Biz Buzz: New European-style restaurant opening in Idaho Falls soon

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Do you want to know what’s happening on the east Idaho business scene? We’ve got you covered.

Here is a rundown of this week’s business news across the valley.

BIZ BRIEF

IDAHO FALLS

New restaurant replacing Babe’s Bakery in Idaho Falls

Rett Nelson | EastIdahoNews.com

IDAHO FALLS – A new mom and pop restaurant is going in where Babe’s Bakery used to be.

1 Fine Cafe is tentatively scheduled to open Oct. 1. It will offer an eclectic assortment of rich bread-based dishes such as scones, quiche and even in-house made granola.

“The menu is based off our breads, which are artisan-style, old loaf breads,” owner David Kempner tells EastIdahoNews.com.

Kempner describes the restaurant as a higher-end, European-style restaurant that will serve breakfast and lunch.

“We’re trying to step it up a level and give people menu options they probably haven’t seen before,” Kempner says. “The bread we’re offering is all about patience and love. The recipes are simple and the food is pretty distinctive. I don’t like masking my food with too many ingredients.”

Each table will be covered with butchers paper and there will be easels set up for customers to use while they wait for their order. Colored and graphite pencils along with crayons and paint will be available for people to release their inner artist.

Kempner is co-owner of the business with his wife, Jenny. Kempner grew up in Idaho Falls and has worked in the restaurant industry for more than 25 years. He currently owns a dinner theater restaurant in Vail, Colorado where he lived for several years.

1 Fine Cafe is located at 1900 Channing Way. They will be open Tuesday through Sunday until 3 p.m. The opening time is still being determined. Kempner says their menu is labor-intensive and will focus on quality, which will be reflected in the price.

The average price of a menu item will be in the $15 to $20 range, Kempner says.

“We have a passion for food and we hope to share that passion with our customers. When people come in and taste the food and get the vibe of the place, that statement will make more sense.”

For more information, visit their Facebook page or their website.

BIZ BITS

AMMON

What’s going on with the old Kmart building in Ammon?

AMMON – Many of you have asked what is going on with the old Kmart building in Ammon. There have been reports of construction happening on the vacant building. Others have reported the building is available for lease.

We reached out to Micah Austin, the city administrator, to see what we could learn.

He tells EastIdahoNews.com there is currently no activity happening on the building. There is no evidence of construction or any new business moving in, Austin says.

We will follow up with the city in a month or so to see if anything has changed.

Meanwhile, there are several other vacant buildings in Idaho Falls, including the old Toys ‘R’ Us, the old Deseret Industries and Kingston Plaza on West Broadway. What’s happening with these buildings?

We are looking into this and hope to post an article soon. Stay with EastIdahoNews.com for updates.

IDAHO FALLS

Appliance company now open at a new location

Rett Nelson | EastIdahoNews.com

IDAHO FALLS – A Pro Appliance LLC is now open at their new location 1772 North Woodruff in Idaho Falls.

The appliance repair business is a certified Whirlpool dealer that offers washers, dryers and refrigerators with scratches and dents that still have the full manufacturer’s warranty.

The business offered refurbished appliances exclusively at their previous location downtown. After adding the scratch and dent service, co-owner Shontil Sperl tells EastIdahoNews.com they needed more space.

“We just want to be a blessing to people. We offer fair prices and fair installations and repairs. We don’t have any huge aspirations. We just want to be a trustworthy business in the community and make a living,” Sperl says.

A Pro Appliance is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. To learn more, visit their website or their Facebook page.

COMMUNITY CAUSES

BLACKFOOT – Blackfoot couple Dennis and Brittany Page will be hosting a fundraiser for Primary Children’s Hospital in August. Their son, Rigin, was born with a heart defect and was later diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder called Kleefstra Syndrome. Rigin, who is now 5, has been in and out of Primary Children’s Hospital many times. Dennis Page tells EastIdahoNews.com this fundraiser is their way of saying thank you for everything Primary Children’s Hospital has done for Rigin and their family. The fundraiser is happening Saturday, August 25 and kicks off with a motorcycle race at 10 a.m. A full day of fun and entertainment will follow. EastIdahoNews.com will post an article soon.

IDAHO FALLS – Jacob Clark, an Idaho Falls business owner, is hosting a fundraiser for the Snake River Animal Shelter Wednesday, August 1. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., there will be two lemonade/iced tea stands set up downtown. One stand will be on the corner of Park Avenue and B Street. The other will be on the corner of B Street and River Parkway. Clark says they are asking for a minimum donation of $0.25 for a glass of lemonade or iced tea. All the proceeds will be given to the Snake River Animal Shelter.

If you have a community cause/fundraiser and want us to help spread the word, send it to rett.nelson@eastidahonews.com. Please use “community cause” in the subject line.

BIZ BUGS

TOPIC: TAB NABBING

The following is a news release from the Better Business Bureau.

How many times a day do you go to different tabs to check your bank account, credit card statement or do online shopping? Hard to guess. And now, con artists have found a way to take advantage of this practice to get you to type your username and password into a fake page: tabnabbing.

Tabnabbing is a type of phishing scam where a website you have open changes its appearance to look like a different, but familiar, website while the open tab is inactive. Con artists hope you don’t recognize the difference and enter your login credentials.

This scam begins with trust, which can make it hard to detect. Modern technology allows con artists to rewrite tabs and their contents even while the tab stays inactive. Then a fake page is loaded, consumers are directed to the fake page, and they enter personal information.

Is it really a significant lapse in personal data protection if scammers get the login information for your email account? In addition to having to reset passwords and tell everyone you have been hacked, the attackers can use access to your email to change the password on other accounts, like your bank. And remember, the con artist has seen details that could be used in other scams, such as your birth date, where you live, where you work, etc. It doesn’t take much nowadays for scammers to utilize your personal information for their own needs.

But what would happen if you logged into your bank account online or you check your credit card statement? If you did so using a fake web page that’s made to look like a legitimate company, then you’ve just given everything a tabnabbing scammer needs to access these accounts. Loss of funds, possible identity theft, charges on your credit cards all could happen.

So, before entering your credentials into a tab that you left open and seems very familiar to you, take just a second and do a double check. Ensure that it’s the real URL of the company and not a tabnabbing scam. And remember, it’s a good idea to close a tab when you are done using it.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT…

New money-saving lighting system installed at city hall, Pocatello officials say

Locals petition for splash pad at old Reinhart Pool in Idaho Falls

Hundreds of butterflies on display inside new Butterfly Haven in Pingree

New restaurant to move into burned Rexburg KFC building

If you have a Biz Buzz item you want to share, send it to rett.nelson@eastidahonews.com. Remember to use “Biz Buzz” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to sign up for the free Biz Buzz email newsletter.

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