Home » Archives by category » Political News

Hillary Clinton Email: Local Democratic Leaders Stirred, Not Shaken

Hillary Clinton Email: Local Democratic Leaders Stirred, Not Shaken

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Democratic leaders in the key early caucus state of Iowa and elsewhere are offering mixed reactions to revelations surrounding Hillary Clinton’s use of private email as secretary of state, with most standing by her but some questioning whether their party needs another choice. "Those supportive of Hillary Clinton that were backing her in 2008 are pushing this aside," Linda Nelson, the Pottawattamie County, Iowa, Democratic chair, told ABC News. "Others are saying, 'Hey, Hillary is going to continue to have baggage from her husband's administration, from the State Department that’s going to be drawn out again and again, and we aren’t going to win the presidency. Let’s just get a fresh face and move forward.’” Walt Pregler, Democratic Party chair for Dubuque County, Iowa, called the email issue "trivial," and other local Democratic leaders seemed to feel the same way. “Everybody has a private email account. The fact that she has one doesn’t seem to make a big difference," Polk County Democratic Chair Tom Henderson told ABC News. "I don’t think voters know why it’s important yet." Martin Peterson from Crawford County, Iowa, expressed concerns over a lack of options. "Unfortunately there are no other candidates- I wish there were," Peterson said to ABC News. "It won’t be competitive enough and we’ll probably lose because I don’t think it will play out well for us. Now how about that for pessimism?" Clinton’s team has said it has handed over 55,000 pages of emails to the State Department for review, and while the question of whether or not she broke any rules by purposefully avoiding a government-run email account is still up in the air, the optics of the controversy are the bigger issue, for some. “She had the right to use it. But was it smart? Probably not,” Cedar County, Iowa, Democratic Party chair Larry Hodgden said. “It’s not illegal but this is just one more thing she’s opened herself up to controversy.” Outside Iowa, other Democrats see the email controversy just as part of the inevitable political process. Doug Grant, Democratic Party chair for the northern part of Grafton County, New Hampshire, called the email issue "a tempest in a teapot." "I will look for a blazing star [candidate] that will come out from nowhere in the next three months, that will blaze in the sky. That’s just not too plausible, unfortunately," he said. Pennsylvania Democratic Party Chairman Jim Burn told ABC News that he has "no pause" about Clinton, but a primary is necessary "if you have candidates who haven’t been battle-tested...but we’ve had that conversation with Hillary Clinton and we have pretty much vetted her." One of the most vocal Democratic voices speaking out against Clinton is Dick Harpootlian, one of Vice President Joe Biden's biggest supporters and a former Democratic Party chairman in South Carolina. "The chatter down here is, 'Is this the best we can do?'" Harpootlian told The Washington Post on Wednesday. "Certainly everyone wants to give a woman a chance to lead this country, but is [Clinton] the woman? There are plenty of other women who would be competitive, whether it’s Elizabeth Warren or Amy Klobuchar or Kirsten Gillibrand." Harpootlian continued his criticisms Thursday on CNN, saying that the assumption that Clinton is the front-runner may save her from having to answer questions during the primary. “Is that what we really want in a presidential candidate and is that really what we want in a president?” Harpootlian asked. "Is she going to lose over the email account? Absolutley not. What I'm saying is this is symptomatic of a larger problem," he said. “She’s got to run the campaign,” Harpootlian said. “I was around Clinton in '92. I was with Obama here in Virginia in '08. I’ll tell you who ran those campaigns: Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Who the hell’s running this campaign?” National Republican figures have suggested Clinton’s conduct regarding the emails will be a campaign issue. "Hillary Clinton must think we’re all suckers," Republican National Committee spokesman Michael Short said in a statement released Wednesday evening. "The fact Hillary Clinton set up a 'homebrewed' email system in her house to skirt federal recordkeeping regulations is a pretty good indicator of just how transparent she’s interested in being." Jeb Bush, one of Clinton’s likely opponents, tweeted a slight at Clinton as soon as the news of her private email domain and servers broke on Monday.

 

Transparency matters. Unclassified @HillaryClinton emails should be released. You can see mine, here. http://t.co/wZbtwd8O2j

— Jeb Bush (@JebBush) March 3, 2015

 

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Hillary Clinton Violated State Department Policy For Nearly Six Years, Official Says

Hillary Clinton Violated State Department Policy For Nearly Six Years, Official Says

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton was in violation of State Department rules governing the use of non-governmental email accounts during her entire tenure as secretary of state, ABC News has learned. A senior State Department official tells ABC News that under rules in place while Mrs. Clinton was secretary of state, employees could only use private email accounts for official business if they turn those emails over to be entered into government computers. This policy is still in place.  Until the private emails are entered into government computers, the official says, an employee is in violation of the rules.Mrs. Clinton used a private email account for her entire tenure as secretary – and did not even have a government-issued email.  Mrs. Clinton did turn over some 55,000 pages of emails to be entered into government computer systems late last year, nearly two years after she stepped down from the State Department.If Mrs. Clinton has now turned over all emails related to official business, she would be in compliance with State Department rules, an official said.  But there is no way to independently verify that she has done that.  Mrs. Clinton’s spokesman says she has turned over about 90 percent of the emails she wrote as secretary of state, withholding only those that were strictly personal and not covered by the policy.State Department email rules became an issue while Mrs. Clinton was secretary of state. One of Mrs. Clinton’s ambassadors was criticized by the Department’s inspector general in a 2012 report for using private email. “It is the Department’s general policy that normal day-to-day operations be conducted on an authorized information system, which has the proper level of security controls,” the Office of Inspector General wrote in the 2012 report. The IG report warns that the use of non-governmental email accounts “increases the risk” of security breaches and the “loss of official public records as these systems do not have approved record preservation or backup functions.” Clinton established her own private email network based out of her Chappaqua, New York, home, where aides say she has personally preserved all messages before turning them over. Mrs. Clinton tweeted late Wednesday that she has asked the State Department to publicly release all the emails she turned over, but has otherwise remained silent on the controversy.Back when she was last ran for president, Mrs. Clinton was quite vocal about other government officials who use private emails which circumvent automatic government archiving.  “Our Constitution is being shredded. We know about the secret wiretaps, the secret military tribunals, the secret White House email accounts,” she said at an event in 2007, indirectly indicting the Republican administration. “It’s a stunning record of secrecy and corruption, of cronyism run amok.”At least one Democrat -- a supporter of Vice President Biden -- lashed out at Mrs. Clinton's email practices in an interview on CNN.“Is that what we really want in a presidential candidate?” former South Carolina Democratic Chairman Dick Harpootlian said in an interview with Jake Tapper on CNN.  “Who the hell’s running this campaign?”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Rick Perry Condemns Iran Negotiations in New Online Video

Rick Perry Condemns Iran Negotiations in New Online Video

Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rick Perry’s PAC released a new online video on Thursday in which he criticizes, point-by-point, the nuclear deal the United States is seeking with Iran. At the end of the video, which was first reported by The Weekly Standard, Perry says the next president should not be bound by any agreement President Obama signs if Congress doesn’t support it.“An arms control agreement that excludes our Congress, damages our security, and endangers our allies has to be reconsidered by any future president. We must not allow the incompetence of one administration to damage our country’s security for years and decades to come,” Perry said.The video places Perry in front of all the other 2016 potential candidates on the issue, shortly after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress and the AIPAC conference.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Washington, DC Residents Defy Sledding Ban on Capitol Grounds

Washington, DC Residents Defy Sledding Ban on Capitol Grounds

hroe/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Heavy snow blanketed Capitol Hill on Thursday, producing a widespread urge to sled down Washington’s most iconic slopes. The only problem? Sledding is banned on Capitol Grounds, dumbfounding many of DC’s residents.“You're saying we can't sled on Capitol Hill?” one resident said in disbelief. “God.” Nevertheless, dozens of DC residents and their children defied the ban, facing off against Capitol Police officers tasked with enforcement.“Capitol regulations as stated are that there is no sledding or skiing on Capitol grounds for life safety and property damage issues,” USCP Lt. Eric Graves told people who had gathered to sled on a bunny hill on the West Front of the Capitol. “The main point being that there are sprinkler heads and stuff buried in the ground and we're seriously concerned about people coming to an abrupt stop or causing the sleds to flip over. That's why we ask people not to sled on Capitol grounds.”But Graves’ warning didn’t deter anybody from a little fun.“I understand your regulations, but we're going to do a little more sledding here,” one man told Graves, turning away to resume playing with his kids.Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-DC, pleaded with the Capitol Police board to lift the ban through the snowy weekend, but her request was quickly denied Wednesday night.Many of DC’s residents don’t understand the justification.“What is the threat of letting a 10-year-old and a seven-year-old sled down Capitol Hill?” one woman asked incredulously.Capitol Hill resident Ellen Adams brought her twin daughters Charlotte and Kendall, and hopes that beyond a day in the snow, they’ll take an important lesson home. “It's ridiculous, I mean, it's such a great hill. It's just such a fun activity for the kids here on Capitol Hill,” Adams said. “I'm trying to teach them about civil disobedience.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Rep. Chris Van Hollen Declares Candidacy for US Senate

Rep. Chris Van Hollen Declares Candidacy for US Senate

US Congress(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Chris Van Hollen, one of the Democrats’ brightest stars in the House of Representatives, has decided to make a run to fill the Senate seat of retiring Sen. Barbara Mikulski.

“I am excited to share that I have decided to run for the United States Senate from our great State of Maryland,” Van Hollen writes in a statement posted on his Facebook page Wednesday. “I am very much looking forward to the upcoming campaign and a healthy exchange of ideas.”

Van Hollen, 56, was widely seen as a possible replacement to House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, once she steps down as leader of the caucus.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Hillary Clinton Email Mystery Man: What We Know About Eric Hoteham

Hillary Clinton Email Mystery Man: What We Know About Eric Hoteham

Scott Olson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- One of the biggest mysteries surrounding the discovery that Hillary Clinton used a personal email account and private server during her time as secretary of State was the fact that the system was registered to a man who no one had ever heard of.Who was Eric Hoteham? And why did have at least three different email domains -- clintonemail.com, wjcoffice.com and presidentclinton.com -- registered in his name even though the domains apparently were based in the former first couple’s home in suburban New York?Efforts to locate public records related to anyone named Eric Hoteham were unsuccessful, in a search that included donor records, birth records or property records.There is, however, an Eric Hothem who is named as a Clinton aide in a Washington Post article from 2001. At the time, he reportedly dismissed concerns from the White House chief usher who believed that, when leaving the White House at the end of President Bill Clinton's second term, the couple took pieces of furniture that should have remained in the White House.Hothem was also mentioned in a House Government Reform Committee Report from 2002. In the report, he was identified as "an aide to first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton" who sent a wire transfer of $15,000 to Roger Clinton, Bill Clinton's brother.

Hothem's lawyer deferred to the first couple's lawyer, David Kendall, who said that the account for which Hothem was the custodian was the personal Citibank account of the former president and his wife, then a U.S. senator. Kendall said the money was a loan to Roger Clinton to help him obtain legal counsel for the committee's investigation.On top of that, Hothem is thanked in Hillary Clinton’s 2003 memoir, Living History.Hothem’s connection to the Clintons appears to drop off the public record shortly after the Clintons' time in the White House ended.But right around that time, in October 2002, a man named Eric Hothem began working at Citigroup, according to financial records database BrightScope. He moved to JP Morgan in May 2013.Hothem did not answer requests for comment Wednesday and JP Morgan had “no comment” when asked about the story.Although ABC News has not been able to definitively link them, The New York Times reported that the current JP Morgan employee is the same man as Hillary Clinton's former aide.One difficulty connecting the man who registered the Clinton domain names to the former first lady’s aide stemmed from the differences in the spelling of the names.However, according to Jonathan Mayer, a computer science expert at Stanford University, there are often contradictions or typographical errors in server records, so it could be a spelling error.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Prosecutors Challenge Colorado Recreational Marijuana Law

Prosecutors Challenge Colorado Recreational Marijuana Law

iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- County sheriffs and prosecutors from three states launched a court challenge Thursday against Colorado’s legalized marijuana, claiming that huge amounts of weed crossing state lines is placing an “undue burden” on the resources of small departments.Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 legalizing recreational marijuana in November 2012. Retail stores began selling weed on Jan. 1, 2014, but marijuana is still considered illegal by the federal government."Amendment 64 is preempted by federal law and therefore violates the Supremacy Clause (Article VI) of the United States Constitution,” according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in federal court.The plaintiffs -- six Colorado sheriffs, four Nebraska sheriffs along with two county attorneys from Nebraska and Kansas -- want the relevant sections of the Colorado constitution declared “invalid, null, and void.”Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Thursday, Sheriff Mark Overman of Scott’s Bluff County, Nebraska says Colorado’s marijuana is a burden on taxpayers in his jurisdiction.“Colorado’s legalization of marijuana has completely changed the landscape involving the marijuana that we encounter,” he said. “Because of Amendment 64, our jails are full, our court dockets are full. There are increased costs for overtime, for incarceration.”Overman also claims his deputies are busting more kids for pot.“We are seeing a marked increase in the numbers of children as young as 13 that we are finding in possession of marijuana. We don’t want what Colorado has," he said.Larimer County Colorado Sheriff Justin Smith also said legalized marijuana in his state has created a “constitutional showdown” for law enforcement.“In Colorado every elected official, sheriffs included, are required under the state constitution to take an oath of office,” Smith said. “And that oath of office requires that they swear to defend the Constitution of the United States and the state of Colorado. Amendment 64 puts a conflict in those two parts of the oath of office.”The Justice Department has said it will not take legal action against states that have approved recreational marijuana use.Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is named as the defendant in the lawsuit filed Thursday.Hickenlooper has not been formally served with the lawsuit, said his spokeswoman Kathy Green.However, Green told ABC News, “We will continue to defend the will of the voters while prioritizing public safety.”Marijuana advocates say the lawsuit is frivolous."These guys need to get over it,” said Mason Tyvert with the Marijuana Policy Project."These law enforcement officers are trying to force marijuana cultivation and sales back into the underground market. Colorado adopted these laws in order to start controlling marijuana, and it's working,” Tyvert told ABC News.Recreational marijuana is now legal in Alaska, Colorado, Washington state and Washington, D.C.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Top Congressional Leaders Urge Obama to Extend ‘Lethal’ Aid to Ukraine

Top Congressional Leaders Urge Obama to Extend ‘Lethal’ Aid to UkraineAlex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- House Speaker John Boehner and a bipartisan group of senior congressional leaders want President Obama to beef up Ukraine's military, including the transfer of lethal defensive weapons systems, urging the president...

What Hillary Clinton Said About Email in 2000

What Hillary Clinton Said About Email in 2000

Peter Paul(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton didn't like using email in 2000, and in light of the recent questions being raised over her personal email account, she may not now either.Footage from a 2001 report by ABC News' Brian Ross about a disgruntled donor shows then-Sen. Clinton talking about how she had chosen to avoid email for fear of a paper trail."As much as I’ve been investigated and all of that, you know, why would I -- I don’t even want -- why would I ever want to do e-mail?" she's seen on tape telling Peter Paul on home video captured at a fundraiser."Can you imagine?" she said.Times changed and Clinton used email throughout her tenure as secretary of state, but questions that are being asked now stem from her decision not to use a government-backed email service.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Hillary Clinton Responds to Email Controversy

Hillary Clinton Responds to Email Controversy

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Hillary Clinton addressed concerns Wednesday about her use of a personal email account during her term as secretary of state, expressing a desire to release her emails.“I want the public to see my email. I asked State to release them. They said they will review them for release as soon as possible,” Clinton wrote on Twitter.

I want the public to see my email. I asked State to release them. They said they will review them for release as soon as possible.

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) March 5, 2015

State Department Deputy Spokesperson Marie Harf, in a statement that followed Clinton's tweet, said the department is focused on reviewing Clinton's emails."The State Department will review for public release the emails provided by Secretary Clinton to the Department, using a normal process that guides such releases. We will undertake this review as quickly as possible; given the sheer volume of the document set, this review will take some time to complete," the statement reads.Clinton’s team submitted 55,000 pages of emails to the State Department -- but an unknown number of emails that do not pertain to work will not be turned over, a Clinton aide told ABC News.The storage of Clinton’s emails has come under scrutiny after a New York Times report revealed that she used a personal, non-governmental email address to conduct official business as secretary of state. Clinton used only one email address during her tenure, her attorney David Kendall wrote in an email to the House Select Committee, which is tasked with investigating the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi. The committee sent subpoenas to the State Department Wednesday requesting all of Clinton's communications related to Libya.“The Select Committee on Benghazi today issued subpoenas for all communications of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton related to Libya and to the State Department for other individuals who have information pertinent to the investigation,” Jamal Ware, communications director for the committee, wrote in a statement. “The Committee also has issued preservation letters to internet firms informing them of their legal obligation to protect all relevant documents.”The email account that Clinton used while working at the State Department was hdr22@clintonemail.com and was traced to a server based out of Chappaqua, where she and former President Bill Clinton have a home, ABC News confirmed.ABC News also learned that another email domain, wjcoffice.com, which used the former president's initials as their descriptor, was also based out of Chappaqua. That domain was registered by an individual called Eric Hoteham, the same name used to register the clintonemail.com domain.Clinton has yet to explain why she used her own server and personal email, instead of a State Department email address to comply with federal record-keeping requirements.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Senate Fails to Override Keystone Veto

Senate Fails to Override Keystone Veto

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Senate could not muster up enough votes Wednesday to put the Keystone XL pipeline back in play.The bill on reconsideration failed to pass with a vote of 62 to 57, with eight Senate Democrats voting in favor of overriding the presidential veto. The vote required support of two-thirds of the Senate to pass. The legislation would have authorized construction of an $8 billion pipeline to transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast.  President Obama said the State Department is still conducting its review of whether the pipeline is in the national interest.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Defense Sec. Carter, Gen. Dempsey Update Congress on ISIS, Sequestration Cuts

Defense Sec. Carter, Gen. Dempsey Update Congress on ISIS, Sequestration Cuts

DoD photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sean Hurt (WASHINGTON) -- During a second day of Department of Defense budget hearings, Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Gen. Martin Dempsey took questions on the situation in Iraq and Iran’s role in the Tikrit offensive. Both said on Wednesday they want to ensure that Iraq’s government gets the message that there can’t be a return to the sectarianism that led to ISIS’s resurgence.   “Sectarianism is one of the things that concerns me very much,” said Carter.  “And of course, it's the root of the Iranian presence in Iraq.” Carter said the hope is that an inclusive Iraqi government will promote stability and “the fastest route to the defeat of ISIL.”  House Appropriations Defense Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-NJ, sounded skeptical, cautioning, “Hope is not a plan.”With regards to the AUMF, Carter explained that its three-year duration is due to the political cycle and was not a military requirement. “I think it has to do with the political calendar in our country,” said Carter.  “I wouldn't assure anyone that this will be over in three years or that the campaign will be completed in three years. The three years comes from the fact that there'll be a presidential election in two years and so forth, and I respect that. That's not a military or a defense consideration, but I respect it as a constitutional consideration.” Both Carter and Dempsey repeated the line that they’ll recommend potential changes to the ISIS strategy if it’s needed down the road, which could include the addition of U.S. ground troops.   “If the commander on the ground approaches either me or the secretary of defense and believes that the introduction of special operations forces to accompany Iraqis or the new Syrian forces, or JTACS, these skilled folks who can call in close air support, if we believe that's necessary to achieve our objectives, we will make that recommendation,” Dempsey said.  Dempsey added those possibilities are allowed by the AUMF request.When contacted for comment on if the U.S. might someday consider sending some U.S. troops to Syria, his spokesman said Dempsey was speaking about a hypothetical and that “there is no consideration of sending U.S. troops into Syria beyond personnel recovery/combat rescue forces if necessary as the air campaign continues. ”Dempsey noted the presence of Iranians in the Tikrit offensive and that it’s being watched carefully. He said Sunni politicians in Baghdad and Tikrit support the offensive because it’s targeting ISIS, but “if this becomes an excuse to ethnic cleanse then our campaign has a problem and we’re going to have to adjust our campaign.”Since it was a budget hearing, Carter urged Congress to prevent another round of mandated sequestration cuts that would kick in later this year.   If the cuts continue over the next few years he warned they would change the size and shape of the military but would also significantly affect the ability to carry out the national defense strategy. “We cannot meet sequester with further half-measures,” said Carter.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Congressional Black Caucus Works to Find Positive Aspects of AG’s Ferguson Report

Congressional Black Caucus Works to Find Positive Aspects of AG’s Ferguson Report

RedTackArts/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Members of the Congressional Black Caucus decried the Department of Justice’s decision not to charge Darren Wilson with a crime related to the death of Michael Brown last summer in Ferguson, Missouri, but praised the overall assessment of the Attorney General’s report, which found a pattern and practice of discriminatory policing.“The far-reaching report announced today represents an important path forward towards achieving equal justice under the law in Ferguson, Missouri and repairing some of the deep divisions and very real disparity in local law enforcement, which that community has endured for far too long,” Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C., the chairman of the CBC, said during a news conference Wednesday afternoon.Rep. William Lacy Clay, the Democratic congressman who represents Ferguson, also tried to highlight the positive aspects of the report, but added his disappointment over the DOJ’s decision not to charge Wilson.“While I’m extremely disappointed that Mike Brown’s killer will not face criminal charges, his death has forced our nation to begin a long-overdue conversation on race and the disparities it continues to perpetuate for too many Americans,” Clay, D-Missouri, said. “We know that there was a miscarriage of justice at the local level on the part of the St. Louis County prosecutor,” Clay added. “The way the case was presented to the grand jury, the fault of the grand jury system. All of that came into play in this case, and it’s unfortunate.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Privacy Trumps Security in Clinton’s Choice to Use Personal Email Server, Expert Says

Privacy Trumps Security in Clinton’s Choice to Use Personal Email Server, Expert Says

Photo by Feng Li/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The storage of Hillary Clinton's emails while she was in office has come under scrutiny since it was revealed that she used a personal, non-governmental email address to conduct official business as secretary of state, but a tech expert says the biggest benefit of using a personal server to store an individual email domain is "complete control" over what can be stored and deleted. "Basically you can decide what gets preserved and what doesn’t," information technology consultant Bruce Webster told ABC News. "You have direct immediate monitoring what’s going on and part of it is just you don’t want anyone else looking at what’s been deleted and where and what’s coming in."Clinton is not the only likely 2016 presidential candidate who purposefully used a private server to host their government emails. ABC News can confirm that Jeb Bush used a personal server while he was governor of Florida. According to an aide, it was housed in the governor’s office. "Governor Bush’s office complied with public records laws throughout his administration and beyond," spokesperson Kristy Campbell told ABC News. "His emails have been available via public records requests to the state following his time as Governor and a set resides with the Florida Department of State for historic and archival value." In theory, there is no way of knowing whether every email that was originally on a personal server has been transferred over to a different server because personal servers can be wiped clean without any secondary trace of a message. But, in the case of Bush he released those emails not only to the Florida Department of State, but also to the public earlier this year. Florida has expansive open records laws and this release is required. ABC News was able to obtain copies of his emails at the end of last year due to the state’s open records law. With a private server, "Nothing is ever stored anywhere...no one else has any other copy of it," Webster told ABC News. Webster said that having a personal server is an extreme and rare step that does not inherently make it more secure and people who take this step often hire someone to manage it. "It’s the sort of thing hardcore computer geeks tend to do," Webster said. On Wednesday Clinton’s attorney David Kendall sent an email to the House Select Committee tasked with investigating the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, confirming that in spite of claims made by a Republican congressman, Clinton used only one email address during her tenure and the reason she changed it was because it was publicly released on a news site in 2013. “Secretary Clinton used one email account when corresponding with anyone, from Department officials to friends to family,” Kendall said in his email. The email account that Clinton used while working at the State Department, according to The AP, was hdr22@clintonemail.com, and was traced to a server based out of Chappaqua, where she and former President Bill Clinton have a home. ABC News can confirm that another email domain, wjcoffice.com, which used the former president's initials as their descriptor, was also based out of Chappaqua. Internet records obtained by ABC News show that second domain, wjcoffice.com, was registered by an individual called Eric Hoteham. The AP reports that the same name was used to register the clintonemail.com domain. Efforts to locate public records related to anyone named Eric Hoteham, however, were unsuccessful, in a search that included donor records, birth records, or property records. There is, however, an Eric Hothem who is named as a Clinton aide in a Washington Post article from 2001. At the time, he reportedly dismissed concerns from the White House chief usher who believed that, when leaving the White House at the end of Clinton's second term, the couple took pieces of furniture that should have remained in the White House. Hothem is also thanked in Clinton’s 2003 memoir Living History. An Eric Hothem who works at JPMorgan did not answer requests for comment Wednesday and JPMorgan had “no comment” when asked about the story. On Wednesday evening, Clinton, along with her husband and their daughter Chelsea, will be celebrating at the Clinton Foundation’s annual gala in New York City. The musical guest is Carole King, and Neil Patrick Harris will also appear. Tickets range from $2,500 all the way up to $100,000 for “event chairs,” but it is closed to the press.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

House Select Committee on Benghazi Seeks All of Hillary Clinton’s Private Emails

House Select Committee on Benghazi Seeks All of Hillary Clinton’s Private Emails

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- After news spread that Hillary Clinton relied exclusively on a personal email account while she served as secretary of state, the House Select Committee on Benghazi has sent subpoenas to the State Department Wednesday explicitly requesting all of her communications related to Libya. “The Select Committee on Benghazi today (Wednesday) issued subpoenas for all communications of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton related to Libya and to the State Department for other individuals who have information pertinent to the investigation,” Jamal Ware, communications director for the committee, wrote in a statement. “The Committee also has issued preservation letters to internet firms informing them of their legal obligation to protect all relevant documents.” The documents are the latest request from Rep. Trey Gowdy, the chairman of the committee, as his investigation into the deadly attack continues. “You do not need a law degree to have an understanding of how troubling this is,” Gowdy told reporters. “There are chain of custody issues, there are preservation of materials and documents issues...there are best evidence issues, in addition to asking about archives and what safeguards may have been in place to protect this information." While Gowdy stressed that Clinton had “more than one” private email account that she used during her tenure at the State Department, her lawyer wrote the committee today hoping to clear up any misconception. “Secretary Clinton used one email account when corresponding with anyone, from Department officials to friends to family,” Clinton’s attorney David E. Kendall wrote in an email to the committee. "A month after she left the Department, Gawker published her email address and so she changed the address on her account. At the time, the emails were provided to the Department last year this new address appeared on the copies as the ‘sender,’ and not the address she used as Secretary. This address on the account did not exist until March 2103 [sic], after her tenure as Secretary.” Nevertheless, Ware maintained that “the Select Committee on Benghazi is in possession of records with two separate and distinct email addresses used by former Secretary Clinton and dated during the time she was Secretary of State.” "Without access to the relevant electronic information and stored data on the server -- which was reportedly registered to her home -- there is no way the Committee, or anyone else, can fully explain why the Committee uncovered two email addresses,” Ware said in a statement. “As Chairman Gowdy has noted, this is why former Secretary Clinton’s exclusive use of personal emails to conduct official U.S. government business is so problematic and raises significant issues for transparency. The American people have a right to a full accounting of all the former Secretary’s emails, and the Committee is committed to working to uncover all the facts.” Gowdy said the committee discovered the existence of Clinton’s personal email accounts after obtaining documents late last summer that had not been previously produced to any committee investigating the deadly terrorist attack. "The fact is the State Department cannot certify they have produced all of former Secretary Clinton’s emails because they do not have all of former Secretary Clinton’s emails, nor do they control access to them,” Gowdy said. “The State Department is relying on Secretary Clinton herself and her attorneys and advisors to tell us and to tell you what emails they think are to be preserved.” Asked whether he still intends to call on Clinton to testify at the committee, Gowdy suggested the emails will lead to an invitation for the former secretary of state to sit down behind closed doors with committee investigators. “This revelation, which we’ve known about which has now been made public, may well lay the groundwork for additional conversations with the secretary in some setting or another,” he said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Lawmakers Push Capitol Police to Grant Freedom to Capitol Hill Sledders

Lawmakers Push Capitol Police to Grant Freedom to Capitol Hill Sledders

hroe/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Powdery snow after a big snowfall begs for a good sledding outing -- but on Capitol Hill, sledding is a giant no-no. However, a few lawmakers are pushing the Capitol Police Board to lift its ban on sledding for the next four days as a major snowstorm moves into the Washington, D.C. area. “This could be the last snowstorm the D.C. area gets this winter, and may be one of the best for sledding in years,” Washington, D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton wrote in a letter to U.S. Capitol Police Board Chair Frank Larkin. “Children and their parents should able to enjoy sledding on one of the best hills in the city. This is a one-time waiver that will allow D.C. kids to sled while we await a more formal review of the ban, which will likely come after the last snow has fallen in our region.” “Have a heart, Mr. Larkin, a kid’s heart that is,” she added. Norton has asked the board to grant a temporary waiver to allow sledding on the Capitol Grounds from Thursday through Sunday, and wants a review of the entire policy to follow. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, who worked as a Capitol Police Officer while attending law school at Georgetown, echoed the sentiment.

 

Co-sign RT @EleanorNorton: I just wrote to U.S. Capitol Police requesting a waiver of the sledding ban for Thur-Sun: https://t.co/Ny32wyW6fP

— Senator Harry Reid (@SenatorReid) March 4, 2015

 

The Capitol Police Board Code of Traffic Regulations for the United States Capitol Grounds outlines the rules for traffic activities on Capitol Hill -- including snow-related activities. It specifically says all forms of sledding are off-limits. “No person shall coast or slide a sled within Capitol Grounds,” the regulations read. What about snowmobiling?  That’s only allowed if on a “street closed by the Capitol Police Board to motor vehicular traffic due to conditions of ice or snow.” And skiing? That’s banned too unless you’re using “cross-country skis or snowshoes as a means for transportation.” The Capitol Police is responsible for enforcing the regulations, which they expect to do on Thursday. “The USCP will continue to work with the Capitol Police Board to ensure the safety and security of the Capitol Campus,” Capitol Police Lieutenant Kimberly Schneider said. Earlier this year, a few snow enthusiasts were able to sneak in a quick sled down the hill of the Capitol Grounds, so stay tuned for potential sledding mischief in the next few days -- ban or no ban.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Ben Carson Has Found Himself in Hot Water These Five Times

Ben Carson Has Found Himself in Hot Water These Five Times

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Just two days after launching his exploratory committee, potential Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson found himself in hot water for arguing on CNN that prison proves homosexuality is “absolutely” a choice. "Because a lot of people who go into prison go into prison straight -- and when they come out, they're gay. So, did something happen while they were in there?” the retired neurosurgeon said Wednesday morning. “Ask yourself that question.” Carson’s comments sparked outrage from the Human Rights Campaign. "Ben Carson is putting his own personal ambition ahead of medical science by suggesting that a person can change their sexual orientation,” HRC’s Vice President of Communications Fred Sainz said in a statement on Wednesday. “As a doctor, Carson surely knows that countless mental health and medical organizations have condemned the idea that you can change a person’s sexual orientation. “The only thing that’s really been proven here is that when Ben Carson says what he really thinks, he reveals himself as utterly unfit for office.” This is not the first time Carson has found his name in a headline next to the word “controversial.” Scrutiny of his past comments has led Carson to clarify his statements more than once. ‘POORLY CHOSEN WORDS’ ON HOMOSEXUALITY Carson’s views on homosexuality have sparked outrage before. “Marriage is between a man and a woman, it’s a well-established fundamental pillar of society,” Carson said in an interview with FOX News’ Sean Hannity in 2013. “No group, be they gays, be they NAMBLA [North American Man-Boy Love Association], be they people who believe in bestiality, it doesn’t matter what they are. They don’t get to change the definition.” “It’s not something that’s against gays, it’s against anybody who wants to come along and change the fundamental definitions of pillars of society,” he added. Enraged by Carson’s comparison of homosexuality with bestiality and pedophilia, students at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine petitioned the school to jettison him as their commencement speaker. Carson, who was director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, voluntarily stepped down as commencement speaker and apologized for his comments, saying in a letter to the dean, “My poorly chosen words caused pain for some members of our community and for that I offer a most sincere and heartfelt apology...Although I do believe marriage is between a man and a woman, there are much less offensive ways to make that point.” ISIS AND US PATRIOTS ‘WILLING TO DIE’ At the RNC winter meeting earlier this year, Carson made what some saw as an inappropriate comparison between ISIS and America’s Revolutionary War heroes. "A bunch of rag-tag militiamen defeated the most powerful and professional military force on the planet. Why? Because they believed in what they were doing. They were willing to die for what they believed in," Carson, 63, said, according to NBC News. "Fast forward to today. What do we have? You've got ISIS. They've got the wrong philosophy, but they're willing to die for it while we are busily giving away every belief and every value for the sake of political correctness. We have to change that." In an interview with FOX News' Bill O’Reilly, Carson reiterated that he was “not saying that as a comparison between our patriots and ISIS.” OBAMACARE – WORST THING ‘SINCE SLAVERY' A fierce opponent of the Affordable Care Act, Carson made headlines back in 2013 for equating Obamacare to slavery. “I have to tell you, you know Obamacare is really, I think, the worst thing that has happened in this nation since slavery,” Carson, who’s African-American, said at the conservative Values Voters Summit in 2013. “And it is slavery in a way because it is making all of us subservient to the government.” Carson addressed his remarks on Fox and Friends, saying, “The issue that I was bringing up is not slavery. The issue is that we have taken the most important thing we have as free Americans and turned it over to the government.” ‘WE ARE VERY MUCH LIKE NAZI GERMANY’ “We are very much like Nazi Germany,” Carson said in an interview with Breitbart News last March. “And I know you’re not supposed to say ‘Nazi Germany,’ but I don’t care about political correctness. You know, you had a government using its tools to intimidate the population. We now live in a society where people are afraid to say what they actually believe.” Carson doubled down on his statements more than once, most recently telling CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, “What you were doing is allowing words to affect you more than listening to what was actually being said. And that's part of the problem. You are just focusing on the words 'Nazi Germany' and completely missing the point of what is being said."

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Obamacare and How to Read the Supreme Court Tea Leaves

Obamacare and How to Read the Supreme Court Tea Leaves

trekandshoot/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Supreme Court Wednesday morning weighed which states’ residents the Obama administration is legally entitled to provide insurance subsidies to under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare. The case came about when some Virginians who receive subsidies to buy health insurance on healthcare.gov sued the government, saying they shouldn’t be getting the subsidies.

They say they’re hurt by the money because without it, they wouldn’t have to buy insurance at all: The ACA requires people to buy insurance, but exempts anyone who would have to spend more than 8 percent of their annual income on health insurance. When the law talks about how subsidies are calculated, it refers to customers of Exchanges “established by the State,” and doesn’t mention Exchanges established by the federal government. But when Obama’s IRS passed regulations to implement the law, they gave subsidies to customers of both state and federal exchanges. The plaintiffs are trying to prevent the issuance of subsidies to customers of federal exchanges. ABC News’ legal consultant, Kate Shaw, was in the courtroom as the justices took turns grilling the lawyers for the plaintiffs and the government. Shaw knows the room well. She is an assistant professor of Law at the Benjamin R. Cardozo School of Law in New York, but a few years ago she was a law clerk for former Justice John Paul Stevens. Q: What was it like in the room? The stakes are high, so the room was charged. A number of members of Congress were there. The pace of the questioning was very quick. There were moments of humor: Associate Justice Elena Kagan made reference to the “never-ending saga” that is challenging the Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice John Roberts ribbed the lawyer for the plaintiffs, the Solicitor General Donald Verrilli took a dig at Congress, and laughter punctuated the argument several times. Q: Who were the lawyers making the case for the plaintiffs and for the government? Verrilli represents the government before the Supreme Court. Despite the fact that the justices gave him a hard time at oral argument in the first lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act, he was successful then in his defense of the statute. Michael Carvin is a partner at the D.C. law firm Jones Day. He was one of the lawyers challenging the constitutionality of the ACA last year and the justices were clearly very familiar with him, sometimes referring back to arguments he’d made in last year’s case. Q: What’s this case about? The ACA did a number of different things, and this case is about only two of them. First, it’s about the creation of federal subsidies for people who can’t afford to buy health insurance. And second, it’s about the “exchanges” where people can shop for health insurance. It directed states to set up these exchanges, but it also provided that if states failed to act, the federal government would set up exchanges instead. Some states set up their own exchanges; the majority, 34, did not. You’ve described why the people who are suing the administration say subsidies shouldn’t go to anyone on a federal exchange: two places where the statute refers only to an exchange established “by the state.” The Obama administration says this is nonsensical, based on both the language of the statute and its overall purpose. “Established by the state,” they claim, means either the state or the federal government acting in the state’s stead. The plaintiffs’ argument would mean that the law created federal exchanges that were doomed immediately: without federal subsidies, you’d only have the sickest people buying insurance on the Exchange. Q: What happens next? Well, if the Court sides with the government, nothing changes. If the Court decides the subsidies aren’t available in the states with federal exchanges, then the question becomes when and how the decision takes effect. The government has said, including in oral arguments, that if the Court sides with the challengers, “The tax credits will be cut off immediately.” I think that has been the assumption until today. But Associate Justice Samuel Alito raised another possibility this morning: that the Court might stay its decision until the end of the tax year, in order to allow people, and maybe Congress and the states, to prepare for the consequences of the decision. Q: What could we tell from the Justices’ questions? It seemed pretty clear coming out of the argument that Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Kagan had little sympathy for the challengers’ position. Justices Antonin Scalia and Alito, by contrast, seemed persuaded by the challengers’ textual argument; that the text was so clear that there was only one possible result (and that if dire consequences followed, it was Congress’ job to step in). Justice Clarence Thomas asked no questions but he, like Justices Scalia and Alito, seems likely to side with the plaintiffs. So the key votes are Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy. Chief Justice Roberts asked very few questions, so it was hard to get much of a sense from him. Justice Kennedy seemed sympathetic to the challengers’ textual argument, but he also asked a number of questions that suggested that the challengers’ reading of the law raised states-rights concern.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Ferguson Report: Rampant Racism and Other Findings from Probe

Ferguson Report: Rampant Racism and Other Findings from Probe

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Department of Justice on Wednesday released its investigation of the Ferguson, Missouri Police Department, finding a pattern and practice of discriminatory policing.The report includes seven racist emails sent by Ferguson officers. In its review, the Justice Department also found 161 use of force complaints against Ferguson police from 2010 to 2014. Only one case was founded and no officer was disciplined.“As detailed in our report, this investigation found a community that was deeply polarized, and where deep distrust and hostility often characterized interactions between police and area residents,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “Our investigation showed that Ferguson police officers routinely violate the Fourth Amendment in stopping people without reasonable suspicion, arresting them without probable cause, and using unreasonable force against them. Now that our investigation has reached its conclusion, it is time for Ferguson’s leaders to take immediate, wholesale and structural corrective action."Holder added that the report is "only the beginning of a necessarily resource-intensive and inclusive process to promote reconciliation, to reduce and eliminate bias, and to bridge gaps and build understanding.”The conclusions come nearly seven months after a confrontation with officer Darren Wilson left 18-year-old Michael Brown dead.Separately on Wednesday, the DOJ announced that Wilson will not be charged in Brown's death.Here is a sampling of some of the 100-page report's most scathing findings:RACIST E-MAILS

A May 2011 email stated -- “An African-American woman in New Orleans was admitted into the hospital for a pregnancy termination. Two weeks later she received a check for $5,000. She phoned the hospital to ask who it was from. The hospital said, ‘Crimestoppers.’” A November 2008 email read -- “President Barack Obama would not be President for very long" because “what black man holds a steady job for four years.” An email described a man seeking to obtain “welfare" for his dogs because they are “mixed in color, unemployed, lazy, can’t speak English and have no frigging clue who their Daddies are.” (June 2011) An April 2011 email depicted President Obama as a chimpanzee. A December 2011 email included jokes based on offensive stereotypes about Muslims. An October 2011 email included a photo of a bare-chested group of dancing women, apparently in Africa, with the caption, “Michelle Obama’s High School Reunion.”

POLICING PRACTICES

"Conducting stops without reasonable suspicion and arrests without probable cause" -- both violations of the Fourth Amendment, according to the DOJ. Focused on revenue over public safety, leading to court practices that violate the 14th Amendment’s due process.

RACIAL BIAS

Harmful municipal court and police practices are due, at least in part, to intentional discrimination as "demonstrated by direct evidence of racial bias and stereotyping about African Americans by certain Ferguson police and municipal court officials," according to the DOJ.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Gabby Giffords to Congress: ‘The Nation’s Counting on You’

Gabby Giffords to Congress: ‘The Nation’s Counting on You’

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call(WASHINGTON) -- A little over four years since surviving an assassination attempt, former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords once again returned to Capitol Hill to help reintroduce legislation that aims to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and the mentally ill by expanding background checks to anyone making a commercial purchase of a firearm.“Stopping gun violence takes courage,” Giffords, a former Democrat from Arizona, said during her brief remarks. “Now is the time to come together. Be responsible. Democrats, Republicans, everyone.”The bill, formally called the “Public Safety and Second Amendment Rights Protection Act,” stalled in the last Congress, but Republican co-sponsor Rep. Robert Dold predicted it would pass if House Speaker John Boehner allows a vote.“Are we going to get 100 percent? No way. But I think there is an opportunity to be able to put it on the floor and if it does go to the floor, I’m confident it would pass the House,” Dold, R-Ill., said. “We need to get a vote on the bill, and when we do, we’ll get it passed,” Rep. Mike Thompson, chair of the House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force, agreed. “It’s about using the background check system to make sure that folks who buy guns through a commercial sale have their background check to make sure that we aren’t selling guns to someone who’s dangerously mentally ill, someone who is a domestic abuser, or someone who is a criminal.”Giffords, who delivered her remarks without the use of a script, urged lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to act.“We must never stop fighting. Fight fight fight,” she said. “Be bold, be courageous. The nation’s counting on you.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Page 1 of 580123Next ›Last »

Advertise With Us

Would you like to advertise on East Idaho News? Fill out this form to contact a representative.
  • Full and Last
  • The name of your company, business or brand.