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DOE investing more than $800,000 in Idaho to advance nuclear technology

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U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette | Courtesy Wikipedia

IDAHO FALLS – During a visit to the Idaho National Laboratory last week, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette announced more than $65 million in nuclear energy research for projects across the country.

“Advancing the next generation of nuclear energy is paramount to ensuring reliable, clean electricity for the American people. If we are serious about making substantial progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, then emissions-free nuclear energy must be a part of that conversation,” Brouillette says in a news release.

The funds are being awarded to 93 projects across 28 different states. More than $800,000 has been allocated for projects in eastern Idaho.

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An undetermined amount is being awarded to the INL for various research experiments.

Idaho State University in Pocatello will be awarded $59,262 to replace the control rod drive for its nuclear reactor. The project will focus on improving its design to make it more reliable and safe, as well as decrease its complexity.

Boise State University and the University of Idaho are also included on the list.

BSU will be awarded $319,941 to allow them to manufacture metal at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls. Another $400,000 will help the Univ. of Idaho with radiation research and determine its effect on metal and other substances.

“Investments in programs like these help strengthen American leadership in nuclear innovation by supporting the development of the next generation of talent,” says Dr. Rita Baranwal, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. “DOE is committed to ensuring that researchers have access to cutting-edge infrastructure and lab capabilities to develop advanced nuclear technologies.”

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