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Terrorists planned to kidnap Michigan’s governor. How did that affect Brad Little?

Politics

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BOISE (Idaho Statesman) — Last week, 13 people were arrested for allegedly planning to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. On Tuesday, an FBI agent testifying in that case said the group had also talked about kidnapping Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam.

That raised a question: Has Idaho Gov. Brad Little received any threats following his March 25 stay-at-home order prompted by the coronavirus pandemic?

Like Whitmer’s and Northam’s orders, Little’s have drawn controversy.

His order led to businesses and schools shutting down and banned large gatherings.

Whitmer, a Democrat, came under fire for issuing an emergency order over the pandemic and extending it in April by executive order. It shut down businesses and limited public and private gatherings. On Monday, the Michigan Supreme Court denied Whitmer’s request to delay execution of a court opinion that her executive order was unconstitutional.

Northam, also a Democrat, issued similar shutdown orders.

Little, a Republican, was criticized by members of his own party, most notably Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin, who railed against the shutdown of businesses and attended or supported rallies opposing Little’s stay-at-home order.

Critics of Little spent the summer collecting signatures for a recall, but fell short. The recall revolved around Little’s actions after the pandemic took hold in Idaho and the mandatory closures of businesses throughout the state.

Little’s office did not immediately reply Tuesday to an email asking whether the governor has received any threats since his stay-at-home order was issued in March. The Idaho State Police deferred comment to the governor’s office.

Asked whether any changes to Little’s security arrangements had been made in light of the Michigan plot, his spokesperson, Marissa Morrison Hyer, said by email, “Gov. Little’s security protocols remain consistent thanks to the diligence and expertise of the Idaho State Police.”

Morrison Hyer did not elaborate on the protocols followed to ensure Little’s safety.

Nearly seven months later, Idaho remains locked in Stage 4 of Little’s recovery plan. Social distancing requirements remain in place, and Idahoans are still encouraged to wear face masks in public. The city of Boise and Ada, Blaine and Valley counties have mask mandates.

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