Police release video of suspected serial killer who once lived in southeast Idaho

Crime Watch

PRESTON — Authorities in New Hampshire recently released new video footage of a quadruple homicide suspect who once lived in Preston.

The video depicts the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office in California interviewing Robert “Bob” Evans during the investigation into the 2002 disappearance of his wife, Eunsoon Jun. At the time, he was living under the alias Larry Vanner.

Evans later pleaded guilty to Jun’s murder after her body was found in the crawlspace of their home. He died in prison in 2010.

The New Hampshire State Police released the 2002 video, and the law enforcement agency is looking for anybody who recognizes Evans, particularly through the mannerisms and choice of words he exhibited during the police interview.

Authorities in New Hampshire made national headlines in January after they announced that Evans was a suspect in a decades-old quadruple homicide case known as the Bear Brook Murders.

In 1985, the bodies of an adult woman and a young child were found in a 55-gallon metal drum in Bear Brook State Park in Allenstown, New Hampshire. Both victims were wrapped in plastic and died from blunt force trauma.

Fifteen years later in 2000, a New Hampshire state trooper looking for new evidence at the original crime scene area found another 55-gallon metal drum, which contained the bodies of two young girls. The cause of death of these two girls has never been determined.

Investigators recently discovered through DNA evidence that Evans was the father of one of the girls found in Bear Brook State Park. DNA evidence also determined that the adult woman was related to two of the three girls.

However, the four females who were found in the metal drums have never been identified. Investigators said they all died sometime between 1977 and 1985.

Evans was known to have been living near the state park in the early 1980s. In 1981, Denise Beaudin, her infant daughter, and her boyfriend, Evans, disappeared from the city of Manchester, which is located about 20 miles southwest of Bear Brook State Park.

Police said Beaudin’s family members never reported her missing because they believed she ran off to start a new life due to financial problems. Authorities first classified her as a missing person in December 2016.

Beaudin’s daughter later reappeared in California when she was around 5 years old, though it wasn’t until recently that authorities determined that Beaudin was her mother.

Though Beaudin has not been seen since 1981, police said she is not the adult female who was found in Bear Brook State Park in 1985. Still, police are investigating the possibility that she was murdered by Evans, even though her remains have not been found.

Since these new revelations regarding the Bear Brook Murders came to light, authorities have been investigating Evans’ past to see if he had any other victims. Police in New Hampshire hope somebody recognizes Evans in the newly released video and comes forward with new information about his past.

Before his death, Evans told police that he lived in a variety of locations across North America, including New Hampshire, California, Virginia, Texas and Quebec.

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, he also lived in Preston during the mid-1980s, where he stole a vehicle and claimed to have worked on a farm.

Evans also used a variety of aliases during his lifetime, including Gordon Jenson, Gordon Curtis Jensen, Curtis Mayo Kimball, Gerry Mockerman and Lawrence William Vanner.

Crystal Douglas, the founder of East Idaho Cold Cases Inc., told the Journal in January that she was not aware of any cold case murders in the Preston area between 1986 and 1988, when Evans was in southeast Idaho.

This article was originally published in the Idaho State Journal. It is used here with permission.

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