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Stuck in a Crummy Relationship? Don’t Talk About It So Much

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- People with relationship problems often share what’s bugging them with friends or family members.  And that can be therapeutic...to a point.

A survey of 1,000 adults conducted by professional services website Pearl.com reveals that the more someone gabs about their unlucky love life, the more people will try to avoid them.

In fact, nearly two-thirds of 25- to 34-year-olds admit that they’ve gone out of their way to ditch a pal or relative obsessed with talking about their dates or lack thereof.

As for the top three issues regarding relationships among survey respondents ages 18-to-34, 44 percent said their main concern was figuring how long to keep a relationship going and subsequently, when to leave.

Thirty-five percent listed getting over a former flame as their number one relationship problem, while 34 percent said it was the age old question of whether a current significant other was cheating.

When it comes to seeking out relationship advice, a majority of men and women said they’d turn to a trusted female friend first.  Family members were less sought out, with three-in-ten survey respondents admitting their relatives would only dish out bad advice.

On a more personal note, 44 percent claimed they would tell their partner if the sexual side of their relationship was lousy while 39 percent would apparently be too embarrassed to open their mouths about it.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Stuck in a Crummy Relationship? Don’t Talk About It So Much

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- People with relationship problems often share what’s bugging them with friends or family members.  And that can be therapeutic...to a point.

A survey of 1,000 adults conducted by professional services website Pearl.com reveals that the more someone gabs about their unlucky love life, the more people will try to avoid them.

In fact, nearly two-thirds of 25- to 34-year-olds admit that they’ve gone out of their way to ditch a pal or relative obsessed with talking about their dates or lack thereof.

As for the top three issues regarding relationships among survey respondents ages 18-to-34, 44 percent said their main concern was figuring how long to keep a relationship going and subsequently, when to leave.

Thirty-five percent listed getting over a former flame as their number one relationship problem, while 34 percent said it was the age old question of whether a current significant other was cheating.

When it comes to seeking out relationship advice, a majority of men and women said they’d turn to a trusted female friend first.  Family members were less sought out, with three-in-ten survey respondents admitting their relatives would only dish out bad advice.

On a more personal note, 44 percent claimed they would tell their partner if the sexual side of their relationship was lousy while 39 percent would apparently be too embarrassed to open their mouths about it.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

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