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Apple Seeks Ban on Samsung Galaxy S III, Note 10.1

PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The jury might have handed Apple a win in the U.S.-based intellectual property trial, but the Apple v. Samsung battle is far from over.

Early last week Apple requested an injunction on eight of the Samsung phones that were at the center of its intellectual property trial with Samsung, including the Galaxy S 2. But because the law moves slowly many of those phones are no longer on the market.

Apple’s on it though. Late on Friday, Apple requested that Samsung’s latest Galaxy S III, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note 10.1 and others be banned. The Galaxy S III was released in the U.S. in June and the Galaxy Note 10.1 just a few weeks ago. The complaint filed by Apple actually comes in a separate case from the one that was just ruled on a few weeks ago; this suit deals with different utility patents, including ones that over slide to unlock and universal search.

“Since then, Samsung has continued to release new infringing products, including its current flagship device, the Galaxy S III,” Apple wrote in the amended complaint. “While Samsung’s new products infringe many of the same design patents, utility patents, trademarks, and trade dress rights that are at issue in the earlier case, Samsung’s new products also infringe additional utility patents, some of which issued after Apple filed the Earlier Case.”

On Aug. 24, a California jury found that the majority of Samsung smartphones and tablets violated patents held by Apple and recommend Apple be awarded $1.05 billion. Other courts around the world haven’t been as certain of Samsung’s willful patent infringement: respective courts in Japan and South Korean recently rejected Apple’s claims against Samsung.

Last week, Bloomberg reported that Apple and Google, maker of the Android software used in these Samsung phones, have been meeting to discuss an end to the ongoing disputes.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Apple Seeks Ban on Samsung Galaxy S III, Note 10.1

PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The jury might have handed Apple a win in the U.S.-based intellectual property trial, but the Apple v. Samsung battle is far from over.

Early last week Apple requested an injunction on eight of the Samsung phones that were at the center of its intellectual property trial with Samsung, including the Galaxy S 2. But because the law moves slowly many of those phones are no longer on the market.

Apple’s on it though. Late on Friday, Apple requested that Samsung’s latest Galaxy S III, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note 10.1 and others be banned. The Galaxy S III was released in the U.S. in June and the Galaxy Note 10.1 just a few weeks ago. The complaint filed by Apple actually comes in a separate case from the one that was just ruled on a few weeks ago; this suit deals with different utility patents, including ones that over slide to unlock and universal search.

“Since then, Samsung has continued to release new infringing products, including its current flagship device, the Galaxy S III,” Apple wrote in the amended complaint. “While Samsung’s new products infringe many of the same design patents, utility patents, trademarks, and trade dress rights that are at issue in the earlier case, Samsung’s new products also infringe additional utility patents, some of which issued after Apple filed the Earlier Case.”

On Aug. 24, a California jury found that the majority of Samsung smartphones and tablets violated patents held by Apple and recommend Apple be awarded $1.05 billion. Other courts around the world haven’t been as certain of Samsung’s willful patent infringement: respective courts in Japan and South Korean recently rejected Apple’s claims against Samsung.

Last week, Bloomberg reported that Apple and Google, maker of the Android software used in these Samsung phones, have been meeting to discuss an end to the ongoing disputes.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

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