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Local resort opening its aerial tram for skiers this week

Outdoors

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The following is a news release from the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming – Jackson Hole Mountain Resort announced Monday that it will open the iconic Aerial Tram for the winter 2021-22 season on Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021, offering 4,139 vertical feet of skiing and riding.

“We are pleased to open our iconic Aerial Tram just in time for a celebratory holiday break. The Bridger Gondola, Casper lift, Marmot lift, Thunder lift and Sublette lift opened this weekend, after 48 inches of snow fell from the most recent storm,” JHMR President Mary Kate Buckley said. “The Aerial Tram is an essential part of our mountain, and it’s always a special moment when we see Big Red carrying skiers and riders to the summit of Rendezvous Mountain.”

Tuesday’s opening marks the first time the Aerial Tram will run at full capacity since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and masks will be required while riding the tram. Per Teton County Health Orders, which are in effect through Dec. 31, masks are required in all indoor spaces. The Resort reminds guests that capacity on the mountain is limited, with reservations required for multi-resort passes and recommended for day tickets.

Corbet’s Cabin will offer dine-in service and operate from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, serving its world-famous waffles until 2:30 p.m. Sightseeing tickets will not be offered on the Aerial Tram this winter.

Stay informed and connected this winter through JHMR’s free app, JH Insider, and sign up for SMS text alerts. These digital platforms provide important information about operational details and promotions. Download the app and text JHMR to 855-246-1761 to sign up for SMS text alerts.

Early season conditions still exist, and guests are advised to stay out of all closed areas and look for hazards. The backcountry gates at the Resort are temporarily closed due to a shallow snowpack below 8,000 feet, which was a decision made in collaboration with Bridger-Teton National Forest, Teton County Search and Rescue, Grand Teton National Park and Sheriff Matt Carr.

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