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Boat Owner Describes Moment He Found Alleged Boston Bomber

Boat Owner Describes Moment He Found Alleged Boston Bomber

Massachusetts State Police(BOSTON) -- The Massachusetts man who found alleged Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev recounted for a court Tuesday the moment he realized the suspect was hiding in a boat in his backyardDavid Henneberry testified that he "kept fixating" on a pool of blood that he discovered on the deck of his boat, the "Slipaway II," that was in his backyard.The retiree testified that he checked on the boat after two chafing guards and the shrink wrap had fallen off the boat."Not a huge amount," he said of the blood he saw on the boat deck. "But enough."When he climbed a ladder, he "saw a body in the boat," Henneberry told the court, also describing Tsarnaev's shoes, pants and hooded sweatshirt.There was "no movement at all" from the figure "lying on his side," he testified.Tsarnaev had been on the run since a shootout hours earlier with police that left his brother dead and an officer injured, according to prosecutors.The prosecution showed pictures of the message that they said Tsarnaev scrawled on to the side of the boat, and also introduced into evidence the bloodied pencil that authorities said Tsarnaev used.The message "Stop killing our innocent people ... we will stop," was carved into a wooden slat on the side of the boat. Tsarnaev also scrawled a long message in pencil branded with the name of Henneberry's stepson's company, according to the prosecution.Tsarnaev faces the death penalty for his role in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings that killed three people. A Cambridge, Massachusetts police officer was killed days later, allegedly by Tsarnaev and his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev.During Monday's court proceedings, a number of police officers described the gunfight between cops and the Tsarnaev brothers and the ensuing struggle with Tamerlan Tsarnaev. They also testified that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sped toward the struggle in an SUV, ultimately running over his older brother.Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to the 30 counts against him, including charges of using a "weapon of mass destruction resulting in death," but his defense attorney has declared that he participated in the bombing.

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A Brief History of St. Patrick’s Day

A Brief History of St. Patrick’s Day

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- St. Patrick’s Day, the day some pretend to be Irish and down a few pints, is one of the most beloved holidays on the calendar.But more than 1,500 years after St. Patrick’s death, the truth about how the March 17 holiday got its start remains a surprising tale for most revelers.To clear up the mythology surrounding this adored holiday, ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos has a brief history of St. Patrick’s Day:

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United Airlines Flight Returns to DC Airport After Passenger Runs Toward Cockpit

United Airlines Flight Returns to DC Airport After Passenger Runs Toward Cockpit

Reddit/iLL_D(WASHINGTON) — A United Airlines flight was forced to return to Washington, D.C., after a passenger failed to comply with crew instructions, a spokesman for the airline said Tuesday.Flight 1074, en route to Denver, returned to Dulles International Airport shortly after takeoff late Monday. The pilots told air traffic controllers the passenger became violent, but was restrained by passengers, according to LiveATC.net."He ran forward towards the cockpit and he is being restrained by passengers," one of the pilots said. "Cockpit is secure and we would like to return to the airport and have the authorities meet him."Donna Tellam, a passenger on board the flight, said two men grabbed him and held him down."One held his feet and the other one kind of laid on top of him and then the flight attendants went and got some plastic restraints for his arms," she said. “At one point when his head was down, he said there were jihadists in the cargo hold, and he did say jihad a couple times."Law enforcement in Washington met the plane at the gate and detained the passenger, according to a statement from United Airlines. He was taken to a hospital for an evaluation, an airport spokesman said.United Airlines planned to fly the remaining passengers to Denver Tuesday morning.

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Superman Fan Who Saved Two Lives Gets Hero’s Goodbye at Superhero-Themed Memorial

Superman Fan Who Saved Two Lives Gets Hero’s Goodbye at Superhero-Themed Memorial

Jackie Kmetz(BOTHELL, Wash.) -- Superman fan and "Superdad" Chris Kmetz was given a hero's farewell at his superhero-themed memorial Sunday at the Northshore Senior Center in Bothell, Washington. Dozens of friends and family came dressed in costumes of their favorite comic book characters, Chris' wife, Jackie Kmetz, told ABC News on Monday. Jackie dressed up as Wonder Woman while her kids dressed up as a little Superboy and Supergirl. Even villains like Poison Ivy from Batman and characters from other fandoms like Star Wars came out to celebrate, Jackie said. "We wanted to have a fun, kid-friendly celebration for my two little ones to remember their dad," Jackie said of her two children, ages 2 and 4. "I was so thrilled. It was the exact kind of party he would have loved." Chris, 41, died last month after a car accident, leaving behind two kids but saving two lives through organs he donated just hours after his death, his wife said. "In true superhero fashion, Chris passed away, but he saved two lives after donating his kidneys," Jackie told ABC News last month. Jackie tried to include everything Chris loved in the celebration of his life, she said. The auditorium was decorated with Superman-colored balloons. There was even a popcorn machine, a cotton candy machine and a video game corner with car racing games. "The place was a good representation of what my husband was all about," Jackie said. "It was so much fun and there were lots of smiles and laughter just as Chris would've wanted." A few tears were shed, however, during a slideshow presentation remembering Chris' life, Jackie said. "There were all these pictures of him being goofy, and you could just see how he was our family's hero," Jackie said. "After the slideshow, we had an open mic where lots of family and friends shared good memories of Chris." Guests also recorded a message to Jackie's kids in a "video interview corner" Jackie set up, she said. "I'm not sure how much they understand now given their young age, but when they're older, they can watch these videos and learn more about their amazing dad from everyone he touched," Jackie said.

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Conn. Investigators Moving Forward in Bizarre Bomb Plot, Bank Heist Probe

Conn. Investigators Moving Forward in Bizarre Bomb Plot, Bank Heist Probe

ABC News(NEW BRITAIN, Conn.) -- Law enforcement authorities probing the baffling case of a foiled kidnapping and robbery plot involving a Connecticut bank executive who showed up for work on a Monday morning in February with a bomb strapped to his chest gave the first public indication of progress in the vexing case over the weekend. “I’m confident we’ll solve this case,” New Britain Police Chief James Wardwell told ABC News from his windowed office overlooking downtown. Wardwell agreed to speak to details of the case revealed in court records. Police reports say the incident began late at night on Feb. 23, when two assailants allegedly broke into the ranch house in Bristol, Conn., Matthew Yussman, 35, shares with his mother, and ended after a dramatic Monday-morning bomb scare in neighboring New Britain, where Yussman works at Achieve Financial Credit Union, according to a 911 call from a bank employee. Shortly after 8 a.m., Yussman, the credit union’s chief financial officer, called an unidentified employee to say he was the victim of a home invasion and was on his way to work with a bomb strapped to his body. His mother was tied up at their home beside a bomb, too, the co-worker relayed to police in a three-minute 911 call. In the call to 911 dispatchers, the bank employee said: "I just received a call a few minutes ago from one of our VPs, who states that he's a victim of a home invasion overnight,” adding that both Yussman and his mother were “strapped to a bomb” – she at home and he in his car en route to the Achieve Financial Credit Union. The caller advised police that Yussman warned him not to call authorities because one of the people who invaded his house was coming with him to the bank. Yussman sounded as if he was “reading from a script,” the caller said. "And he's instructing me to vacate our branch in New Britain because one of the perpetrators is going to accompany him to clear out cash. And I have no reason not to believe that…" The first New Britain cop arrived at the bank just as Yussman rolled into the credit union parking lot. Spotting the device strapped to the man, the police sergeant evacuated the area as a SWAT team headed in. Using a decommissioned military MRAP, New Britain police removed the device, which proved to be a fake, Wardwell said, and no money was taken from the credit union. Yussman's mom told police she was duct-taped to her bed around 3:30 a.m. by two men whom she described to police as “polite” and “well spoken,” bringing lunch meat and juice to her in the predawn darkness. She says she later managed to free herself before police arrived but it appeared she had been tied up, officials said. Last week’s new wrinkle in the case - that Yussman had allegedly failed a police polygraph test the day of the incident – drew curious residents even deeper into a widening small-town mystery that, to many in these artsy former factory towns south of Hartford, seems to have sprung straight from the set of a Coen brothers film. Over the weekend, local police officials clarified that Yussman has continued to cooperate with investigators from his hometown Bristol police department. Wardwell’s boss, 27-year-old New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart, also signaled confidence that her police force and state and federal investigators will crack the case. She, too, declined to respond to direct questions about the case, but instead described a wealth of resources devoted to the investigation. “They have access to technology and resources that other departments would kill for,” she said late last week. “Our people are quick. They close cases. These are professionals - not amateurs.” Stewart, a descendant of several generations of Italian immigrants drawn to New Britain’s mid-20th century industrial boom, acknowledged that the case is the talk of the town. She said she’s heard a spectrum of opinions from curious constituents, ranging from the media weary – “Oh brother, here we go again" – to the wild-eyed: “Holy s***! What is this? Out of a movie or something?” In diners, bars, coffee shops and fried chicken shacks, dozens of locals in nearby Bristol declined to talk about the case for attribution. But the communities seem to be hanging on every new development. “This has been a huge talker,’’ said Bristol Press police reporter Justin Muszynski. “People approach me on a daily basis asking me what the latest news is, asking, “Can you tell me anything that hasn’t been printed in the newspaper?”…They’re coming right up to me on the street to ask me the latest,” he said. “Daily.” Tricia Connelly, a former schoolteacher-turned-school bus driver who dropped into Bristol’s Crystal diner over the weekend for coffee, laughed when told that no one in the area would talk about the case on the record. “People around here are discreet,” she said, turning a couple heads in the sleepy diner. “But it doesn’t mean they’re not talking about it.” The question on everyone’s minds is this: was the home invasion an inside job? Was it an elaborate attempt to rob the bank? Local authorities say they’ll get to the bottom of it. Chief Wardwell said he was in the room and witnessed the failed polygraph test. “We administered the polygraph and he failed it,” said Wardwell, who is vice president of the American Association of Polygraphists. “So we said, “Look, we have a problem here. Look at this result. That’s when it ended.” “[T]he results of that test indicated that Yussman showed deception on the relevant test question, ‘Are you lying about your involvement in the home invasion,” according to a search warrant application unsealed Wednesday. However, polygraph tests are not scientifically reliable and thus are not admissible in court, the Connecticut Supreme Court has ruled. Even someone’s willingness or unwillingness to take such a test can’t be used in court. Since the events of that morning, little has surfaced publicly about Yussman, except for a Facebook profile picture that shows the ruddy-cheeked bank executive in a green T-shirt that appears to read, “Out of Tequila: Life is Cruel.” He plays night hockey at a local rink, follows the Boston Bruins, the Denver Broncos and the Kentucky Wildcats, and favors classic hard rock acts including Def Lepperd, Van Halen and AC/DC, according to his online profile. Attempts to reach Yussman by phone and at his home to discuss the case were unsuccessful. He doesn’t appear to have a lawyer. Investigators unconnected to the case told ABC News they have many questions about what happened. “[It] just didn’t feel or look right to me,” said former FBI agent Brad Garrett, who has investigated similar home invasion bank robbery attempts. “First of all, it’s too complicated. I’ve worked cases…where people have gone into branch managers’ homes and tied up their wives or girlfriends or whatever, but the whole thing with the mother and the bomb? And at some point he is able to walk into her bedroom, talk to her, walk out?" “All those things, all the details, could turn out to be okay,” Garrett said. Generally, he said, in such cases the perpetrators would never let the subject out “out of their sight, and they don’t allow him any communication with anyone." Garrett said investigators are likely studying CCTV camera footage, reviewing license plate reader records, pouring through Yussman’s email, bank office phone records, credit history - seeking any shred of a connection between the bank executive and the apparently still-unidentified assailants. A key lead may be stored in a local cell tower. “We know they communicated with him by cell phone,” said Garrett, an ABC News consultant. “Did they use throwaway phones, cause then that could only help a little bit. Police will be looking for any link to the perpetrators at Yussman’s house such as fingerprints or DNA. “You’re also combing social media, looking for anything of value,” Garrett said. “Typically these guys - assuming this is legitimate, they’re probably going to have a robbery record." “You don’t do this kind of robbery as your first,” Garrett added.

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Robert Durst: Real Estate Heir Charged With Murder in LA

Robert Durst: Real Estate Heir Charged With Murder in LA

HBO(LOS ANGELES) -- Real estate heir Robert Durst was charged with one count of first-degree murder with the special circumstances of murder of a witness, as well as lying in wait and gun use allegations, the Los Angeles County D.A. said late on Monday. The charge is in connection with the 2000 murder of his friend, Susan Berman, in Los Angeles. "Prosecutors have been working closely with the Los Angeles Police Department for the past two years investigating the cold case murder. Durst is charged with murdering Berman on or about Dec. 23, 2000. Her body was discovered in her Benedict Canyon home on Christmas Eve," the D.A. said in a statement. Durst was arrested at a Marriott hotel in New Orleans over the weekend. Louisiana State Trooper Melissa Matey confirmed to ABC News Monday night that an arrest warrant was issued for Durst and he was rebooked in the Orleans Parish Jail under two new charges: convicted felon in possession of a firearm, and possession of a weapon with a controlled dangerous substance, which was a small amount of marijuana.The 71-year-old appeared before a judge Monday in New Orleans for the extradition hearing, where his lawyers agreed to have him sent back to California. On whether Durst faces possible charges in Louisiana, Christopher Bowman, a spokesman for Orleans Parish D.A. Leon Cannizzaro, Jr., said, "Pursuant to office policy, the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s Office does not comment on criminal investigations or even the existence of criminal investigations." Durst, who was chained and shackled at waist and feet, wore an orange jumpsuit and smiled for a bit as he looked around the courtroom. He had been kept in a glass holding booth before appearing before a judge. "Let me just say that we came here to waive jurisdiction and to go back to California and to get it on," Durst's lawyer Dick DeGuerin said in front of the courthouse after the hearing was over. "Bob Durst didn't kill Susan Berman -- he’s ready to end all the rumor and speculation and have a trial but we’re frustrated because the local authorities are considering filing charges on him here and holding him here," DeGuerin said. Durst, the son of a wealthy New York real estate family, was the subject of an HBO series detailing the disappearance of his wife Kathleen, the murder of his friend Susan Berman, and the death of his neighbor Morris Black. Durst was acquitted in 2003 of Black's murder, but was never charged in connection to Kathleen's disappearance or Berman's death. Berman was scheduled to meet with investigators looking into Kathleen's 1982 disappearance when Berman was found shot in the back of the head in her Los Angeles home, investigators said. Durst was arrested just before the finale of the HBO series, in which he was heard on a recording saying that he "killed them all."

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Grad Students Restore Damaged Photos For Couple Who Lost Sons in Fatal Fire

Grad Students Restore Damaged Photos For Couple Who Lost Sons in Fatal Fire

University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation(WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE, Ohio) -- Damaged photographs rescued from a fire that killed three young brothers and their grandmother in Washington Court House, Ohio, recently received the kind of treatment usually given to historical artifacts in museums. Over 260 photos that suffered fire and water damage in the tragic accident were restored by graduate students in a photo conservation class at the University of Delaware. The photos were delivered back to Ricky Harris and Traci Harris, the parents of the three brothers lost in the fire, last Friday. "It was bittersweet experience," family friend and UDel doctoral student Michael Emmons told ABC News on Monday. "The photos won't bring back Ricky and Traci's children and Ricky's mom, but it's powerful that they're able to save these memories." Emmons discovered the damaged photos laid out in Ricky's garage while on his way to pay his condolences last December, he said. The hundreds of photos were charred, covered in soot and stained by the water used to fight the blaze that took the lives of 60-year-old Terry Harris and her grandsons Kenyon, 14, Broderick, 11, and Braylon, 9. Emmons then contacted Debra Hess Norris, chairman of UDel's art conservation department and photo conservation professor, asking if she knew of any way to help restore the photos for the Harris family. Coincidentally, Norris was prepping for a photo conservation class, Emmons said, and she switched out her original class project plans to help the Harris family, using their photos for the class project instead. The students worked late nights and weekends to restore every photograph one by one, Norris told ABC News Monday. "It was a labor of love on the part of everyone," Norris said. "The project was such a great example of why preservation of cultural heritage is so important. Just seeing the memories they contain, it was a very moving and real affirmation as to why we're involved in this field." The photographs included both black-and-white and color portraits, Polaroids, and photo booth prints and snapshots, Norris said. Every image was treated differently according to its particular damage, she added. "At times, many of us were in tears," Norris said. "We felt a strong personal connection to the images." Norris flew to Ohio with Emmons to personally deliver the photos at a community gathering held at a local youth recreational center, she said. Ricky and Traci said they were very grateful for the photos and the work students did to restore them, but it's difficult to see the people they can no longer hug in person. "When I look in their eyes in those pictures, you see them like physically, like I am looking at you guys, I can grab you guys, but I can't grab them," Ricky told ABC News affiliate WSYX-TV. ABC News' attempts to contact Ricky and Traci for additional comment were unsuccessful. The cause of the blaze hasn't been determined yet, the state fire marshal's office said Friday, WSYX-TV reported, but Ricky said he thinks a propane gas leak started the fire. The fire destroyed the house and its contents, but the photographs were discovered in a tub, charred and wet, WSYX-TV reported.

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Larry Dixon’s Car Snaps in Half at Nearly 300 MPH in Scary Racing Moment

Larry Dixon’s Car Snaps in Half at Nearly 300 MPH in Scary Racing Moment

File photo. iStock/Thinkstock(GAINESVILLE, Fla.) -- Investigators are trying to figure out what caused a drag race car to snap in half, breaking into pieces at almost 300 miles per hour -- a scary moment for the racing community. The incident happened Saturday at the Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals drag racing event at the Auto-Plus Raceway in Gainesville, Florida. A dragster driven by Larry Dixon broke in half, flipping and smashing into a retaining wall. Dixon, who was launched more than 20 feet in the air, was able to walk away unhurt, waving to the crowd. “I got maybe 100 feet before the finish line and then that’s when the front end failed and it flew off the car,” Dixon said following the race. “At that point, I’m along for the ride. I’m traveling through the air and hoping that I stay on the racetrack when I finally come down.” The three-time NHRA Top Fuel champion survived a nearly identical accident on a Memphis track in 2000. Dixon suffered a broken leg and an eye injury in that accident. Dixon says safety improvements such as the Head and Neck Support (HANS) device have been vital for drivers. “I feel safer in that race car than I do driving to the racetrack, because of my head and neck restraint, because of my helmet, because of the roll cage that I’m surrounded in,” Dixon said. “So when you do have a bad day at the office, you can dust yourself off and get back in again.”

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Cops Offer Dramatic Testimony at Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Cops Offer Dramatic Testimony at Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

FBI(BOSTON) -- Police officers who engaged brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a gunfight delivered heart-pounding accounts of the encounter in testimony Monday at the Boston Marathon bombing trial. The shootout with police in Watertown, Massachusetts, ended with Tamerlan Tsarnaev's death and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's brief escape into a boat stored in someone's backyard. "For eight minutes," Watertown Police Officer Joseph Reynolds testified, "it felt like there were hundreds of rounds" being fired at him by Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Gunshots were only the beginning. Reynolds said he saw a lighter being lit and a wick burning. Moments later, two pipe bombs exploded nearby and then Reynolds said he saw "a larger type bomb ... like a big cooking pot ... coming through the air." The blast from it shook him and he dropped to his knees, Reynolds said, with his ears ringing and engulfed by a cloud of smoke and a shower of debris. Tamerlan Tsarnaev threw pipe bombs like a baseball, Sergeant John Maclellan testified, while Dzhokhar Tsarnaev tossed them like a hook shot over his head.  When a large device fashioned from a pressure cooker detonated, Maclellan told the jury, the blast disoriented him so badly he re-holstered his weapon in the middle of the shootout to pull himself together.  "My eyes were shaking violently in my head. I couldn't see straight," Maclellan said. "I was still being shot at and I was behind a plastic fence and I thought I was going to get killed. Tactically it was a pretty bad decision to re-holster during the gunfight but I couldn't see." During the shootout, "Tamerlan started running towards me," Reynolds recalled, noting that another officer tackled him from behind and two more joined to try and subdue him. "He was wrestling with us and we were trying to gain control of him so we could put handcuffs on him," Reynolds said. "He's a big kid. He was wrestling with us, we weren't able to control him." Tamerlan Tsarnaev then "had a problem with his pistol," Watertown police Sgt. Jeffrey Pugliese testified.  "He looked at the gun, looked at me," Pugliese said, and then "threw the gun at me." Tamerlan Tsarnaev tried to run, but Pugliese tackled him. Pugliese said he then heard an officer shout "Sarge, sarge look out!" and he said he saw Dzhokhar Tsarnaev speeding towards them in the SUV that the brothers had allegedly carjacked. "I saw that the vehicle was on the wrong side of the road heading directly at me and Tamerlan," Pugliese said. "I reached down and grabbed Tamerlan by the belt to try and drag him out of the street to avoid getting struck." The car didn't stop and everyone scattered, Reynolds said, adding: "Tamerlan was run over by the Mercedes." After Tamerlan Tsarnaev was struck, he was dragged 25 feet until his brother hit a police cruiser and sped off, dislodging him, Pugliese said. James Floyd, a Watertown resident, also testified, saying he saw "guns firing and people screaming."  Floyd said he saw someone hurl a "book bag" before a big explosion, blinding light and smoke.  He also said he saw the SUV speed towards the crowd of police officers. "It went very fast," Floyd said, noting that he heard "a thud" and then "lots and lots of gunfire." When Massachusetts State Police Major Frank Hughes took the stand, the jury relived how Boston and surrounding communities effectively shut down during the hunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Mass transit stopped, state troopers patrolled the airport and roadblocks went up.  Not long after the restrictions lifted, a man called 911 to report someone was in his dry-docked boat. Hughes pointed at Tsarnaev when asked if he saw the individual taken from the boat in court today. Under cross-examination, the defense showed a photo of Tsarnaev coming out of the boat with his bloodied hands up, palms out, in apparent surrender. Jurors were also brought to an offsite location near the courthouse to view the boat today. Tsarnaev sat under a white canopy under heavy guard as jurors viewed the boat, which still had bullet holes, blood streaks and faded writing from Tsarnaev's note, according to reporters who accompanied the jurors. Part of Tsarnaev's note had been written in pencil, while the bottom part was physically carved into wooden slats. The slats have since been removed and are expected to be brought into court as evidence. Dr. Heather Studley, who treated MBTA officer Dick Donohue after he was shot, testified today that Donohue was unresponsive and not breathing when he arrived at the hospital. Studley said she had to stanch his wound with her knee before he went into surgery. Donohue survived and spent over one month in intensive care. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to the 30 counts against him, including charges of using a "weapon of mass destruction resulting in death." Tsarnaev's attorney said at the beginning of the trial that Tsarnaev had participated in the bombing. The trial comes just under two years after twin explosions ripped through the crowd near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in April 2013, killing three people -- including an 8-year-old boy -- and injuring some 260 others. More than a dozen of those injured lost limbs, authorities have noted. Prosecutors say Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother were responsible for the death and destruction, and that the two were photographed dropping backpacks holding the bombs before the blasts. The city of Boston was paralyzed for days during an intense manhunt, during which the pair allegedly gunned down and killed an MIT police officer.

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The Warning Robert Durst’s Wife Told Friends Before Her Death

The Warning Robert Durst’s Wife Told Friends Before Her Death

HBO(LOS ANGELES) -- In the mystery surrounding the 1982 disappearance of Kathie Durst, the wife of real estate heir Robert Durst, her friends had no question who was involved.Four of Kathie's friends interviewed by ABC News in 2001 were all convinced that Robert Durst was connected to their friend's disappearance because she had told them as much.In the months and weeks leading up to her Jan. 31, 1982 disappearance, Kathie Durst told friends like Eleanor Schwank that "if anything ever happens to me, don't let Bobby get away with it."Robert Durst was never charged in connection to his wife's disappearance, and even though her body was never found, she was declared dead in 2001.Archival footage shows interviews with Kathie's friends including Gilberte Najamy, who was the last person to see Kathie before she left to meet Robert."The last conversation that I had with Kathie was a very powerful conversation and as she was leaving my house, she turned to me and said 'Gilberte, promise me if something happens to me you'll check it out. I'm afraid of what Bobby might do,'" Najamy told ABC News in 2001.Durst has now been charged with the 2000 murder of his friend Susan Berman who police believe was about to meet with investigators about Kathie's disappearance days after she was found dead.

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Robert Durst Arrest: Real Estate Heir Appears in Court, Agrees to Extradition

Robert Durst Arrest: Real Estate Heir Appears in Court, Agrees to Extradition

HBO(NEW ORLEANS) — Robert Durst appeared before a judge Monday in New Orleans for an extradition hearing after he was arrested for the unsolved murder of his friend in 2001.Durst, who was chained and shackled at waist and feet, wore an orange jumpsuit and smiled for a bit as he looked around the courtroom.It is unclear when Durst will be extradited to California on the murder charge.Durst, the son of a wealthy New York real estate family, was the subject of a HBO series detailing the disappearance of his wife Kathleen, the murder of his friend Susan Berman and the death of his neighbor Morris Black.Durst was acquitted in 2003 of Black's murder, but was never charged in connection to Kathleen's disappearance or Berman's death.Berman was scheduled to meet with investigators looking into Kathleen's 1982 disappearance when Berman was found shot in the back of the head in her Los Angeles home, investigators said.Durst was arrested in New Orleans on Sunday, just before the finale of the HBO series where he was heard on a recording saying that he "killed them all." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

California Man Allegedly Spray Paints Face Black to Escape Police

California Man Allegedly Spray Paints Face Black to Escape Police

Madera County Jail(MADERA, Calif.) -- A California man spray painted his face black "in an effort to camouflage himself" and evade police, a Madera Police Department spokesman told ABC News Monday.But the "camouflage was ineffective," the spokesman said.The suspect, Jose Espinoza, 23, was arrested on Saturday night facing charges of possession of stolen property and theft of a vehicle, the spokesman said.Espinoza fled the first time police arrived at his house, but he was successfully apprehended when he later returned to his home and was allegedly seen with black spray paint on his face, the spokesman said.The spray paint bottle Espinoza allegedly used has been turned over as evidence, he added.Espinoza was booked into Madera County Jail early Sunday, according to the jail's records.A court date during when Espinoza will be expected to answer to his charges is unknown, and it is unclear whether Espinoza has a lawyer.

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Robert Durst Says on HBO ‘What the Hell Did I Do? Killed Them All’

Robert Durst Says on HBO ‘What the Hell Did I Do? Killed Them All’

Courtesy of HBO (NEW ORLEANS) — Robert Durst, the subject of both an HBO series and law enforcement scrutiny, asked himself off-camera in the closing moments of the final episode of the documentary that aired Sunday, “What the hell did I do?” before answering, “Killed them all, of course.”The six-part HBO series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst ended a day after Durst was arrested on a capital murder warrant issued by police in Los Angeles related to the death of his friend, Susan Berman, his attorney said Sunday.Durst, 71, was arrested by FBI agents Saturday afternoon at a New Orleans hotel, a day before the final episode of the HBO series aired, a law enforcement source briefed on the investigation told ABC News.FBI agents believed Durst may have wanted to flee the country, possibly to Cuba, as he registered under an alias at the hotel, paid with cash, and was found with fake documents, said the source. According to nola.com, Saturday marked the first nonstop flight from New Orleans to Cuba since 1958.The Los Angeles Police Department said Sunday Berman's death has been under investigation since her body was found in her home on Christmas Eve in 2000."As a result of investigative leads and additional evidence that has come to light in the past year, investigators have identified Robert Durst as the person responsible for Ms. Berman's death," the LAPD said.Durst appeared before a magistrate Sunday in New Orleans where he was ordered held without bond, according to the Orleans Parish Sheriff's Office. He has an extradition hearing scheduled for Monday."We will waive extradition in an attempt to expedite the process of getting into court in LA to answer and defend against the charges," Chip Lewis, Robert Durst’s attorney, told ABC News in a statement.Durst's brother Douglas Durst said in a statement, "We are relieved and also grateful to everyone who assisted in the arrest of Robert Durst. We hope he will finally be held accountable for all he has done."HBO said in a statement, "We simply cannot say enough about the brilliant job that Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smerling did in producing The Jinx. Years in the making, their thorough research and dogged reporting reignited interest in Robert Durst's story with the public and law enforcement."The New York real estate heir has made national headlines as a person of interest or suspect in three deaths since 1982.Durst has denied killing Berman, but some believed he had a motive, allegedly wanting to silence her about the 1982 disappearance of his first wife, Kathleen Durst, another death he has been investigated for but never charged. Berman was about to meet with investigators in New York about the disappearance of Kathleen Durst before she died.Kathleen was officially declared dead in 2001, and Durst has said he has no idea what happened to her.Durst was also charged in the 2001 killing of a neighbor in Galveston, Texas, but he claimed self-defense and was later found not guilty.Durst, who participated in 25 hours of interviews for the HBO series, declined to comment to ABC News about the series. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

New Orleans Ranks #1 of US Quirkiest Cities

New Orleans Ranks #1 of US Quirkiest Cities

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Do you live in a quirky city?Whether it's a badge of honor or not, Travel and Leisure magazine has come out with its annual list of the nation's 20 quirkiest cities, based on a variety of factors, not the least of which are the types of people who occupy a U.S. metro area. Craft beers and thrift stores are a few of the other metrics used to determine weirdness.New Orleans, where it's like a perpetual party town 365 days a year, has the distinction of being the quirkiest city in the country, according to the magazine, with Austin, Texas, second and Portland, Oregon, coming in at third. Oh, the other Portland is on the list too.Here's the rest of the top 20:

4. Providence, Rhode Island5. Albuquerque, New Mexico6. San Francisco, California7. Baltimore, Maryland8. Kansas City, Missouri9. Seattle, Washington10. New York, New York11. Tampa, Florida12. Minneapolis, St. Paul, Minnesota13. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania14. Portland, Maine15. Houston, Texas16. Nashville, Tennessee17. Los Angeles, California18. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19. Louisville, Kentucky20. Atlanta, Georgia

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Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

 

Out of This World: How Life in Space Changed an Astronaut’s Outlook on Life on Earth

Out of This World: How Life in Space Changed an Astronaut’s Outlook on Life on Earth

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- When Astronaut Ron Garan returned from a six-month stint onboard the International Space Station, he had a new perspective on life on Earth.“You really get hit in the gut with this sobering contradiction between the beauty of our planet on one hand and the unfortunate realities of life on our beautiful planet for a significant portion of its inhabitants,” Garan said of looking down at the Earth from space.So profound was the experience that Garan has since dedicated his life to finding ways to make the planet a more cooperative place and has written a book, The Orbital Perspective, outlining his vision. For starters, Garan suggests that humankind look to the International Space Station as an example of what is possible through international collaboration.“Take that collaboration, that international communication that built arguably the most complex complicated structure ever built and bring it down to Earth,” he said. “Bring the collaboration that built and sustains the International Space Station and put it in the context of our rapidly developing, hyper-interconnected global society.”There are also some technologies originally developed to make life in space possible that Garan believes can be used on Earth in some cases to improve quality of life in the developing world.“We recycle all our water on the space station,” Garan said. “We turn yesterday's coffee into today's coffee. And so a lot of that technology…can transfer to developing communities around the world.”But there are other aspects of living in space that are in no way transferrable to Earth dwellers. Anti-gravity is one of them. When he first arrived at the space station, Garan said it was an adjustment learning to live in an environment without gravity.“If you set something down, it's not going to stay there, it's going to go floating off,” Garan said. “So, there's a propensity to lose things in space, because of weightlessness. But it gives you a freedom that you really don't have on the Earth. If I want to work on something on the floor, I don't have to bend over I can just flip upside down and turn the ceiling into the floor or the floor into the ceiling.”And over the course of his six months in space, Garan said he never tired of it.“I think that the environment there is absolutely wonderful,” he said. “One of the things that I think would surprise people is how wonderful it is to live in space; that freedom that you get from living in a three-dimensional world.”For more of the interview with Garan, including what one problem he most wants to fix here on Earth, check out this episode of “Power Players.”

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It’s Official! Boston’s Snowiest Winter on Record

It’s Official! Boston’s Snowiest Winter on Record

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — There’s excitement all over Boston as the city officially broke its all-time snowfall record of 107.6 inches set nearly 20 years ago.With a couple of inches recorded at Logan Airport Sunday, Boston reached 108.6 inches of the white stuff that has paralyzed the city at various points during the 2014-2015 winter season.A late winter thaw over the past week melted some of the piles of snow residents have had to maneuver through in February and March, but they shouldn’t let their guard down just yet.An arctic front is expected to come through the area, beginning Tuesday, bringing with it the possibility of more snow Friday, which, you guessed it, is the first day of spring.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

LAPD Officer Sought as Person of Interest in Homicide Investigation

LAPD Officer Sought as Person of Interest in Homicide Investigation

Pomona Police Department(POMONA, Calif.) -- A Los Angeles police officer has been identified as a person of interest in the slaying of a 23-year-old Ontario, California, man. Southern California authorities are looking to speak with Henry Solis, a probationary LAPD officer, in connection with the Friday killing of Salome Rodriguez Jr. in Pomona, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles, according to the Pomona Police Department. Solis, 27, was off duty at the time of the shooting and then failed to report to work, police said. According to Pomona police, Rodriguez and the suspect may have been in a physical altercation before the shooting. Rodriguez suffered gunshot wounds to the lower torso and was taken to USC Medical Center, where he died. Rodriguez's cousin Barbara Lopez said, "I've caught mom and dad breaking down, but they actually look a bit more at ease knowing that they have a person of interest," ABC's News station KABC-TV reported. Solis' whereabouts are unknown and police say they have reason to believe he knows authorities are looking for him. Anyone with information is asked to contact Pomona detectives at (909) 620-2085.

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Man Charged in Ferguson Shooting That Injured Two Police Officers

Man Charged in Ferguson Shooting That Injured Two Police Officers

St. Louis County Police Department(CLAYTON, Mo.) -- A 20-year-old man has been arrested in connection with a shooting outside the headquarters of the Ferguson police department that injured two officers, St. Louis County police and prosecutors said Sunday. Jeffery Williams was charged with two counts of first-degree assault, one count of firing a weapon from a vehicle, and three counts of armed criminal action, said St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch. McCulloch said a handgun recovered from Williams, 20, matched shell casings found from the scene of the shooting. It's unclear if he meant to shoot the police officers, said McCulloch, since Williams told investigators he was involved in some sort of dispute prior to the shooting. “He is charged with assaulting these two police officers. It's still regardless of who may be an intended target,” he said. “You hit somebody, that's still an assault in the first-degree. It's still a class-A felony, still punishable by life in prison. That's on each one of the counts pending against him.”

Williams was being held on $300,000 cash bond.The two officers were injured early Thursday during heated protests outside the the police department after the resignation of the city’s police chief, Tom Jackson, who stepped down in the wake of a Justice Department report that documented widespread racial bias in the city, biases that have gained national attention since the August police shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown. The investigation into the incident is ongoing.

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Robert Durst Arrested in New Orleans

Robert Durst Arrested in New Orleans

Courtesy of HBO(NEW ORLEANS) -- Robert Durst, the subject of the HBO series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, has been arrested on a murder warrant issued by police in Los Angeles related to the death of his friend, Susan Berman. Durst, 71, was arrested Saturday in New Orleans, a day before the final episode of the HBO series airs. His attorney, Chip Lewis, told ABC News on Sunday that the warrant was related to Berman's death. Durst was scheduled to appear in court in New Orleans, Lewis said. He told  ABC News station KTRK-TV in Houston that his client would not fight extradition back to California. The New York real estate scion has made national headlines as a person of interest or suspect in three deaths since 1982. The investigation into Berman's death was recently reopened by police in Los Angeles. Durst has denied killing Berman, but some believed he had a motive, allegedly wanting to silence her about the 1982 disappearance of his first wife, Kathleen Durst, another death he has been investigated for but never charged. Berman was about to meet with investigators in New York about the disappearance of Kathleen Durst before she died. Kathleen was officially declared dead in 2001, and Durst has said he has no idea what happened to her. Durst was also charged in the 2001 killing of a neighbor in Galveston, Texas, but he claimed self-defense and was later found not guilty. Durst, who participated in 25 hours of interviews for the HBO series, declined to comment to ABC News about the series.

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Video Shows Moment Freight Train Collided with Car in Fatal Kentucky Crash

Video Shows Moment Freight Train Collided with Car in Fatal Kentucky Crash

CHUYN/iStock/Thinkstock(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- At least two people died and two others were injured in Kentucky when their car entered a train crossing into the path of an oncoming freight train, police said. The crash – which was captured on video – happened at 4:07 p.m. Saturday in Louisville. Dwight Mitchell with the Louisville Metro Police said the intersection’s flashing lights and sounds were activated to alert drivers of the approaching train. There is no gate at the intersection. Four people were in the white Toyota Camry at the time of the crash. Two of the people inside the car were killed, while two others were taken to University Hospital in Louisville, Mitchell said. No one on the train was injured. The freight train did not derail, but it was unable to slow down and pushed the car about a half mile down the tracks, Mitchell said. The crash remains under investigation.

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