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Canada’s Glaciers Could Shrink by 70 Percent, New Study Says

Canada’s Glaciers Could Shrink by 70 Percent, New Study Says Jason Krupa/USGS(NEW YORK) -- Thousands of glaciers in the Canadian West could shrink by 70 percent over the next century, according to a new study published in Nature Geoscience. The research represents a new way of predicting glacier depletion that has implications for scientists across the globe, especially in South America and Asia where glacial melt is expected to hit hardest.“We’re hoping to pass off this work to other scientists in those regions,” said Garry Clarke, lead author of the study and professor emeritus of glaciology for the University of British Columbia.Whereas previous studies on glacial melt primarily focused on the snowpack that replenishes glaciers, Clarke’s study focuses on how glaciers break up over time and where their water will flow under four climate scenarios outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2014.The study, which was published Monday after taking a decade to complete, predicts many of Canada’s glaciers will disappear entirely, claiming “few glaciers will remain in the Interior and Rockies region” and those in northwestern British Columbia will only “survive in a diminished state.”The retreat of mountain glaciers, which the scientific community generally asserts is caused by human-caused climate change, is a significant contributor to sea-level rise, and has potential implications for “aquatic ecosystems, agriculture, forestry, alpine tourism and water quality,” according to the study.“The glaciers don’t respond to the weather, they’re responding to the climate,” Clarke said. “So if you want an objective measure of the climate the glaciers are telling us.”The study’s findings come as Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper backpedals on Canada’s environmental and climate commitments made during his predecessor's tenure. Under Harper, Canada has slashed funding for conservation research, amended or repealed nearly two dozen environmental laws, and became the only participant to summarily withdraw from the emissions-cutting Kyoto Protocol in 2011.In February, activists opposing controversial tar sands development in Alberta stormed the Toronto Stock Exchange demanding fossil fuel divestment. Later that month, a leaked intelligence assessment by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police revealed that police were being instructed to treat climate activists as terrorists that comprised a “growing and violent threat to Canada’s security.”“I am not impressed by the present government approach to dealing with the climate question,” Clarke said, adding that the government had “suppressed the scientific community” and pointing to the Harper administration’s refusal to renew funding for the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences when funds ran out in 2011.Canada’s government has invested $10 billion in green infrastructure projects and focused on regulating electricity, transportation and coal plants, in an effort to reduce greenhouse gases. But environmental activists argue the sector-by-sector approach lacks an overall implementation plan designed to reach the country’s goal of a 17-percent emissions reduction by 2020.“Harper’s support for tar sands expansion and Arctic drilling run contrary to scientific evidence of a changed climate,” Farrah Khan, arctic campaigner for Greenpeace, said of two activities that contribute to climate-changing greenhouse gases.Environment Canada did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Mysterious Wall of Foam Appears on Canal After UK Chemical Plant Fire

Mysterious Wall of Foam Appears on Canal After UK Chemical Plant Fire Hayley Third/@helloiamhayley(CLAYTON, England) -- A mysterious wall of foam appeared on a canal in northern England after firefighters battled a blaze at a chemical plant -- but officials said initial tests did not detect adverse effects on the waterway.There were no reports of injuries, but the blaze Sunday in Clayton, England, caused a huge smoke plume to billow over parts of Greater Manchester, according to a Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority statement, and local residents were asked to stay indoors Sunday and Monday.Crews used a variety of water jets to bring the fire under control and reported that the foam had started appearing in nearby water following the incident, the statement added.Fire and rescue station manager Paul Smitham confirmed one of the structures involved in the fire stores chemicals. The company, Carbogen Amcis Ltd., declined comment to ABC News.A thick layer of foam could be seen on 98-foot stretch of the canal after the fire, an official with Britain’s Environment Agency said. However, in a written statement to ABC News, the agency said that water quality tests on the Ashton Canal, in Clayton, showed that the watercourse appeared to be normal.“There has been no impact on fish,” the agency said, adding officers would be on the site again on Wednesday to continue to monitor and respond as necessary.A Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority spokeswoman said she did not believe the foam was a result of firefighting materials.However, in the United States, it is known that the Navy uses a fire-suppressing agent called "aqueous film-forming foam," or AFFF."AFFF rapidly extinguishes hydrocarbon fuel fires," according to the U.S. Navy website. "It has the additional property of forming an aqueous film on the fuel surface that prevents evaporation and hence, re-ignition of the fuel once it has been extinguished by the foam." Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Brontosaurus Finally Validated as a Distinct Dinosaur Species

Brontosaurus Finally Validated as a Distinct Dinosaur SpeciesDorling Kindersley RF/Thinkstock(LISBON, Portugal) — On the edge of the solar system, the dwarf planet Pluto, which knows what it feels like to be banished from an exclusive club, may be cheering for the brontosaurus.The long-necked dinosaur's name is known by legions of fans; its image even made it on to a postage stamp in the 1980s, yet most paleontologists in recent years would have told people that there's no such dinosaur as "brontosaurus." The dinosaur popularly known as the brontosaurus is known to scientists as Apatosaurus excelsus.But the iconic dinosaur may finally be reinstated. More than a century after researchers found the long-necked brontosaurus and apatosaurus were likely different species in the same genus, an analysis published Tuesday in the journal PeerJ suggests that brontosaurus actually should be considered a separate dinosaur. Both dinosaurs lived approximately 150 million years ago."Until very recently, the claim that Brontosaurus was the same as Apatosaurus was completely reasonable, based on the knowledge we had," Emanuel Tschopp, one of the researchers from the New University of Lisbon in Portugal, said in a statement.Setting out to analyze the differences between the large grouping of diplodocid dinosaurs, which include the apatosaurus and other dinosaurs characterized by their long necks and plant-based diets, Tschopp and his team said they did not expect to resurrect the brontosaurus.Studying more recently discovered fossil evidence of similar dinosaurs, the researchers found enough distinctions to advocate placing the brontosaurus in its own genus.They found the apotosaurus had a bulkier neck, while the slightly more slender brontosaurus stood out for a longer bone found in its ankles."The differences we found between Brontosaurus and Apatosaurus were at least as numerous as the ones between other closely related genera, and much more than what you normally find between species," Roger Benson, a professor at the University of Oxford and co-author of the study, said in a statement.The brontosaurus' modern day story began in the 1870s when rival paleontologists Edward Cope and Othniel Marsh raced to publish new dinosaurs names.Marsh first discovered the apatosaurus and then two years later found another dinosaur fossil at the same location and named it the brontosaurus.In 1903, it was ruled that the two skeletons were too similar and were better classified as different species of the same genus, Apatosaurus.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Fukushima Radioactivity Detected on North American Shoreline

Fukushima Radioactivity Detected on North American ShorelineITSUO INOUYE/AFP/Getty Images(CAPE COD, Mass.) — Scientists have for the first time detected small amounts of radioactivity from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear reactor accident in Japan in a seawater sample from the shoreline of North America, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reported Monday.“Radioactivity can be dangerous, and we should be carefully monitoring the oceans after what is certainly the largest accidental release of radioactive contaminants to the oceans in history,” said Ken Buesseler, a marine chemist at the private nonprofit Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution based in Cape Cod, Mass.  He added, however, that the levels detected were “extremely low.”The sample, collected on Feb. 19 in Ucluelet, British Columbia, contained traces of cesium-134 and -137 in amounts believed to be below internationally established levels of concern to humans and marine life.“If someone were to swim for six hours a day every day of the year in water that contained levels of cesium twice as high as the Ucluelet sample, the radiation dose they would receive would still be more than one thousand times less than that of a single dental x-ray,” according to a statement published by Woods Hole.Samples have been collected at more than 60 sites along the U.S. and Canadian West Coast and Hawaii over the past 15 months, researchers said. While radioactivity from Fukushima was detected about 100 miles off the coast of northern California last November, nothing had yet been found along beaches or shorelines.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, who is also working with Japanese experts, expects to find more sites with detectable levels of cesium-134 in coming months, but warns that predicting the spread of radiation becomes more complex the closer it gets to the coast.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

British Prime Minister Caught Eating a Hot Dog with a Knife and Fork

British Prime Minister Caught Eating a Hot Dog with a Knife and Fork Kirsty Wigglesworth - WPA Pool/Getty Images(POOLE, England) — On the campaign trail, British Prime Minister David Cameron was invited Monday to a family Easter barbecue in Poole, a coastal town in southern England.Journalists and photographers attending the event expected to report on Cameron’s talk about tax and pensions with the Docherty family, but instead, a picture of his eating a hot dog with a knife and fork went viral.   Enjoying an Easter barbecue with the Dochertys - one of 22m households to benefit from today's tax & benefit changes. pic.twitter.com/e5UggM83oY — David Cameron (@David_Cameron) April 6, 2015   Before taking a bite, the Conservative leader waited for the cameras to leave, probably trying not to replicate Labour Leader Ed Miliband, who was caught by photographers earlier last year munching a bacon sandwich.But one photographer managed to snap a shot of the prime minister gracefully cutting up his hot dog.During a visit to the U.S back in 2012, the Daily Mail newspaper reported that "the posh Dave struggled to eat a hot dog without silver service" while being photographed eating a hot dog with President Obama at a basketball game.Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Missing Australian Boy with Autism Found Alive After Four-Day Search

Missing Australian Boy with Autism Found Alive After Four-Day Search Luke Shambrook, 11, was found in Fraser National Park in Victoria, Australia, April 7, 2015. (AuBC)(MELBOURNE, Australia) — An Australian boy with autism was found alive in a dense forest, four days after going missing, and was later reunited wi...

New Mass Graves Found in Iraq

New Mass Graves Found in Iraq drorhan/iStock/Thinkstock(TIKRIT, Iraq) -- Iraqi officials said on Monday they are exhuming several mass graves containing an estimated 1,700 bodies outside the northern city of Tikrit. The bodies found buried are said to be those of Iraqi soldiers that were based at nearby Camp Speicher, a former U.S. military base. The Sunni-led Islamic State has already claimed responsibility for killing the mostly Shiite soldiers. Tikrit had been a major stronghold for the extremist group until recently, when Iraqi forces regained control. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

South Korea’s Passion for Watching Strangers Eat Goes Mainstream

South Korea’s Passion for Watching Strangers Eat Goes Mainstream amanaimagesRF/Thinkstock(SEOUL, South Korea) -- Kim Hyo Jin, 25, known as “BJ Hyo-jjang” by her fans, talks, laughs and eats alone in front of her webcam every night. But actually she is accompanied by more than 100 people who watch her online and even chat with her as she dines. A strange way to enjoy one’s time with other people, but what is stranger is that she is paid for doing so. This trend of "muk-bang"—a combination of the Korean expressions "muk-da" and "bang-song," each translatable to eating and "broadcast"—has been around since 2008. It started off in the online livestreaming platform AfreecaTV. Individuals, who call themselves BJs—shortened for broadcast jockeys—eat large amounts of food, mostly unhealthy but mouthwatering plates and talk with the viewers, not only about what they are eating but whatever else is on their minds. Viewers send them "star-balloons," Internet currency that is the source of solid income for the BJs. The star-balloons are sometimes sent when they eat a lot or make funny comments, but most of the times, they are sent randomly. During the last year or two, watching other people eat has made its way into mainstream TV programs. Now, you can see people eating on TV screens. They don’t cook and then eat, like ABC’s The Chew or PBS’s America’s Test Kitchen, but they just eat. Eat and talk. It started off with the TV series Let’s Eat, which is about three singles gathering to dine together. About one-fifth of the 50-minute episode shows the three biting on food and chewing, the camera close-up on their mouths and the ends of their chopsticks. Programs like Tasty Road and Shik-Shin Road find popular restaurants and show celebrities trying the menus. You can see people digging into their dishes, making somewhat exaggerated sounds of eating and commenting on how delightful or disappointing the taste is. So, why are Koreans so attracted to “eating” shows?  Song Dong-min has been watching muk-bang through AfreecaTV for five years. The college student says, at first, watching the BJs devour portions that he couldn’t gave him vicarious satisfaction when he was on diet. However, when he was done with the diet, he couldn’t stop watching. “The BJs eat with a gusto and I just enjoyed watching them eat.” Park Junhwa, the director of Let’s Eat, gives a different reason for the trend which has made his series’ a hit. He believes the culture, which considers eating as a communal activity, is the key. “For Koreans, eating is about being together with other people. There are certain Korean foods, like the Korean barbeque sam-gyup-sal, that are more suitable for sharing with other people than eating alone. Sharing food is another way of saying 'enjoy this with me.'” He adds that the rise in single-person households is a push to this trend. Single-person households now make up 26 percent of all households, up 11 percentage points since 2000. So although more and more people live alone, many do not wish to eat alone. BJ Hyo-jjang says one of the best parts of working as a muk-bang BJ is communicating with her viewers and fans in real time: “Of course, income is an important part. However, the most motivating factor is my viewers’ wish to be with me and to see me eat and talk in front of the camera.” Hyo-jjang admits that muk-bang BJ is not a lifelong job, but she hopes to continue until her viewers do not want to see her on screen. Muk-bang has even changed her dream. Before she came on screen she was a translator, but now she hopes to work in the mainstream broadcast when she retires as a BJ. The Korean word for “family” is “shik-gu,” which also means "people who eat together." This word implies the weight put onto the act of eating in the Korean culture. Eating is one of the most intimate and essential parts of one’s life. To Koreans, sharing food is a way of affiliating with others. Hence, in the modern era where this tradition is fading, watching others eat or conversing with them via the screen may be a small source of a comfort. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Astronaut Reveals What Major League Baseball Opening Day Looks Like From Space

Astronaut Reveals What Major League Baseball Opening Day Looks Like From Space Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- While it's safe to say he won't be catching any home runs, astronaut Terry Virts had an out-of-this-world view of Major League Baseball's Opening Day. Virts, a Baltimore Orioles fan who has been at the International Space Station for the past few months, hopes to photograph all 28 cities with an MLB stadium. The plan is to post the photos to his Twitter and Instagram accounts with the hashtag #ISSPlayBall, and then to have his followers guess which city is pictured before he reveals the answer.   #OpeningDay! This #Namethe city prepared me for where I am today. #ISSPlayBall fans, guess now, answer comes later. pic.twitter.com/CeZb97QCvw — Terry W. Virts (@AstroTerry) April 6, 2015 "This is my favorite thing to do in orbit," Virts said, according to NASA. "But as good as the camera is, it's just not even close to the same thing as being here in person."   Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Astronaut Reveals What Major League Baseball Opening Day Looks Like From Space

Astronaut Reveals What Major League Baseball Opening Day Looks Like From Space Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- While it's safe to say he won't be catching any home runs, astronaut Terry Virts had an out-of-this-world view of Major League Baseball's Opening Day. Virts, a Baltimore Orioles fan who has been at the International Space Station for the past few months, hopes to photograph all 28 cities with an MLB stadium. The plan is to post the photos to his Twitter and Instagram accounts with the hashtag #ISSPlayBall, and then to have his followers guess which city is pictured before he reveals the answer.   #OpeningDay! This #Namethe city prepared me for where I am today. #ISSPlayBall fans, guess now, answer comes later. pic.twitter.com/CeZb97QCvw — Terry W. Virts (@AstroTerry) April 6, 2015 "This is my favorite thing to do in orbit," Virts said, according to NASA. "But as good as the camera is, it's just not even close to the same thing as being here in person."   Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Turkey Blocks Some Social Media Over Hostage Situation

Turkey Blocks Some Social Media Over Hostage Situation Viktor Lugovskoy/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(ISTANBUL) -- Turkish authorities have ordered blocks on both YouTube and Twitter due to images of a recent hostage situation. A court said on Monday that pictures showing a masked gunman holding a pistol to the head of a prosecutor were promoting terrorism. Last month, members of a banned leftist group took hostage prosecutor Mehmet Selim Kiraz in an Istanbul courthouse. Kiraz and two of the hostage takers were killed when Turkish special forces raided the building. The prosecutor was investigating the death of a teenage boy who was killed following nationwide protests in 2013. The boy was hit in the head with a police tear gas canister during demonstrations and languished in a coma for months before dying. The outlawed leftist group, the Revolutionary People's Liberation Front, called for police to admit to killing the boy, among other demands.This isn't the first time Turkey has clamped down on social media and blocked certain sites. Last year, a corruption scandal implicating several officials with ties to Turkey's president prompted a short ban on some social media. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Turkey Blocks Some Social Media Over Hostage Situation

Turkey Blocks Some Social Media Over Hostage Situation Viktor Lugovskoy/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(ISTANBUL) -- Turkish authorities have ordered blocks on both YouTube and Twitter due to images of a recent hostage situation. A court said on Monday that pictures showing a masked gunman holding a pistol to the head of a prosecutor were promoting terrorism. Last month, members of a banned leftist group took hostage prosecutor Mehmet Selim Kiraz in an Istanbul courthouse. Kiraz and two of the hostage takers were killed when Turkish special forces raided the building. The prosecutor was investigating the death of a teenage boy who was killed following nationwide protests in 2013. The boy was hit in the head with a police tear gas canister during demonstrations and languished in a coma for months before dying. The outlawed leftist group, the Revolutionary People's Liberation Front, called for police to admit to killing the boy, among other demands.This isn't the first time Turkey has clamped down on social media and blocked certain sites. Last year, a corruption scandal implicating several officials with ties to Turkey's president prompted a short ban on some social media. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Toxic Lake of Black Sludge in China Is the Result of Mining to Create Our Tech Gadgets

Toxic Lake of Black Sludge in China Is the Result of Mining to Create Our Tech Gadgets Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images(BAOTOU, China) -- There's a little-known lake about 5.5 miles in diameter in Inner Mongolia, China, but it's not the kind that offers prime waterfront real estate. This lake is toxic -- made entirely of black sludge and dangerous chemicals. "The artificial lake is a creation of the waste byproducts of rare earth mining, which retrieves essential minerals needed to create a lot of our tech gadgets," British writer Tim Maughan told ABC News Monday. Maughan originally wrote about the lake in a feature for the BBC. "Our lust for things like smartphones, flat-screen televisions and, ironically, even 'green technology,' is what's created this lake," Maughan said. "It's just really disturbing." Maughan said he discovered the lake last August while on a trip with a group of architects and designers called Unknown Fields. "We were travelling backwards through spots on the global supply chain for consumer goods made in China transported to our homes in the Western world," Maughan said. "The Baogang Steel and Rare Earth complex was our last stop." The industrial city reeked of sulfur, and the group wore paper masks during the trip, he said, adding the entire city felt like a grimy, alien, dystopian world. "We drove along a dirt road which wasn't guarded, climbed a huge black mound about three to four stories high and got to the shore of the lake," Maughan said. "There were hundreds of these black pipes through which sludge was coming from." All one could see on the toxic lake's horizon were refineries and towers of factory buildings, Maughan added, saying that many of the factories in the area processed minerals such as the kinds needed to make microphones and earbuds, and make our smartphone and tablet screens shiny. "And the weird irony was that a lot of this byproduct waste was also the result of processes used to create so-called 'green technology' like wind turbines and electric motors in electric cars," Maughan said. The vast sludge lake can even be seen on Google Maps. Maughan said the trip has made him feel conflicted about the constant technology being thrown at us. "I'm as guilty as anyone lusting after this stuff," he said. "Short-term, I think some ways to stop the demand for this is just not upgrading as frequently as we do. There's really no reason any of these devices shouldn't last us at least five years if not more, so we don't have to upgrade every year." Long-term, Maughan said he thinks we need to find a better way of producing these materials so they're less harmful to the people who make them and to the environment. "I just don't think it's right we're outsourcing this production to people who are willing to work 16-hour days at such low pay just so we can get this technology for cheap," he said. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Toxic Lake of Black Sludge in China Is the Result of Mining to Create Our Tech Gadgets

Toxic Lake of Black Sludge in China Is the Result of Mining to Create Our Tech Gadgets Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images(BAOTOU, China) -- There's a little-known lake about 5.5 miles in diameter in Inner Mongolia, China, but it's not the kind that offers prime waterfront real estate. This lake is toxic -- made entirely of black sludge and dangerous chemicals. "The artificial lake is a creation of the waste byproducts of rare earth mining, which retrieves essential minerals needed to create a lot of our tech gadgets," British writer Tim Maughan told ABC News Monday. Maughan originally wrote about the lake in a feature for the BBC. "Our lust for things like smartphones, flat-screen televisions and, ironically, even 'green technology,' is what's created this lake," Maughan said. "It's just really disturbing." Maughan said he discovered the lake last August while on a trip with a group of architects and designers called Unknown Fields. "We were travelling backwards through spots on the global supply chain for consumer goods made in China transported to our homes in the Western world," Maughan said. "The Baogang Steel and Rare Earth complex was our last stop." The industrial city reeked of sulfur, and the group wore paper masks during the trip, he said, adding the entire city felt like a grimy, alien, dystopian world. "We drove along a dirt road which wasn't guarded, climbed a huge black mound about three to four stories high and got to the shore of the lake," Maughan said. "There were hundreds of these black pipes through which sludge was coming from." All one could see on the toxic lake's horizon were refineries and towers of factory buildings, Maughan added, saying that many of the factories in the area processed minerals such as the kinds needed to make microphones and earbuds, and make our smartphone and tablet screens shiny. "And the weird irony was that a lot of this byproduct waste was also the result of processes used to create so-called 'green technology' like wind turbines and electric motors in electric cars," Maughan said. The vast sludge lake can even be seen on Google Maps. Maughan said the trip has made him feel conflicted about the constant technology being thrown at us. "I'm as guilty as anyone lusting after this stuff," he said. "Short-term, I think some ways to stop the demand for this is just not upgrading as frequently as we do. There's really no reason any of these devices shouldn't last us at least five years if not more, so we don't have to upgrade every year." Long-term, Maughan said he thinks we need to find a better way of producing these materials so they're less harmful to the people who make them and to the environment. "I just don't think it's right we're outsourcing this production to people who are willing to work 16-hour days at such low pay just so we can get this technology for cheap," he said. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Canadian Artist Adds Pop to Thrift Store Paintings, Ups Value

Canadian Artist Adds Pop to Thrift Store Paintings, Ups Value David Irvine/The Gnarled Branch(TORONTO) -- An artist outside Toronto, Canada, is adding popular characters and touches to thrift store finds and turning a tidy profit. David Irvine, of Brampton, calls the work "Re-directed Art," which includes the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man in a classic scene or Star Wars characters in a serene landscape painting. Irvine, 46, said they can sell for $300 to $800. Some of his work is on exhibit at The Flying Pony Gallery in Toronto, and he also sells work via Etsy.Of his re-directed art, he told ABC News that over 90 percent are prints on board and the rest are originals. "They are usually old and in bad shape so I touch up marks and scratches, etc., to bring it back to its original form, then I add in my own elements. My only rule is that I never paint over the original signature," Irvine said. "Generally most are bought at thrift shops, yard sales and even salvaged from the curb. I hate seeing waste and when I see a painting collecting dust on a shelf, I see potential, not garbage." Irvine has been creating and selling art for over 25 years. His website is called GnarledBranch.com, the idea of which came in 2004 when he noticed a wooden table that was discarded in the trash.For locals in the Toronto area, he also accepts commissions if you have an idea of something you want to add to a thrift store painting. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Prince Harry Arrives in Australia as Military Career Winds Down

Prince Harry Arrives in Australia as Military Career Winds Down Lukas Coch - Pool/Getty Images(CANBERRA, Australia) -- Prince Harry arrived in Australia Monday, where he will spend the next four weeks wrapping up his military career.His first order of business: Laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and greeting fans in the capital Canberra.Harry's four-week deployment with the Australian Army will next take him to Darwin, Sydney and Perth. The trip is part of his "military goodbye" as Captain Harry Wales, as he is known in the British Army, prepares for the next chapter in his life.Harry, the fourth-in-line to the British throne, joined the British Army in May 2005 and rose to the rank of Apache helicopter commander. The British Defense Ministry named Harry the best front-seat pilot, or co-pilot gunner, in February 2012 from his class of more than 20 fellow Apache helicopter pilots.He served as a forward air controller in Afghanistan from 2007 to 2008. He returned to the U.K. when his cover was blown. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant with the Household Cavalry in 2008, and began training as an Army Air Corps pilot in January 2009. In July 2010, he began the 18-month Apache training course, during which he was awarded the prize for best co-pilot gunner.He served a second tour of Afghanistan as an Apache helicopter pilot from 2012 to 2013. Later that year, he qualified as an Apache aircraft commander. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Prince William and Duchess Kate Prepare for Baby No. 2

Prince William and Duchess Kate Prepare for Baby No. 2 Dan Kitwood/Getty Images(LONDON) -- With a late-April due date for Duchess Kate Middleton just around the corner, royal baby fever and preparations for Prince William and Kate’s new bundle of joy are in full swing.“I think they are really excited about the new baby,” said Victoria Murphy, ABC News’ royal contributor. “I think Prince Charles is particularly excited.”As the new baby’s grandparents await his or her arrival, the soon-to-be-second-time parents, Kate and William, are getting their ducks in a row.Duchess Kate, 33, is now officially on maternity leave after making her last official public appearance at three engagements with William in London on March 27.William, 32, has begun his new role as a newly-minted air ambulance pilot.Once the new baby is born, the family of four -- including big brother Prince George -- will spend time nesting at Amner Hall, their 10-bedroom country mansion on the queen’s Norfolk, England, estate.Until then, royal watchers are playing a royal guessing game as to whether the new baby will be a boy or a girl. Kate and William have not publicly revealed the baby’s gender, nor Kate’s exact due date.Ladbrokes, a U.K.-based online gaming company, has said that “82 percent of all wagers” are now predicting “a princess is on the way.”“That was the story over the weekend, that Kate and William had samples of pink paint sent to Amner Hall,” Murphy said. “We’ve heard about her out and about shopping, going to shops, buying things herself.”“She’s very hands-on when it comes to decorating,” she said of Kate.“Kate said when they were pregnant with George that William wanted a little girl, and Prince Charles has said that he wants a little girl this time, so it does seem to be pointing towards everyone wanting a little girl,” Murphy added. “But I do think...they would be very happy if they had another boy.” Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Snowmobiler Captures Avalanche Survival on Camera

Snowmobiler Captures Avalanche Survival on Camera Stockbyte/Thinkstock(VANCOUVER, British Columbia) -- The terrifying moment a snowmobiler was swallowed up by an avalanche was captured on camera thanks to a GoPro camera mounted on his helmet.Snowmobiler Curtis Johnson posted a video to YouTube on March 28, showing how the near-fatal incident unfolded near Blue Lake in British Columbia, Canada.For two minutes, the video shows nothing but a blinding white as Johnson is buried beneath nearly 3 feet of snow.Finally, you see the snow moved back and Johnson’s friends, who had been using their hands and shovels to try to free him, come into view.A fellow snowmobile enthusiast, Steve Wheeler, who was not involved in the incident, says time must have been moving slowly for Johnson."That two minutes must have felt like two hours,” Wheeler, the owner of No Limits Motorsports in Squamish, British Columbia, told CTV News.“Everyone in the back country should have a shovel and a beacon,” Wheeler said.In Wyoming two months ago, a similar incident was captured on camera when Sam Robinson was snowmobiling and triggered an avalanche that almost took his life.“It’s always fun to push the extreme for people like me,” Robinson said, “but it’s scary when the extreme pushes back.” Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

US Ambassador Mark Lippert Wearing ‘Amazing’ Brace After Knife Attack

US Ambassador Mark Lippert Wearing ‘Amazing’ Brace After Knife Attack JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images(SEOUL, South Korea) — U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is drawing attention for the dynamic splint he is wearing on his arm while recovering from a March knife attack.The brace features an exoskeletal design, allowing him to move his fingers and hold objects.“It is an amazing apparatus, one I haven’t seen before -- so innovative and creative,” he wrote in a Facebook post.  According to Lippert, 42, the brace was created by Seoul’s Severance Hospital. Lippert was slashed by a knife-wielding attacker March 5 in the South Korean capital of Seoul. He received 80 stitches. World News Videos | US News Videos Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

World’s Largest Atom Smasher Wakes Up After Two Years

World’s Largest Atom Smasher Wakes Up After Two Years Harold Cunningham/Getty Images(GENEVA) -- The world's most powerful atom smasher that has provided insight into the beginnings of the universe is ready to get back to work.The Large Hadron Collider revved back to life over the weekend in Switzerland after two years of maintenance, according to a statement from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)."After two years of effort, the LHC is in great shape," CERN Director Frédérick Bordry said in a statement. "But the most important step is still to come when we increase the energy of the beams to new record levels." Located in Geneva, the complex machine came back to life on Sunday as a proton beam zipped through the nearly 17-mile-long ring deep underground. A second beam circulated in the opposite direction, according to CERN.In the coming days, the energy in the atom smasher is expected to be nearly double that of its first run, allowing researchers to conduct new experiments that could lead to a better understanding of dark matter, the invisible matter that does not interact with the electromagnetic force of the universe.The Large Hadron Collider had previous success in 2012, solving one of the universe's mysteries when the machine discovered experimental evidence for the Higgs boson particle. Nicknamed the "God particle" by some, it is believed to explain how other particles get their mass.The finding earned Peter Higgs and Francois Englert the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. Follow @ABCNewsRadio Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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