was asking for trucks and big cars, and Blake, he wants a bow and arrow, truck, a four-wheeler combine,” Becker said, adding that she was surprised to hear her son spell out his Christmas wish list.

Blake and Brody got a tour of the Mayville Police Department Wednesday, where they received a helmet and toy police car.

The brothers will get to make their Christmas gift requests directly to Santa Friday when he visits Blake’s school, Becker said.

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Teen’s ‘Cute’ Mug Shot Wins Her Legions of Internet Fans

Teen’s ‘Cute’ Mug Shot Wins Her Legions of Internet Fans

Wake City-County Bureau of Identification(RALEIGH, N.C.) — Talk about mugging for the camera.A North Carolina teen has had her mugshot go viral after she posted it on Twitter following her arrest on drug charges.Alysa Suguro Bathrick, 18, was arrested on charges of possession with an intent to manufacture, sell or deliver Schedule IV controlled substances on Nov. 19. She tweeted about her arrest -- along with a picture of her mugshot -- on Dec. 1."Surrendered myself at 7 a.m., got released at 11:30 a.m. ... And my mugshot's cute," she wrote.The tweet has since been shared more than 1,000 times and the teen now has more than 7,400 Twitter followers and a long list of Internet admirers.Among her legion of fans, one twitter user, @AndyOrte, asked Bathrick what drugs she was charged with attempting to sell, with which she responded, “@AndyOrte xanax homie.”Bathrick has not returned request for comment.Bathrick isn’t the only mugshot that’s gone viral in 2014. In June, the mugshot of baby blue-eyed Jeremy Meeks, a California man, gave Kim Kardashian a run for her money to break the Internet when the Stockton Police Department posted his photo on its Facebook page.

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200 Arrests as Protesters Take to the Streets for a Second Night to Protest Grand Jury Rulings

200 Arrests as Protesters Take to the Streets for a Second Night to Protest Grand Jury Rulings

Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — For the second straight night, hundreds of protesters took to the streets of New York City to protest grand jury decisions in New York and Ferguson, Missouri, to not indict white police officers in the deaths of two unarmed black men.

New York City Police arrested more than 200 people in the overnight protests. Many of the arrests involved charges for disorderly conduct or refusal to clear the streets, authorities told ABC News.

Protesters partially closed down the Brooklyn Bridge while another group of demonstrators marched up Manhattan’s West Side Highway. Earlier this week, a grand jury on Staten Island opted not to indict New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo in the July death of Eric Garner, who was put in an apparent choke hold by the cop while selling loose cigarettes on the street. The 43-year-old Garner, who was overweight and asthmatic, died from a heart attack.Last month, a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri, declined to indict white police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown last August.New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke again Thursday about the protests, saying, “People need to know that black lives and brown lives matter as much as white lives.”In Boston, hundreds of protesters gathered at the Boston Common annual tree lighting Thursday to protest the New York grand jury decision.  The protesters remained behind barricades during the show and did not disrupt the program. The protesters later marched up several Boston streets.Hundreds of demonstrators also took to the streets of Chicago to protest. The city’s Lake Shore Drive was shut down temporarily by demonstrators clogging the roadway.There were protests in several other cities, including Atlanta, Minneapolis, Denver and Detroit. All the protests were peaceful, for the most part.Meanwhile, the New York City Police Department has launched an internal investigation into the choke hold death of Garner.Officer Pantaleo may now be interviewed by internal affairs officers. Police sources told ABC News the other officers who were on the scene are scheduled to be interviewed Friday.  If internal affairs investigators recommend a punishment, a department judge will be the one to decide if it is enacted.Pantaleo is also the subject of a federal civil rights investigation.On Thursday, a judge released some details of the Staten Island grand jury’s proceedings.  The grand jury sat for nine weeks and heard testimony from 50 witnesses, including 22 civilians.  The grand jury also reviewed 60 exhibits, including videos, records and photos. The grand jurors were also instructed on the law about the use of force. That law says, in part, a police officer can use force when it's necessary to make an arrest.

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Live Updates: NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Orbits Earth

Live Updates: NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Orbits Earth

NASA/Bill Ingalls(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — NASA's Orion spacecraft lifted off Friday morning from Cape Canaveral to the delight of NASA engineers, who had been forced to scrub the launch on Thursday after a trio of problems.

The spacecraft, which could one day ferry astronauts to Mars, is scheduled to orbit the Earth twice at an altitude of 3,600 miles before splashing down 600 miles off the coast of California around 11:30 am ET.Orion will make re-entry at 20,000 mph with temperatures hitting 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit -- twice as hot as molten lava.If this test succeeds, the next step will be another launch to circle the Moon in 2018, then a manned mission to the Moon in 2020.Orion seats four astronauts -- one more than Apollo. While the design may be the similar, Orion is equipped with technology that is light-years ahead of its Moon-shot mission predecessor.The spacecraft's computer can process 480 million instructions per second. It's also 25 times faster than the computers at the International Space Station, according to NASA.

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A scheduled launch Thursday was postponed due to several problems, including wind gusts, a stray boat in the launch zone and technical issues.ABC News is following the Orion's activity from its lift off to splash down four and a half hours later in the Pacific Ocean.Stay with the ABC News live blog for the latest on the unmanned Orion mission.

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How Police Across the US Have Used Body Cameras

How Police Across the US Have Used Body Cameras

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The New York City Police Department may be the largest American police force to begin testing body cameras for officers but it is far from the first.

One of the two types of cameras that are now being tested in New York City is developed by AXON, a company that has supplied the technology to more than 1,200 law enforcement agencies across the country.

AXON's parent company, TASER, is the leading body camera manufacturer and promotes the use of the technology as a way to improve the conduct of both police officers and the public.

Some New Yorkers, including the mother of Eric Garner, the man who died in July after a police officer put him in an apparent choke hold, fear that the cameras will do little to deter cops behaving badly, but other cities have had a warmer reception to the new technology.

Here is a rundown of how some police departments across the country are faring with body cameras:The biggest success story that is often cited by supporters of the cameras is Rialto, California. The suburban Los Angeles police department participated in a year-long study in 2012 of the cameras' effectiveness, with half of the officers recording their interactions with civilians. TASER reported that the number of use-of-force incidents dropped by 59 percent during that time period.Police in Daytona Beach, Florida, got a lot of backlash from the community immediately after an officer shot and killed former NFL player Jermaine Green six times in November 2013. However, the department later released the body camera video, and it showed how Green was trying to stab his girlfriend, whom he was holding hostage, just before police opened fire.One intense standoff between Sanford, Florida, police and a woman during a February 2013 traffic stop shows the step-by-step process as the woman pretends to cooperate before driving off and fleeing on foot.

In Celina, Texas, dashcam video captured an officer as he appears to jump a drug suspect, and throw the suspect violently to the ground. But the body camera video from the officer shows that when the suspect was hidden from the view of the dashcam, he punched the cop and tried to escape, leading to the take-down.Footage from a body camera in Lake Havasu, Arizona, helped in a June 2013 standoff. The video, released by AXON, shows simultaneous views of two flex cameras that shows the end of the negotiations with the suicidal man that concludes in the man's pool.One of the cameras deployed by a Greensboro, North Carolina, police officer shows how a juvenile suspect goes from holding a knife up to her throat to throwing the weapon at the officer. The footage from the June 2013 incident shows how detailed the recordings can be.One of the benefits that supporters tout about the body cameras is the fact that it frees officers from relying on dashcam footage. One incident recorded in Mesa, Arizona, in October 2012 shows how the recording of a traffic stop starts inside the police car but ends up on the sidewalk when the officers arrest the suspect.

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Package Theft Spree Tracked Through Rented Trailer, Cops Say

Package Theft Spree Tracked Through Rented Trailer, Cops Say

iStock/Thinkstock(SAN DIEGO) -- A woman who allegedly drove a U-Haul truck around a San Diego neighborhood stealing mailed packages from peoples' doorsteps was arrested after surveillance cameras identified the rented truck, police said Thursday.Martha Lampley, 37, began cruising the East County neighborhoods starting on Nov. 21, swiping packages until she was arrested on Nov. 29, the San Diego County Sheriff’s department told ABC News.

Lampley was tracked down when one of her alleged victims gave police a home surveillance video of a theft and footage included a U-Haul trailer in the background. Police were able to identify the rented vehicle and trace it back to Lampley, police said.“One of the deputies did a great job using the video to identify the suspect,” said Lt. Chris May. “She was using a rented U-haul truck to drive through the neighborhoods to commit the thefts.” 

The truck ID led officers to Lampley's storage unit where some of the stolen packages were found, authorities said.“Yesterday we returned packages to several of the victims. Many of the packages were still unopened with the delivery and packaging labels with the victim’s information,” said May.The spokesman said similar thefts involving a U-Haul trailer were reported elsewhere in Southern California.“There are a lot of offenders released in the community that will re-offend, we want to do our best to make it hard on them, to make it difficult for them,” said May. “With the Sheriff’s Holiday Watch program we’re trying to increase the public awareness on how to become less of a victim, less of an attractive victim to the criminals.”Lampley is booked at Las Colinas Jail on burglary charges and violating her parole. She was on parole for possessing drugs and drug paraphernalia, authorities said.Lampley has not yet appeared in court or entered a plea.

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NYPD Launches Internal Affairs Probe Into Eric Garner Chokehold Officer

NYPD Launches Internal Affairs Probe Into Eric Garner Chokehold Officer

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The New York City Police Department has launched an internal investigation into the choke hold death of Eric Garner at the hands of a police officer, one day after a grand jury announced that they would not be indicting the officer on criminal charges.

The officer involved in the controversial incident, Daniel Pantaleo, may now be interviewed by internal affairs officers, but the other officers who were on the scene may come first as they are scheduled to be interviewed on Friday, police sources told ABC News Thursday.

If the internal affairs investigators recommend a punishment, a department judge will be the one to decide if it is enacted.

The NYPD investigation is the second process that Pantaleo is going through, and he is also the subject of a federal civil rights investigation and can expect a civil wrongful death lawsuit from Garner's relatives.

"This is not the end of the story -- only the end of a chapter," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement released Thursday morning.

A Staten Island judge approved the release of some information pertaining to the secret grand jury who decided not to indict Pantaleo with any criminal charges relating to the death of Eric Garner, a 43-year-old man who was allegedly selling loose cigarettes at the time of the July 17 incident.

The jury met over nine weeks, hearing from 50 witnesses that included 22 civilians and the rest were police officers or emergency medical responders.

The jurors saw 60 other exhibits, including videos, photos and records.

Both Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Loretta Lynch, who is also President Obama's nominee to succeed Holder, spoke out on Wednesday, confirmed that they had informed Garner's widow of the federal civil rights investigation."Our prosecutors will conduct an independent, thorough, fair and expeditious investigation," Holder said Wednesday.NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton confirmed that the department trial and investigation into Pantaleo's actions will begin soon.Former Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, who is now a contributor to ABC News, said the burden of proof is far lower in an internal investigation where a "preponderance of evidence" must be supplied to support a finding against an officer, whereas grand jury decisions are based on probable cause.Though he estimated that an internal decision could be handed down in about six months, Kelly said it was "very difficult to say because normally they have a calendar for these things but because of the public scrutiny, they're going to move it up."The department trial will definitely not begin this week, however, because both sides -- Garner's family's attorneys and Pantaleo's attorneys -- have been focusing on the grand jury investigation up until now, Kelly said."They need time to prepare their case," Kelly said.

The final avenue of potential punishment, which may end up taking the longest, is the civil trial that would come when the Garner family files a wrongful death lawsuit. Garner's relatives and their attorney have already taken the first step in the process -- which in New York City involves notifying the NYPD that they intend to sue, in this case for $75 million.For the time being, 29-year-old Pantaleo has been suspended with pay and had both his gun and badge taken away pending the internal investigation. He has maintained his innocence and put out a statement after the grand jury decision was announced Wednesday."I became a police officer to help people and to protect those who can’t protect themselves," Pantaleo said. "It is never my intention to harm anyone and I feel very bad about the death of Mr. Garner. My family and I include him and his family in our prayers and I hope that they will accept my personal condolences for their loss."Pantaleo's suspension, and the apology he offered in a statement Wednesday after the grand jury decision was announced, was not enough for Garner's widow. When asked if she would accept his apology, Esaw Garner said: "Hell no!""He's still working, he's still getting a paycheck, he's still feeding his kids, and my husband is six feet under," she said.

Protests continued Thursday night as demonstrators took to the streets of New York, Dallas, and Chicago.

In New York, about 400 protesters marched into Times Square where they were met by a group of police officers. At least 20 arrests were reported in the city.

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