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Aid Group Assesses Damage in Philippines from Typhoon Hagupit

Aid Group Assesses Damage in Philippines from Typhoon Hagupit

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Members of the International Rescue Committee arrived in the municipality Daram, Philippines, on Thursday to assess damage left in the wake of Typhoon Hagupit.Many feared the worst for the island community's 41,000 residents, nearly all living in coastal villages vulnerable to winds and storm surge. What they found was minimal damage brought by the storm and life slowly returning to normal. Residents were cleaning up and burning debris.Mayor Lucia Astorga, who accompanied the IRC, said he believes that preparation was the reason why Daram suffered no casualties, missing or injured. Evacuation began days in advance of the storm, with every single resident temporarily sheltering in local schools and buildings.Over the next few days the IRC will be providing immediate aid and assessing damage, group officials said. The group, in conjunction with local partners, is planning to assist the community with its rebuilding process and in preparing for future disasters.

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WATCH: Panda Triplets Reunite with Mom, Get Tender Bear Hugs

WATCH: Panda Triplets Reunite with Mom, Get Tender Bear Hugs

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Panda triplets that were reunited with their mother for the first time since their birth this summer were greeted with tender bear hugs.The world’s only surviving set of panda triplets met their mom at the Chimelong Safari Park in Guangdong, China on Tuesday.The fuzzy babies were born in July and were too much for mama bear to handle -- until now.

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Nearly 270,000 Tons of Trash Floating in World’s Oceans: Study

Nearly 270,000 Tons of Trash Floating in World’s Oceans: Study

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Nearly 270,000 tons of plastic are floating in the world's oceans, according to a new study.That's divided into at least 5.25 trillion plastic pieces, researchers wrote.

"Plastics of all sizes were found in all ocean regions," said the report, published on Wednesday in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.Researchers only measured plastic floating at the surface of the oceans -- not on the ocean floor. The study also doesn't take into consideration any of the other trash polluting the seas.The study used a mix of methods to come to its conclusions. Scientists visited 1,571 points in the ocean to count plastic debris. They used mesh nets to gather small bits of plastic, counted larger items from boats, and used technology to calculate plastic collected in parts of the ocean they didn't survey.

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Mourners Lay to Rest Palestinian Who Died During Protest

Mourners Lay to Rest Palestinian Who Died During Protest

iStock/Thinkstock(JERUSALEM) — Thousands flocked to the state funeral Thursday for a high-ranking Palestinian official who died at a protest over Jewish settlements. Palestinian honor guards placed the coffin of Zaid Abu Ein on a red carpet at the Presidential compound in Ramallah.Abu Ein, 55, died Wednesday at a hospital after fainting at the protest. He was considered a minister with the Palestinian Authority although he did not hold an official cabinet position.Photos of the protest in Turmus Aya began circulating immediately afterwards with one showing an Israeli soldier grabbing Abu Ein by the neck with one hand.Before Israeli medics at the protest could examine him, Palestinian supporters rushed Abu Ein to a nearby clinic and then to a hospital in Ramallah where he was pronounced dead.Israeli and Palestinian authorities are investigating Abu Ein’s controversial death, which has enraged Palestinians and further roiled relations between the two sides. Both Israeli and Palestinian pathologists have concluded from the autopsy that Abu Ein’s death was caused by a stress-induced heart attack. Eighty percent of Abu Ein's heart arteries were clogged and scar tissue attested to previous heart attacks, according to the released autopsy. Signs of internal bleeding were also found around Abu Ein's neck, which Palestinian doctors say is evidence of the neck-grabbing scuttle with Israeli soldiers that sent Abu Ein into cardiac arrest. The Israelis say he was vulnerable for many reasons.  President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority said later, "What happened today is an intolerable crime in every sense of the word. All options are open for examination, discussion and application."

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Main Hong Kong Protest Camp Dismantled by Police

Main Hong Kong Protest Camp Dismantled by Police

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(HONG KONG) — After more than 10 weeks of protests, the main and largest protester camp in Hong Kong's pro-democracy "Umbrella Movement" was systematically dismantled in a police operation Thursday.What started in September with a passionate surge of support tens of thousands strong, initiated in part by police firing tear gas into the crowds, ended 75 days later with a defiant but peaceful sit-in by a core group of 100 protesters who waited more than eight hours for police to arrest them.After weeks of having their once-venerated reputation tarnished, the arrests conducted by the Hong Kong Police were exceedingly civil and even, at times, polite. Officers would kneel next to a protester and read them their rights before another group of officers would walk or carry them out of the protest zone.At one point a police representative advised the protesters awaiting arrest to remember to stretch to avoid cramps.The protesters did not put up much of fight either, shouting, "We want true universal suffrage" as they were escorted one by one into a police transport bus.The police had given the pro-democracy protesters a two-day warning earlier this week that it would clear the remaining camp on Thursday. The main protest camp, which protesters had dubbed "Umbrella Square," straddled and occupied a main stretch of highway in Hong Kong and had caused gridlock across the city for the past couple of months.After one last rally that brought out over 10,000 supporters Wednesday night, only a core group of about 100 pro-democracy lawmakers, activists and students leaders remained by the time the police sealed off the site mid-afternoon.Shortly after 2 p.m. local time, police surrounded the protest site and marched slowly in a line formation, pushing past and tearing down tents and belongings for the dump trucks that followed behind. Many of the protesters had already packed up and left the site before the police curfew, leaving behind a largely empty protest village.Exhausted and frustrated by the lack of concessions by Beijing or the Hong Kong government, turnout and support for the student-led protests had waned in the recent month. In a poll conducted last month by Hong Kong University, 80 percent of respondents wanted the occupation to end.The largely peaceful protests occasionally descended into violent confrontations with riot police, which reached its peak last week as the students made a failed attempt at blockading the government offices.The protesters want Beijing to allow free elections for Hong Kong's next leader in 2017. China says it will allow everyone in the self-governing Chinese territory to vote but a pro-Beijing committee will pre-screen candidates.The pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong was seen by many as one of the most serious challenges to the Chinese Communist Party's authority a since the 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations in Beijing's Tiananmen Square.While the protesters left the highways of downtown Hong Kong Thursday (a tiny holdout in a shopping district still remains), student leaders say the legacy of the past 10 weeks will remain."The biggest success of the protests is that people are awakened," leader Alex Chow, 24, told The Wall Street Journal. "The young generation will be the engine of reform."Despite the unpopularity of the Occupy methods, Hong Kong residents remain fairly evenly split, especially between older and younger generations, on the way forward for city's democratic future.Before the police cleared the site, banners left behind by the protesters gave a warning to Beijing and Hong Kong Government: "We Will Be Back."

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UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Says No Impunity for CIA Torture Allegations, DOJ Vows to Defend US Officials

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Says No Impunity for CIA Torture Allegations, DOJ Vows to Defend US Officials

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The United Nations' High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra'ad Al-Hussein, said on Wednesday, the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention against Torture, that the U.S. report on CIA torturing highlights the need to eradicate torture worldwide."As yesterday's U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report shows, torture is still taking place in quite a few of the 156 countries that have ratified the Convention against Torture and have domestic legislation making it illegal," Zeid said. The convention, he added, allows "no exceptional circumstances whatsoever" for justification of torture. "The Convention lets no one off the hook – neither the torturers themselves, nor the policy-makers, nor the public officials who define the policy or give the orders.”Zeid continued, “In all countries, if someone commits murder, they are prosecuted and jailed. If they commit rape or armed robbery, they are prosecuted and jailed. If they order, enable or commit torture – recognized as a serious international crime – they cannot simply be granted impunity because of political expediency."Still, the Department of Justice said Wednesday that it would work to "prevent unwarranted prosecution of U.S. officials." Acknowledging the content of the report, the DOJ said that "the U.S. is committed to complying with its domestic and international obligations and we believe that allegations about conduct by U.S. officials are best handled through appropriate domestic mechanisms."

The U.K.'s The Guardian reported on Wednesday that CIA officials could face arrests abroad as a result of investigations by foreign courts.

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US-Trained Syrian Rebels to Be Ready by March 2016

US-Trained Syrian Rebels to Be Ready by March 2016

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The top U.S. envoy for the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria said on Wednesday that training for 5,000 Syrian rebel fighters would begin in 2015 and take about one year.Testifying before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Special Envoy Brett McGurk said he hoped the training would begin in earnest in March 2015. Rep. Ted Poe, R-Texas, expressed skepticism, noting that ISIS will still be operating in that time frame.Poe asked McGurk to clarify whether the first 5,000 Syrian rebels would be trained in the fight against ISIS by March 2015, or whether training would begin then. When McGurk explained that that was the start date and training would take one year, Poe responded, saying that, "March of 2016. Then we have a plan. Then we have fighters. Then we send them to Syria. There's no telling what ISIS can do in that year and however many months it is."

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Britain Admits to Hunt for Suspected Russian Sub in UK Waters

Britain Admits to Hunt for Suspected Russian Sub in UK Waters

Daniel Gale/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- The British government acknowledged Wednesday that a submarine periscope had been sighted in waters near a main U.K. base, touching off a massive NATO hunt in November.The government also said that it had requested help from other nations in its search for the submarine off Scotland shores in November.A pair of U.S. Navy P-3 Orions, as well as Canadian and French planes and two British warships, scoured the waters for days when the periscope was seen in November.Britain reportedly got rid of similar sea-searching aircraft during defense cuts.Russia has been flexing its military muscle recently, in Ukraine and throughout Europe, frequently flying bombing runs near NATO airspace. At sea, Russian warships conducted surprise exercises in the English Channel in November.In October, the Swedish military said that a photograph and advanced sonar data had seemed to show a foreign submarine in the waters off Stockholm.Russia has denied any involvement.The Swedes hunted for the submarine for a month. All ships were ordered to leave a cluster of islands where the vessel had been possibly spotted. A no-fly zone was also put into effect over the area.No trace of a submarine was found and the search was called off.

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US Conducted 20 Airstrikes in Iraq, Syria

US Conducted 20 Airstrikes in Iraq, Syria

Michael Fitzsimmons/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- So far this week, the U.S. has taken part in 13 airstrikes in Iraq and seven more in Syria.The Syrian airstrikes all took place near the town of Kobani and destroyed five fighting positions controlled by militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Also targeted were three additional fighting positions and an ISIS unit, all of which were struck.The strikes in Iraq targeted areas near Sinjar, al-Qaim, Ramadi, Mosul, Samarra and Kirkuk. U.S. Central Command says that those strikes destroyed six ISIS-controlled buildings, four storage containers, two fighting positions, two armored vehicles, two other vehicles, a heavy weapon and a bunker. Reports indicate an ISIS guard tower, two bunkers, two armored vehicles, two armored personnel carriers and four tactical units were struck.The Pentagon's latest data shows that the airstrikes undertaken in Iraq and Syria, which began on August 8, have come at a cost of about $910 million.That figure is as of Nov. 27, which places the daily cost of those strikes at $8.1 million. If that daily cost has remained the same since Thanksgiving, the total cost of airstrikes would have surpassed $1 billion in the last few days.

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Campaign Pushes for Right-to-Die Legislation in Italy

Campaign Pushes for Right-to-Die Legislation in Italy

iStock/Thinkstock(ROME) -- A campaign of leading doctors, politicians and those terminally ill in Italy is challenging the country's Vatican-influenced laws that ban euthanasia.A video appeal features the testimonials of 70 leading Italians urging their government to begin discussing right-to-die legislation. The appeal comes a year after the group proposed legislation that would give Italians more control over how they die. That would include both the right to euthanasia and to a living will, where legal instructions are written on what medical assistance a person wants in the future if he or she becomes incapable of communicating. Sixty percent of Italians are in favor of regulated euthanasia and more than 70 percent would like the right to compose a living will. But Italian politicians have so far refused to take up the issue. Many are still heavily influenced by Catholic church teaching against any form of assisted suicide.

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Israel Braces for Protests After Death of Palestinian Official

Israel Braces for Protests After Death of Palestinian Official

iStock/Thinkstock(JERUSALEM) -- Israel is bracing for a night of riots across the West Bank after the death of a high-ranking Palestinian official Wednesday at a West Bank protest.The Israeli Army says it is investigating why Palestinian Cabinet Minister Zaid Abu Ein died at a hospital after fainting at a West Bank protest. Palestinian eyewitnesses are blaming an Israeli soldier who they say struck Abu Ein in the chest with the butt of a rifle. Israeli journalists at the scene dispute this. Some suspect Abu Ein, whose family says he was diabetic, may have had a heart attack.Israel is sending a doctor to conduct a joint autopsy with the Palestinian pathologists and has called for a joint probe of the incident as well.

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Obama: US ‘in Conversations’ with Cuba About Releasing American

Obama: US ‘in Conversations’ with Cuba About Releasing American

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama for the first time publicly acknowledged that the U.S. is negotiating with Cuba for the release of American contractor Alan Gross through a “variety of channels.”In an interview with Jorge Ramos for Fusion -- a sister network to ABC News -- Obama said, “We’ve been in conversations about how we can get Alan Gross home for quite some time.”Gross is being held on espionage charges in Havana for the past five years, and sources who have visited with Gross recently told ABC News his health has vastly deteriorated.He has lost all but one of his front teeth, can barely walk because of hip damage, and is blind in one eye.“We continue to be concerned about him. We think that he shouldn’t have been held in the first place,” Obama told Ramos. “With respect to Cuba generally, I’ve made very clear that the policies that we have in making remittances easier for Cuban families, and making it easier for families to travel, have been helpful to people inside Cuba...But the Cuban government still needs to make significant changes.”Last week, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said the detention of Gross has been a barrier to more constructive talks with the island nation."The Cuban government’s release of Alan on humanitarian grounds would remove an impediment to more constructive relations between the United States and Cuba," Earnest said.Sources have told ABC News previously that the Obama administration takes seriously promises by Gross to not spend another year in the Cuban military hospital and to begin a possible death inducing hunger strike by the end of this year, and are looking for a solution with the Cuban government.

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This Is What the Bottom of the Indian Ocean Looks Like

This Is What the Bottom of the Indian Ocean Looks Like

Australian Transport Saftey Bureau(NEW YORK) — Australian search teams who are actively hunting for any sign of the missing Malaysian Airlines flight have not found any evidence of the plane yet.That said, the Australian Transport Safety Board has been providing regular updates on the search and have now released a visualization of what the seafloor looks like.The picture is actually a synthetic aperture sonar acoustic image of the seafloor, and it gives viewers a hint at how difficult the search is because of the odd shapes and slightly varying gradation levels.All told, the team has searched more than 9,000 square kilometers of the seafloor in the Indian Ocean and are continuing along an estimated route that the plane may have taken.

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Pirate Bay: What’s Next for File-Sharing Website After Sweden Police Raid

Pirate Bay: What’s Next for File-Sharing Website After Sweden Police Raid

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The Pirate Bay, a controversial file-sharing website that has survived for more than a decade, was knocked offline following a police raid in Sweden.The raid marked the first time in a while the site had been knocked offline instead of being blocked by Internet Service Providers in various countries.Peter Sunde, a co-founder of the website who is no longer involved, expressed indifference and wrote on his blog that he is "not been a fan of what TPB has become.""It feels good that it might have closed down forever, just a real shame the way it did that," he wrote. "A planned retirement would have given the community time and a way to kick off something new, something better, something faster, something more reliable and with no chance of corrupting itself. Something that had a soul and could retain it."

 

It seems #tpb has been raided. If it stays down for good I hope there's technology ready to replace it. If so, please no more porn ads!

— Peter Sunde (@brokep) December 9, 2014

 

"The site was ugly, full of bugs, old code and old design. It never changed except for one thing -- the ads," Sunde wrote. "More and more ads was filling the site, and somehow when it felt unimaginable to make these ads more distasteful they somehow ended up even worse."It appeared that a mirror of the website was back online Wednesday under a Costa Rican domain suffix, however with problems with its search functionality.Despite the conviction of several individuals involved with The Pirate Bay on copyright infringement charges, its high traffic and attempts to block it, The Pirate Bay, for the most part, managed to continue to operate and evade authorities.One way The Pirate Bay achieved this was by switching from torrent files, which the site was required to host, to magnet links, which offer a cloud-based solution.The site's administrators said in a February 2012 Facebook post that the switch would be cheaper and "also make it harder for our common enemies to stop us."While this may be the most significant blow in recent times to The Pirate Bay, Alan Woodward, a cyber security expert and a professor at the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom, told ABC News he expects the site will "resurrect."Woodward said the site's administrators have "distributed themselves in a more interesting way to make themselves more raid proof."In the United Kingdom, where The Pirate Bay is blocked, Woodward said there are proxy websites that allow users to get around the filters."I would be surprised if they don't come back in some form," he said. "I think a lot of people will fill in the vacuum. Watch that space."

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“TIME” Magazine Names Ebola Fighters ‘Person of the Year’

“TIME” Magazine Names Ebola Fighters ‘Person of the Year’

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — TIME magazine Wednesday named those who fought against Ebola as its "Person of the Year."The five covers show various doctors and nurses, including Dr. Kent Brantly, an American missionary who survived his bout with Ebola.Editor Nancy Gibbs singled out Salome Karwah, a nurse's assistant for Doctors Without Borders who "stayed at the bedsides of patients, bathing and feeding them, even after losing both her parents — who ran a medical clinic — in a single week and surviving Ebola herself."The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has infected more than 17,800, mainly in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

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Prosecutors Fail to Get Pistorius’ Sentence Doubled

Prosecutors Fail to Get Pistorius’ Sentence Doubled

Jemal Countess/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) — The prosecution in the case against South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius that asked the trial judge for permission to appeal his conviction on a charge of culpable homicide and his five-year sentence won one and lost one Wednesday.Judge Thokozile Masipa granted permission for the state to appeal Pistorius’ conviction for culpable homicide, the equivalent of manslaughter in the U.S., in connection with the death of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year. Pistroius fired four shots through a locked bathroom door in his home, claiming he thought she was an intruder.However, the judge Wednesday denied permission for the state to appeal Pistorius’ five-year sentence. The chief prosecution had asked for 10 years.During the appeal of the culpable homicide conviction, prosecutors may come up with a new charge against Pistorius.If Pistorius ends up being convicted of a more serious charge, he could get a new, longer sentence.Pistorius, 28, was initally charged with murder for killing Steenkamp but Masipa ruled the state did noy produce enough evidence to warrant the charge. After his conviction for culpable homicide, she sentenced Pistorius last October to five years behind bars.

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US Embassy in Pakistan Posts Warning Following Release of CIA Interrogation Report

US Embassy in Pakistan Posts Warning Following Release of CIA Interrogation Report

Juan Bernal/iStock/Thinkstock(ISLAMABAD) -- The U.S. Embassy in Pakistan is urging Americans in the nation to be especially careful following Tuesday's release of a report on the CIA's use of enhanced interrogation techniques, which critics call torture.The report's release, "could prompt anti-U.S. protests and violence against U.S. interests, including private U.S. citizens," a message posted on the embassy's website reads. Americans in Pakistan are urged to stay away from demonstrations, keep a low profiles, avoid large gatherings and exercise caution. The Pentagon and the State Department had said prior to the report's release that violence could arise as a reaction to the information it includes. Further, the embassy is telling American citizens to vary the times and routes on which they travel when in Pakistan and to avoid patterns that would allow others to predict when and where they will be. "Depending on ongoing security assessments, and as part of routine operational security measures, the U.S. Mission occasionally places areas such as hotels, markets, airports, and/or restaurants off limits to official personnel," the message concludes.

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American Arrested in Israel Accused of Plotting to Attack Muslim Holy Sites

American Arrested in Israel Accused of Plotting to Attack Muslim Holy Sites

Pawel Gaul/iStock/Thinkstock(JERUSALEM) -- A U.S. official confirmed on Tuesday that an American citizen was arrested in Israel last month for allegedly plotting to blow up Muslim holy sites.Adam Everet Livix, a Texas resident, was arrested on Nov. 19 for illegal possession of arms and suspicion of plotting terror attacks against Muslim holy sites, as well as other locations. Israel's domestic security service, the Shin Bet, said on Tuesday that Livix was also wanted in the U.S. for drug-related crimes.Livix lived in Bethlehem and Hebron, in the Palestinian-controlled West Bank, since arriving in the region in 2013. About six months ago, Livix apparently crossed into Israel. The Shin Bet says that the weapons Livix possessed were stolen from the Israel Defense Forces, though it was not clear who stole them.

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Hikers on Ice So Clear It Appears They Are Walking on Water

Hikers on Ice So Clear It Appears They Are Walking on Water

Serban Bogdan/iStock/Thinkstock(BRATISLAVA, Slovakia) -- This is about as close as mere mortals will come to walking on water.A new YouTube video described as being taken in the High Tatras Mountains in Slovakia is going viral, with the stunning footage showing two hikers walking on ice that is so crystal clear that it appears they are walking on the surface of a still lake.

The video has racked up more than 235,000 views already since it was uploaded on Monday.

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Psychologists Made $80M from CIA Interrogation Program

Psychologists Made $80M from CIA Interrogation Program

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The two psychologists contracted by the CIA to design the enhanced interrogation techniques used against al-Qaeda suspects were paid more than $80 million, even though they were never themselves interrogators, according to the Senate Intelligence Committee’s “torture report,” released Tuesday -- a report that one of the psychologists told ABC News was "bulls**t."“On the CIA’s behalf, the contract psychologists developed theories of interrogation based on ‘learned helplessness,’ and developed the list of enhanced interrogation techniques that was approved for use against [al-Qaeda operative] Abu Zubaydah and subsequent CIA detainees,” the report says, referring to the list of techniques that included slapping captives and waterboarding, among others. "By 2005, the CIA had overwhelmingly outsourced operations related to the program."In 2009, ABC News identified the psychologists as former military officers Jim Mitchell and Bruce Jessen.“The whole intense interrogation concept that we hear about, is essentially their concepts,” Col. Steven Kleinman, an Air Force interrogator, said in the original ABC News report.Both Mitchell and Jessen declined to speak with ABC News for the 2009 report, but on Tuesday Mitchell said that he believed the Senate report to be politically motivated "bulls**t"."I think it's despicable that they cherry-picked all of that stuff," Mitchell told ABC News, while insisting that he could not confirm nor deny his involvement in the program due to a nondisclosure agreement. "There were a lot of men and women in the CIA who put their lives on the line, and some of them died after 9/11 protecting the United States. And to suggest that they lied to the president, that they lied to the Senate, that they falsified intel reports so they could make a program look better than it was, is despicable.""The men and women of the CIA put their lives on the line, put their personal lives on hold, and sacrificed for this country. And now at last, before they leave, dump this steaming load of crap out?" Mitchell said.Before working for the Agency, Mitchell and Jessen were involved in the U.S. military program that trains pilots and other high-risk service members to survive behind enemy lines and resist brutal tactics if captured.But the Senate report said, "Neither psychologist had any experience as an interrogator, nor did either have specialized knowledge of [al-Qaeda], a background in counterterrorism, or any relevant cultural or linguistic expertise."As ABC News reported in 2009, CIA documents revealed then indicated that Jessen and Mitchell’s waterboarding “expertise” was probably “misrepresented" and thus, there was no reason to believe it was "medically safe" or effective. The waterboarding used on al-Qaeda detainees was far more intense than the brief sessions used on U.S. military personnel in the training classes.According to Tuesday’s Senate report, the two created their own company specifically to deal with the CIA and secured a “base contract” with the CIA “in excess of $180 million.” The contractors actually received $81 million before the contract was terminated in 2009, the report says. Associates told ABC News in 2009 that the pair bragged about making $1,000 a day.More broadly, the Senate report criticized the whole enhanced interrogation program, saying the techniques were “not effective” and that the CIA management of the program was “inadequate and deeply flawed.”Mitchell declined to comment on the reported $81 million, but further described his feelings about the report:"It's like somebody backed up to your driveway and dumped a steaming pile of horse [expletive]," he told ABC News.ABC News was unable to reach Jessen for comment on this report.

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