What are some of the medical benefits of reading to my child? - East Idaho News

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What are some of the medical benefits of reading to my child?

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Have a medical-related question you've always wanted answered? The doctors at the Pediatric Center are here to help! Email your 'Ask the Doctor' questions to news@eastidahonews.com and they might end up in our weekly column.

Question: What are some of the medical benefits of reading to my child?

Answer: As parents, we want to give our children the best start in life, and one of the most powerful ways to do that is by reading to them from a young age. The importance of this simple yet profound act cannot be overstated.

Reading to your child stimulates their imagination, fosters language development, and lays the foundation for a lifelong love of learning. Even infants benefit from being read to, as it helps them become familiar with the cadence and rhythm of language. Regular exposure to language through reading has been shown to help children improve both their vocabulary and communication skills.

As children grow, reading together strengthens the parent-child bond and provides valuable opportunities for connection and communication. It opens the door to meaningful conversations and encourages curiosity about the world around them. Reading has also been shown to be effective in reducing stress between children and caregivers as well as enhancing a sense of security.

Furthermore, studies have shown that children who are read to regularly tend to perform better in school and develop stronger literacy skills. Reading stimulates brain development, critical thinking, and problem-solving and comprehension skills. They also have greater empathy and social understanding, as they are exposed to a variety of characters and experiences through books.

At The Pediatric Center, we feel reading to and with children is so important!. We have joined the Reach out and Read program and hand out a book at every well child check from the ages of 6 months through 5 years.

So, whether it’s a beloved bedtime story or a quiet afternoon spent with a picture book, make reading a cherished part of your daily routine. By sharing the magic of storytelling with your child, you’re not just teaching them to read – you’re giving them the gift of a brighter future filled with endless possibilities.

This column does not establish a provider/patient relationship and is for general informational purposes only. This column is not a substitute for consulting with a physician or other health care provider.

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