TODAY'S WEATHER
Your weather
-2°
broken clouds
humidity: 83%
wind: 6mph N
H -2 • L -2

Capitol riot ‘Captain Moroni’ expected to reach plea agreement

Crime Watch

Share This

WASHINGTON — A man who dressed as Captain Moroni, a character from the Book of Mormon, plans to plead guilty to joining the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot in Washington, D.C.

Federal court records show Nathan Wayne Entrekin, 48, of Cottonwood, Arizona, has a plea agreement hearing Friday. The FBI arrested Entrekin in July after federal prosecutors charged him with misdemeanor charges of entering a restricted building and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

RELATED | FBI arrests ‘Captain Moroni’ after Capitol riot

It is not clear what Entrekin will plead guilty to.

Entrekin drove across the country to Washington to join the riot wearing a gladiator-style costume he used to look like Captain Moroni, a righteous warrior in the Book of Mormon. Entrekin’s garb included a wooden dowel with a piece of white cloth attached.

“In memory of our God, our religion, and freedom, and our peace, our wives, and our children. Alma 46:12,” the cloth read. In the Book of Mormon, Captain Moroni carried a similar banner called the Title of Liberty.

Throughout the Capitol riot, Entrekin stood out, capturing the attention of those with cameras who interviewed him.

“I am Captain Moroni. I am the William Wallace of the Book of Mormon. In the Book of Alma of the Book of Mormon, a freedom fighter named Captain Moroni fought for his freedom against the kingmen. He was a freeman, part of the freemen movement,” Entrekin said to one interviewer.

Warning: Explicit language in video.

Entrekin went on to tell the story of Captain Moroni and his purpose for being at the riot.

“I am here to represent that – the Mormon element. ‘Cause a lot of people are like Mitt Romney, you know, and I … there’s a lot of infiltrators in our nation, in our Capitol, in our churches. I think Mitt Romney might be one of those people,” Entrekin said according to court documents.

Since the riots, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has condemned “violence” and “lawless behavior” in Washington.

“While The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is neutral in matters of party politics, we remind our members — whatever their individual political views — to be united in our commitment to the Savior Jesus Christ and his teachings,” the church said in a statement. “As his followers, we should treat one another and all of God’s children with respect, dignity and love. No political or other affiliation should supersede that covenant and sacred responsibility.”

Since the Capitol riot, federal court records show over 700 people from across the United States have been charged in connection to the incident.

So far, six people from Idaho have been charged for their alleged participation.

SUBMIT A CORRECTION